CFA for Coaches and Administrators Day One

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CFA for Coaches and Administrators Day One

  1. 1. Classroom Formative Assessment for Coaches and Administrators Day One<br /><ul><li>We will be able to describe the very big picture for the district and for our school: how classroom formative assessment connects with everything we do, including but not limited to:
  2. 2. The 27J Instructional Model
  3. 3. PLCs
  4. 4. PSTs
  5. 5. Professional development
  6. 6. Staff meetings
  7. 7. SIP
  8. 8. PBS
  9. 9. Professional growth plans
  10. 10. Teacher evaluation
  11. 11. Grading and reporting
  12. 12. We will start thinking about change in the district and in schools, and explore constructs that may help us with planning and execution.
  13. 13. 7:30Refreshments8:00Introduction Norms for the dayThe targetHistory and backgroundELTs27J Instructional ModelCFA8:30Webbing activity: making connections to classroom formative assessment 8:50Gallery Walk9:00Reflection9:30Break9:45Moving toward a district-wide vision for good instructionChange begins with me10:15Tacit knowledge is important10:45Feedback is crucial11:15Success and confidence are inextricably linked11:45Lunch12:30The mock classroom3:00Debrief, reflection, implications for next steps3:30Dismiss</li></ul>_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________<br />s<br />Student Achievement Plan<br />07-0808-0909-1010-1111-1212-13CurriculumCurriculum Committees write ELTsMonitor viabilityBegin vertical articulation Deconstructing Success Criteria and matching with instructional materialsContinue revision of ELTsReadingMathWritingContinue revision of ELTsScienceHealthSocial studiesContinue revision of ELTsWorld LanguagesArtPEMusicTechnologyInstructionIntroduction of Instructional Model and CASLMaking connection between Instructional Model, Classroom Assessment for Student Learning, and Seven StrategiesFocus on clarity of targetImplement Reader’s JourneyFocus on using exemplars and descriptive feedback[Begin progress monitoring?]Setting goals Progress monitoring5, 6, 7?InterventionImplement R180Plan replacement of CompassRedesign support services (align with interventions, progress monitoring, and instructional model)Implement support service redesign (link to redesign in 09-10 and problem-solving model)CollaborationWrite ELTsWork with departments on clarity of targetBuild capacity for data-driven conversations throughout the organizationBuild connection between data-driven dialogue and interventionsAssessmentDevelop assessment frameworkDevelop mega-spreadsheetProblem-solving model designImplement problem-solving modelWrite common assessmentsReadingWritingMathTask force on grading and reportingLeadershipCommunicate vision for ELTs as goal for all students and Instructional Model as vehicle for implementationVision of good instructionCommunicate importance of clarity of targetLink between Instructional Model and CFALearning walksMonitor clarity of targetCommunicate importance of students monitoring own comprehensionProfessional DevelopmentCohort of key staff trained in Classroom Assessment for Student LearningAll building faculties exposed to ELTs and Instructional ModelLETRSNew Teacher NetworkTools for TeachingCFA training forEarly adoptersA TeamLeadership teamsCommon Assessment Leadership TeamEstablish learning labsLETRSInstructional Assistant TrainingCFA training forELLSpecial educationCareer and Tech EducationTech tools and systems to support CFALETRSPLCs/use of common assessmentsAdditional training for Common Assessment Leadership Team<br />WEB<br />Reflection<br />I was surprised by…<br />The strongest component of our web was…<br />I’m not sure how to connect…<br />My next action may be…<br />I wish I could get a good answer to these questions…<br />I want to ask the teachers I work with…<br />If only…<br />______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________<br />Change<br />_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________<br />Nonaka’s Knowledge Conversion and the Knowledge Spiral<br />ToTacit knowledgeExplicit knowledgeFromSharing experienceTacit knowledgeSocializationDialogueSympathized knowledgeExternalizationNetworkingConceptual knowledgeExplicit knowledgeLearning by doingInternalizationOperational knowledgeCombinationSystemic knowledge<br />The four modes of knowledge conversion and the knowledge spiral ADDIN EN.CITE <EndNote><Cite><Author>Nonaka</Author><Year>2007</Year><RecNum>178</RecNum><record><rec-number>178</rec-number><foreign-keys><key app=" EN" db-id=" 0wzsp9e2uex0v0edrepxzrvw2xsxexd9pz5f" >178</key></foreign-keys><ref-type name=" Journal Article" >17</ref-type><contributors><authors><author>Nonaka, I.</author></authors></contributors><titles><title>The knowledge-creating company</title><secondary-title>Harvard Business Review</secondary-title></titles><periodical><full-title>Harvard Business Review</full-title></periodical><pages>162-171</pages><volume>85</volume><number>7, 8</number><dates><year>2007</year></dates><urls></urls></record></Cite></EndNote>(Nonaka, 2007). Diagram by Wiliam ADDIN EN.CITE <EndNote><Cite ExcludeAuth=" 1" ><Author>Wiliam</Author><Year>2008</Year><RecNum>102</RecNum><record><rec-number>102</rec-number><foreign-keys><key app=" EN" db-id=" 0wzsp9e2uex0v0edrepxzrvw2xsxexd9pz5f" >102</key></foreign-keys><ref-type name=" Journal Article" >17</ref-type><contributors><authors><author>Wiliam, Dylan</author></authors></contributors><titles><title>What should education research do, and how should it do it?