IAU_KU_2011_Baryamureeba

503 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
503
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

IAU_KU_2011_Baryamureeba

  1. 1. INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES AND STRATEGIES FOR SECURING EQUITY IN ACCESS & SUCCESS IN HE PROF. VENANSIUS BARYAMUREEBA VC‐MAKERERE UNIVERSITY vc@admin.mak.ac.ug barya@admin.mak.ac.ug
  2. 2. Advent of HE in Africa• HE in Africa was propelled by Colonial  Governments• Intention was to produce appropriate national  Human Resource to replace colonial staff• Many started as affiliate colleges to  established Universities in Europe 
  3. 3. The Context of HE in Africa• Primary source human resource for the civil  service• Mainly supported and funded by central  governments • HE institutions were regarded as “Ivory  Towers”
  4. 4. HE Influencers• Liberalization of economies• Education Support and Funding policy shift i.e.  Supporting lower levels as opposed to HE• Education as commodity as opposed to social  good• Population Increase leading to increase in  demand for HE• Entry of private service providers
  5. 5. The Changing Dynamics• Education qualifications as tradable  commodities led to knowledge economies• HE is more expensive than it were a decade  ago• The HE arena has turned into a market place
  6. 6. The Puzzle...• Increased enrolment at lower levels with limited  access at HE level• Access to HE is on merit in government  institutions but this eliminates the less privileged• The cultural paradigm that segregates around sex • The globalization of economies• The plight of disease burden especially HIV/AIDS
  7. 7. Equitable Access; Issues• Social Inclusion in Higher Education• Investment to facilitate expansion of  resources and facilitate to match demand• Re‐focusing the HE paradigm in the wake of  competing societal demands• Stakeholder management and engagement;  competing stakeholders with specific  demands
  8. 8. Strategies for HE• Strategic Partnerships amongst Institutions of  HE• Re‐engineer the Business Processes in HE• Broaden the resource base• Change management • Appropriate use and integration of ICT’s HE  access
  9. 9. Enabling Equitable Access; FSI• 1.5 extra points awarded to every qualifying female  applicant...this was a result of Affirmative Action Policy  in 1990• Female enrolment increased from 25% in 1990 to 44%  in 2010• Female Scholarship Initiative started in 2001• 691 females have accessed training at Makerere  University, out of 9719 applicants• Female Scholarship Foundation has been established  to sustain the FSI
  10. 10. Conclusion• Higher education needs to be cultivated,  nurtured  • Supported both in terms of creating a  conductive policy environment and • Committing the right resources to deal with the  complexities of issues such as access and  massification, brain drain, staff and student  retention, and infrastructure.
  11. 11. ConclusionTake Action Now!! Knowing is not enough; we must  apply. Willing is not enough; we  must do.  (Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe) 11
  12. 12. Makerere University‐Main  Administrative Building11/22/2011 We Build For the Future 12
  13. 13. CIT BLOCK B‐10,000 SITTING CAPACITY  BUILDING 11/22/2011 We Build For the Future 13
  14. 14. THE 800 SITTING CAPACITY LAB11/22/2011 We Build For the Future 14
  15. 15. Peasant Farmers House using appropriate technologies developed by Fac. Of Tech11/22/2011 We Build For the Future 15
  16. 16. Alumni of FSI
  17. 17. THANK YOU 

×