USING EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS  RESEARCH TO DESIGN THEORY-DRIVENEVALUATION AIMING TO IMPROVE QUALITY            OF EDUCAT...
INTRODUCTIONEducational Effectiveness Research (EER) aims to identifyfactors operating at different levels which can expla...
OUTLINE1)   Phases of EER2)   The dynamic      model    of   educational     effectiveness3)   Theory-driven evaluation st...
Phases of EERFirst Phase: A focus on Size of School Effects (Establishingthe field by showing that ‘school matters’ )Studi...
Phases of EERThird Phase: Modelling Educational Effectiveness.By the late 1990s several integrated models ofeducational ef...
Phases of EERFourth Phase: Focus on Complexity (analysis of the complex natureof educational effectiveness developed furth...
THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL   EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWA) The Rationale of the Model  Takes into account the new goa...
THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL   EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWB) The Essential Characteristics of the Dynamic Model   The m...
THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL   EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWFactors at the school and system level have direct and indire...
THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL   EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWThere is a need to examine the relationshipsbetween factors w...
THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL   EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWC) Classroom Factors of the Dynamic Model  Classroom factors ...
THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL   EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEW Frequency is a quantitative way to measure the functioning o...
THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL   EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEW  The quality refers to the properties of the factor  itself,...
THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL   EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWD) School Factors of the Dynamic Model  School factors influe...
THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL   EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWThe dynamic model is concerned with the processes andthe acti...
THEORY-DRIVEN EVALUATION STUDIESTheory driven evaluation is a collection of differentmethodological approaches that can be...
THEORY-DRIVEN EVALUATION STUDIESThe agenda is expanded in such a way as to allowevaluators to not only provide answers to ...
EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN     FROM THE DYNAMIC MODELA) Criteria of Evaluation   Measuring the Impact of the Reform...
EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN     FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL B) Taking into account the Multilevel Nature ofEducation  Use...
EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN     FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL E) Going Beyond Stakeholders’ Reactions towardsthe Reform  Wh...
EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN     FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL Teachers’ reactions towards the reform Examining teachers’ at...
EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN     FROM THE DYNAMIC MODELLooking at changes in teacher behaviour in the classroom  Find...
EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN     FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL EER may provide a list of criteria that may help researchers ...
EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN     FROM THE DYNAMIC MODELF) Using the Measurement Framework of the Dynamic Modelto Desi...
EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN     FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL  The stage dimension is seen as a very important measurement ...
EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN     FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL The   measurement     framework     can   be    used     in i...
EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN     FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL  The stage dimension is measured by looking at the  period in...
A FRAMEWORK FOR CONDUCTING THEORY-DRIVEN   EVALUATIONS: THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE              DYNAMIC MODEL1) Reformulate t...
A FRAMEWORK FOR CONDUCTING THEORY-DRIVEN   EVALUATIONS: THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE              DYNAMIC MODEL 3) Collecting a...
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Using Educational Effectiveness research to Design Theory-Driven Evaluation Aiming to Improve Quality of Education / B.P.M. Creemers & L. Kyriakides

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Using Educational Effectiveness research to Design Theory-Driven Evaluation Aiming to Improve Quality of Education / B.P.M. Creemers & L. Kyriakides

  1. 1. USING EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS RESEARCH TO DESIGN THEORY-DRIVENEVALUATION AIMING TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF EDUCATION B.P.M. CREEMERS 1 & L. KYRIAKIDES 2 Faculty of Behavioral and Social Sciences, University of Groningen, the Netherlands 1 Department of Education, University of Cyprus, Cyprus2
  2. 2. INTRODUCTIONEducational Effectiveness Research (EER) aims to identifyfactors operating at different levels which can explainvariations in student achievement by taking into account theinfluence of background characteristics.EER attempts to establish and test theories which explain whyand how some schools and teachers are more effective thanothers in promoting better outcomes for students.The origins of EER stem from reactions to work on equality ofopportunity in education that was conducted in the USA andundertaken by Coleman et al (1966), and Jencks et al (1972).The first two effectiveness studies (Edmonds, 1979; Rutter etal., 1979) were concerned with examining evidence and makingan argument about the potential power of schooling to make adifference in the life chances of students.These two studies were followed by numerous studies indifferent countries on educational effectiveness.