</title><secondary-title>Educational Researcher</secondary-title></titles><periodical><full-title>Educational Researcher</full-title></periodical><pages>432-438</pages><volume>37</volume><number>7</number><dates><year>2008</year></dates><urls></urls></record></Cite></EndNote>(2008).<br />The Spiral of Knowledge<br />From Tacit to Tacit: Socialization<br />When one individual shares knowledge with another through modeling, observation, imitation, and practice. <br />From Tacit to Explicit: Externalization<br />When someone analyzes tacit knowledge and formalizes it into a description, a set of rules, a theory, or principles.<br />From Explicit to Explicit: Combination<br />When someone shares explicit knowledge, through a presentation, a publication, or instruction.<br />From Explicit to Tacit: Internalization<br />When someone takes explicit knowledge that has been shared and uses it as the basis for the development of one’s own tacit knowledge<br />Feedback-Seeking Behavior<br />“Many studies have found that proactive feedback seeking is an important individual resource for employees. Feedback seeking enables employees to clarify their role expectations, evaluate the adequacy and appropriateness of their work behavior, and improve their performance.” ADDIN EN.CITE <EndNote><Cite><Author>VandeWalle</Author><Year>2000</Year><RecNum>331</RecNum><record><rec-number>331</rec-number><foreign-keys><key app=" EN" db-id=" 0wzsp9e2uex0v0edrepxzrvw2xsxexd9pz5f" >331</key></foreign-keys><ref-type name=" Journal Article" >17</ref-type><contributors><authors><author>VandeWalle, D</author><author>Ganesan, S</author><author>Challagalla, GN</author><author>Brown, SP</author></authors></contributors><titles><title>An integrated model of feedback-seeking behavior: Disposition, context, and cognition</title><secondary-title>Journal of Applied Psychology</secondary-title></titles><periodical><full-title>Journal of Applied Psychology</full-title></periodical><pages>996-1003</pages><volume>85</volume><number>6</number><dates><year>2000</year></dates><urls></urls></record></Cite></EndNote>(VandeWalle, Ganesan, Challagalla, & Brown, 2000)<br />“If feedback is an information resource making possible the realization of various goals, the perceived importance of attaining a given goal will affect its perceived value.” ADDIN EN.CITE <EndNote><Cite><Author>Ashford</Author><Year>1986</Year><RecNum>335</RecNum><record><rec-number>335</rec-number><foreign-keys><key app=" EN" db-id=" 0wzsp9e2uex0v0edrepxzrvw2xsxexd9pz5f" >335</key></foreign-keys><ref-type name=" Journal Article" >17</ref-type><contributors><authors><author>Ashford, SJ</author></authors></contributors><titles><title>Feedback-seeking in individual adaptation: A resource perspective</title><secondary-title>The Academy of Management Journal</secondary-title></titles><periodical><full-title>The Academy of Management Journal</full-title></periodical><pages>465-487</pages><volume>29</volume><number>3</number><dates><year>1986</year></dates><urls></urls></record></Cite></EndNote>(Ashford, 1986)<br />Factors that PromoteFactors that Suppress<br /> ADDIN EN.CITE <EndNote><Cite ExcludeAuth=" 1" ><Author>Ingham</Author><RecNum>337</RecNum><record><rec-number>337</rec-number><foreign-keys><key app=" EN" db-id=" 0wzsp9e2uex0v0edrepxzrvw2xsxexd9pz5f" >337</key></foreign-keys><ref-type name=" Web Page" >12</ref-type><contributors><authors><author>Ingham</author><author>Luft</author></authors></contributors><titles><title>Johari Window</title></titles><volume>2009</volume><number>November 13</number><dates></dates><urls><related-urls><url>http://www.businessballs.com/johariwindowmodeldiagramportrait.pdf</url></related-urls></urls></record></Cite></EndNote><br />Confidence<br />Excerpt from Kanter ADDIN EN.CITE <EndNote><Cite ExcludeAuth=" 1" ><Author>Kanter</Author><Year>2006</Year><RecNum>338</RecNum><record><rec-number>338</rec-number><foreign-keys><key app=" EN" db-id=" 0wzsp9e2uex0v0edrepxzrvw2xsxexd9pz5f" >338</key></foreign-keys><ref-type name=" Book" >6</ref-type><contributors><authors><author>Kanter, RM</author></authors></contributors><titles><title>Confidence: How winning streaks and losing streaks begin and end</title></titles><dates><year>2006</year></dates><pub-location>New York</pub-location><publisher>Three Rivers Press</publisher><urls></urls></record></Cite></EndNote>(2006)<br />Cycles of Confidence<br />On the way up, success creates positive momentum. People who believe they are likely to win are also likely to put in the extra effort at difficult moments to ensure that victory. On the way down, failure feeds on itself. As performance starts running on a positive or a negative path, the momentum can be hard to stop. Growth cycles produce optimism, decline cycles produce pessimism. These dispositions help predict the recovery of problem-ridden businesses, low-performing urban schools, or even patients on their deathbeds. We encapsulate this in slogans. When people of groups are “on a roll,” they go “from strength to strength.” “Losers,” on the other hand, seem doomed always to