  3. 3. OUTLINE1) Phases of EER2) The dynamic model of educational effectiveness3) Theory-driven evaluation studies4) Evaluation studies: lessons drawn from the dynamic model5) A framework for conducting theory- driven evaluations: the contribution of the dynamic model
  4. 4. Phases of EERFirst Phase: A focus on Size of School Effects (Establishingthe field by showing that ‘school matters’ )Studies conducted during the early 1980s showed howimportant it is for students to have effective teachers andschools.School and teacher effects tend to be larger for disadvantagedgroups.Second Phase: A focus on the characteristics/correlates ofeffectiveness (searching for factors associated with betterstudent outcomes)In the late 1980s and early 1990s, EER was mainly concernedwith identifying factors associated with student outcomes.These studies resulted in a list of factors which were treatedas characteristics of effective teachers and schools.
  5. 5. Phases of EERThird Phase: Modelling Educational Effectiveness.By the late 1990s several integrated models ofeducational effectiveness were developed. Thesemodels sought to explain why factors which operateat different levels are associated with studentoutcomes.These models guided not only the theoreticaldevelopment of EER but also the design of empiricalstudies within the field.
  6. 6. Phases of EERFourth Phase: Focus on Complexity (analysis of the complex natureof educational effectiveness developed further links with the studyof school improvement).Addressing issues such as consistency, stability, and differentialeffectiveness. The move away from seeing effectiveness as an essentially stable characteristic to one that varies across years and may differ for different student outcomes or in relation to different groups of students places change at the heart of EER.Researchers gave attention to the study of complexity in educationand pointed to the fact that the theoretical models of the thirdphase had not emphasised the dynamic perspective of education.The field became increasingly linked with the growth of large scale,systematic evaluations of the long term effect of teachers andschools and of local and national reform policies.
  7. 7. THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWA) The Rationale of the Model Takes into account the new goals of education and related to this their implications for teaching and learning. The dynamic model is established in a way that helps policy makers and practitioners to improve educational practice by taking rational decisions concerning the optimal fit of the factors within the model and the present situation in the schools or educational systems. The model should not only be parsimonious but also be able to describe the complex nature of educational effectiveness.
  8. 8. THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWB) The Essential Characteristics of the Dynamic Model The model is multilevel in nature. Teaching and learning situation is emphasised. School-level factors influence the teaching-learning situation by developing and evaluating the school policy on teaching and the policy on creating a learning environment at the school. The system level refers to the influence of the educational system through a more formal way, especially through developing and evaluating the educational policy at the national/regional level. The teaching and learning situation is influenced by the wider educational context. The values of the society for learning and the importance attached to education play an important role in shaping teacher and student expectations and in the development of the perceptions of stakeholders about effective teaching practice.
  9. 9. THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWFactors at the school and system level have direct and indirecteffects on student achievement.The impact of the school- and system- level factors is definedand measured in a different way than the impact of classroom-level factors. Only changes in those factors for which schools face significant problems are expected to be associated with the improvement of school effectiveness. The impact of school and system level factors depends on the current situation of the objects under investigation.The relation of some effectiveness factors with achievement maynot be linear. Optimal points for the functioning of factors in relation to student outcomes have to be identified.
  10. 10. THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWThere is a need to examine the relationshipsbetween factors which operate at the same level. Such approach to modelling school effectiveness reveals grouping of factors that make teachers and schools effective.Different dimensions for measuring the functioningof effectiveness factors are used. Each factor is defined and measured using five dimensions: frequency, focus, stage, quality, and differentiation.
  11. 11. THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWC) Classroom Factors of the Dynamic Model Classroom factors refer to observable instructional behaviour of teachers in the classroom rather than on factors that may explain such behaviour. The eight factors included in the model are as follows: orientation, structuring, questioning, teaching-modelling, applications, management of time, teacher role in making classroom a learning environment, and assessment. These eight factors do not refer only to one approach of teaching such as structured or direct teaching or to approaches associated with constructivism.
  12. 12. THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEW Frequency is a quantitative way to measure the functioning of each factor. The other four dimensions examine qualitative characteristics of the functioning of the factors. Two aspects of the focus dimension are taken into account. The first one refers to the specificity of the activities associated with the functioning of the factor whereas the second one to the number of purposes for which an activity takes place. The stage at which tasks associated with a factor take place is also examined. Factors need to take place over a long period of time to ensure that they have a continuous direct or indirect effect on student learning.
  13. 13. THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEW The quality refers to the properties of the factor itself, as these are discussed in the literature. Differentiation refers to the extent to which activities associated with a factor are implemented in the same way for all the subjects involved with it. Adaptation to specific needs of each subject or group of subjects will increase the successful implementation of a factor and will maximize its effect on learning outcomes.Considering effectiveness factors as multidimensionalconstructs may help us develop strategies forimproving educational practice.
  14. 14. THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWD) School Factors of the Dynamic Model School factors influence classroom-level factors. The dynamic model gives emphasis to two main aspects of the school policy which affect learning at both the level of students and teachers: a) school policy for teaching and b) school policy for creating a learning environment at school. These two factors refer to the actions taken by the school to help teachers and other stakeholders have a clear understanding of what is expected from them to do. Support offered to teachers and other stakeholders to implement the school policy is also an aspect of these factors.
  15. 15. THE DYNAMIC MODEL OF EDUCATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS: AN OVERVIEWThe dynamic model is concerned with the processes andthe activities which take place in the school in order toimprove the teaching practice and its learningenvironment.The following four overarching factors at the schoollevel are included in the model: school policy for teaching and actions taken for improving teaching practice, evaluation of school policy for teaching and of actions taken to improve teaching, policy for creating a SLE and actions taken for improving the SLE, and evaluation of the SLE
  16. 16. THEORY-DRIVEN EVALUATION STUDIESTheory driven evaluation is a collection of differentmethodological approaches that can be used byevaluators in trying to understand the impact of areform policy.Evaluation has the task of testing out the underlyingprogramme theories and identifying unintendedconsequences, which may or may not be beneficial.When one evaluates, he/she always returns to the coretheories about how a programme is supposed to work andthen interrogates it by asking whether the basic plan issound, plausible, durable, practical, and above all, valid.Evaluation projects that are theory driven take intoaccount the needs and issues raised by the variousstakeholders associated with an innovation.
  17. 17. THEORY-DRIVEN EVALUATION STUDIESThe agenda is expanded in such a way as to allowevaluators to not only provide answers to the questionsraised by stakeholders but also help them understandthe reasons why a reform is more or less effective.Evaluators in education should make use of the growingknowledge base of EER as it is concerned with thecorrelates of effective practice and provides theoriesabout their relationships with each other and withstudent outcomes.EER can be seen as a theoretical foundation upon whichbetter evaluation studies in education can be designed.Theories of educational effectiveness can helpevaluators identify factors most closely associatedwith the effective implementation of a reform.
  18. 18. EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN FROM THE DYNAMIC MODELA) Criteria of Evaluation Measuring the Impact of the Reform on Student Achievement Evaluators adopting the dynamic model should identify the extent to which the organisation units (e.g., schools or educational systems) which implement the reform managed to improve their effectiveness status (by looking at the progress that their students made during the implementation of the reform). Both direct and indirect effects of the reform on student achievement should be measured. Indirect effects: They should find out whether the reform has any impact on the functioning of effectiveness factor(s). Evaluators searching for the impact of a national reform in using IT in teaching mathematics should find out whether the reform had any effect on teacher behaviour in the classroom.
  19. 19. EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL B) Taking into account the Multilevel Nature ofEducation Use multilevel statistical modelling approaches to identify the impact of reform on student achievement. Searching for indirect effects upon factors operating at different levelsC) Take into account the skills of those associated with the reform to implement itD) Use data of formative evaluation to take decisions on how to improve the impact of the reform on effectiveness factors associated with the nature of the reform.
  20. 20. EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL E) Going Beyond Stakeholders’ Reactions towardsthe Reform When evaluating a reform, researches face difficulties in reducing their scope of examination since reforms constitute complex phenomena, and numerous aspects of them should be examined. There will be variation in the ability of teachers and schools to implement any reform. Evaluators should search for characteristics of teachers and schools that make them more or less effective in implementing the reform.