lose, because no one believes in them, no one invests in them, no one helps them improve. That’s how the rich get richer and the poor get poorer—or the sick get sicker, the vulnerable become victims, and things start looking run-down because momentum is running down…<br />As patterns develop, streaks start to run on their own momentum, producing conditions that make further success or failure more likely. Winning creates a positive aura around everything, a “halo” effect that encourages positive team behavior that makes further wins more likely. Winning makes it easier to attract the best talent, the most loyal fans, the biggest revenues to reinvest in perpetuating victory. Losing has a repellent effect. It is harder for the team to bond, harder for it to attract new talent, easier for it to fall behind. Winners get the benefit of the doubt. Losing breeds qualms. In the midst of a winning streak, winners are assumed to have made brilliant moves when perhaps they were just lucky. In the midst of a losing streak, if losers eke out a victory, sometimes they are assumed to have cheated.<br />In short, confidence grows in winning streaks and helps propel a tradition of success. Confidence erodes in losing streaks, and its absence makes it hard to stop losing.<br />Confidence and self-fulfilling prophecies<br />Confidence consists of positive expectations for favorable outcomes. Confidence influences the willingness to invest—to commit money, time, reputation, emotional energy, or other resources—or to withhold or hedge investment. This investment, or its absence, shapes the ability to perform. In that sense, confidence lies at the heart of civilization. Everything about an economy, a society, an organization, or a team depends on it. Every step we take, every investment we make, is based on whether we feel we can count on ourselves and other to accomplish what has been promised. Confidence determines whether our steps—individually or collectively—are tiny and tentative or big and bold…<br />It is human nature to set expectations based on assumptions about whether conditions seem to be improving or deteriorating, about whether the game can be won or will inevitably be lost. We seek patterns and trends even in events that are random, like gamblers who believe that when they hold a few good, hands of cards, they must be “hot,” and that the next hands will be equally good. And for nonrandom activities where human effort and skill make a difference, success and failure easily become self-fulfilling prophecies.<br />Failure and success are not episodes, they are trajectories. They are tendencies, directions, pathways. Each decision, each time at bat, each tennis serve, each business quarter, each school year seems like a new event, but the next performance is shaped by what happened last time out, unless something breaks the streak. The meaning of any particular event is shaped by what’s come before.<br />Winning Streaks and Losing Streaks<br />Illustrate the principles behind winning streaks and losing streaks with stories from your own and others’ experiences.<br />Me<br />Student(s) I’ve worked with<br />A Teacher or Colleague I’ve worked with<br />A Team<br />A School<br />Transfer<br /> ADDIN EN.CITE <EndNote><Cite><Author>Fogarty</Author><Year>2004</Year><RecNum>336</RecNum><record><rec-number>336</rec-number><foreign-keys><key app=" EN" db-id=" 0wzsp9e2uex0v0edrepxzrvw2xsxexd9pz5f" >336</key></foreign-keys><ref-type name=" Book" >6</ref-type><contributors><authors><author>Fogarty, RJ</author><author>Pete, BM</author></authors></contributors><titles><title>A Look at Transfer: Seven Strategies That Work</title></titles><dates><year>2004</year></dates><publisher>Corwin Pr</publisher><urls></urls></record></Cite></EndNote>(Fogarty & Pete, 2004)<br />Overlook<br />Miss appropriate opportunities, overlook, persist in former ways, ignore<br />Duplicate<br />Perform the drill exactly as practiced, use with no changes, copy<br />Replicate<br />Tailor to my content, customize, apply in similar situations<br />Integrate<br />Combine with other ideas and situations, use with a raised consciousness<br />Strategize<br />Carry the strategy to other content, bridge, associate, map<br />Invent<br />Innovate, take ideas beyond the initial concept, risk, diverge, invent<br />References<br /> ADDIN EN.REFLIST Ashford, S. (1986). Feedback-seeking in individual adaptation: A resource perspective. The Academy of Management Journal, 29(3), 465-487.<br />Fogarty, R., & Pete, B. (2004). A Look at Transfer: Seven Strategies That Work: Corwin Pr.<br />Ingham, & Luft. Johari Window Retrieved November 13, 2009, from http://www.businessballs.com/johariwindowmodeldiagramportrait.pdf<br />Kanter, R. (2006). Confidence: How winning streaks and losing streaks begin and end. New York: Three Rivers Press.<br />Nonaka, I. (2007). The knowledge-creating company. Harvard Business Review, 85(7, 8), 162-171.<br />VandeWalle, D., Ganesan, S., Challagalla, G., & Brown, S. (2000). An integrated model of feedback-seeking behavior: Disposition, context, and cognition. Journal of Applied Psychology, 85(6), 996-1003.<br />Wiliam, D. (2008). What should education research do, and how should it do it? Educational Researcher, 37(7), 432-438.<br />

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