  21. 21. EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL Teachers’ reactions towards the reform Examining teachers’ attitudes, thoughts, and criticism regarding a reform is judged imperative. Teachers’ perspectives and responses to a reform should not be considered independently of the context in which they operate. Some schools seem to implement reforms in supportive ways while others resist more to the introduction of the reform. Knowing that colleagues in a school are implementing the reform successfully creates a productive atmosphere for teachers to experiment with the reform.
  22. 22. EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN FROM THE DYNAMIC MODELLooking at changes in teacher behaviour in the classroom Findings of evaluation studies looking at the perceptions of stakeholders cannot help us explain the differences in the effective implementation of the reform from classroom to classroom and school to school. A reform is seldom implemented as planned; teachers often make adaptations to the proposed reforms either to fit with their professional judgment and ideologies or to match the realities of their experiences and meet their students’ needs. What matters in an educational reform is not the availability of supporting resources but the quality of teachers themselves which determines the quality of teaching and, consequently, the effectiveness of any reform policy.
  23. 23. EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL EER may provide a list of criteria that may help researchers elaborate on and study teachers’ practices during the reform implementation. EER could facilitate the investigation of teachers’ professional development, if there is any, during the implementation of the reform. The dynamic model may offer a blueprint for conducting observations. The dynamic model may help in providing a historical perspective of teachers’ practice as regards the reform rather than a motionless picture of teachers’ implementation of the reform at a specific time.
  24. 24. EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN FROM THE DYNAMIC MODELF) Using the Measurement Framework of the Dynamic Modelto Design Evaluation Studies and Build a Meta-evaluationSystem The framework of the dynamic model can be used in analysing the characteristics of the reform. Frequency: we may raise questions such as how many types of software are recommended to be used or how many lesson plans are offered to teachers in order to support them in using IT in teaching mathematics. Focus: Investigate whether the guidelines given and/or the actions taken for improving teaching practice are too specific (or too general) in terms of what each teacher is expected to do. We can also examine the purpose(s) that are expected to be achieved by the reform policy, and especially whether the reform aims to achieve a single (e.g., improving teaching) or more purposes.
  25. 25. EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL The stage dimension is seen as a very important measurement dimension since according to the dynamic model, the reform policy should be flexible, as this is reflected in the fact that, from time to time, changes in the reform policy take place. Continuity of the reform policy is also examined. We measure the extent to which changes in the reform policy emerge from the results of a systematic evaluation of the reform. Quality is measured by investigating the properties of the guidelines on using IT in teaching mathematics, especially whether these are clear, concrete, in line with the literature, and provide support to teachers, students, and administrators to implement the reform policy. Differentiation is measured by investigating the extent to which school policy is designed in such a way that more support is given to teachers and students who have difficulties in implementing the policy.
  26. 26. EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL The measurement framework can be used in investigating the implementation of a reform in different organisations (e.g., schools or classrooms). Frequency can be measured by looking at the extent to which the reform policy is implemented in a classroom or a school. Focus: We can investigate the extent to which teachers or schools implement a policy by following exactly what they have been asked to do or whether they are flexible in implementing the reform policy.
  27. 27. EVALUATION STUDIES: LESSONS DRAWN FROM THE DYNAMIC MODEL The stage dimension is measured by looking at the period in which the reform policy is implemented. Differentiation is measured by investigating the extent to which the reform policy is implemented in such a way that more emphasis on the implementation of the reform is given to teachers and students who need the reform more.
  28. 28. A FRAMEWORK FOR CONDUCTING THEORY-DRIVEN EVALUATIONS: THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE DYNAMIC MODEL1) Reformulate the research questions of stakeholders  Characteristics of the dynamic model  The theory upon which the reform is based.2) Design the evaluation plan  Summative evaluation (short and the long term effect on student outcomes)  Formative evaluation (implementation of the reform)  Use the model to examine variation in the implementation  Evaluate changes in behaviour of teachers and other stakeholders  Search for learning opportunities offered to students and other stakeholders
  29. 29. A FRAMEWORK FOR CONDUCTING THEORY-DRIVEN EVALUATIONS: THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE DYNAMIC MODEL 3) Collecting and analysing data Use multilevel approaches Develop instruments based on the framework of the dynamic model 4) Reporting to policy makers and other stakeholders 5) Draw implications for the development of the evaluation framework The dynamic model could contribute to the improvement of quality in education by establishing an evidence-based and theory-driven approach.
  30. 30. Thanks for being attentive …

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