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2011 Financial English 04

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Banking, Complex Sentences

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2011 Financial English 04

  1. 1. What is a bank for?<br />Why is it important for a city to have a bank?<br />How does a bank work?<br />Discuss with a partner<br />4 minutes<br />
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  4. 4. IELTS Card<br />Tell me about your bank<br />Why are banks important to people in a city? <br />What skills do you need to use a bank account?<br />How does a bank help consumers<br />How does a bank help producers?<br />
  5. 5. Match<br />Transfer<br />Check<br />Order<br />Pay<br />Follow<br />key in<br />Sign<br />Deposit<br />Make<br />pay into<br />a check <br />a PIN number<br />money <br />an account <br />a form<br />bills <br />a statement <br />instructions <br />a balance<br />
  6. 6. Match<br />Transfer C, H<br />Check G, I<br />Order B, G<br />Pay F<br />Follow H<br />key in B<br />Sign A<br />Deposit C, H<br />Make B, D<br />pay into D<br />a check <br />a PIN number<br />money <br />an account <br />a form<br />bills <br />a statement <br />instructions <br />a balance<br />
  7. 7. Banking<br />Opening a bank account<br />Overdraft protection<br />
  8. 8. Writing<br />Summerize in a paragragh<br />
  9. 9. How a Bank Works (Simple)<br />Video<br />Write 10 words you hear<br />
  10. 10. Banking Crisis<br />Video<br />
  11. 11. Corporate Banking<br />Corporate and Investment banking<br />Earn _____<br />Sliding ____<br />Leveraged ____<br />_______ equities<br />Buy ____ a company<br />
  12. 12. 1. The __________ for the dollar is very good just now. We should change dollars into euros today.<br />a) interest rate<br />b) credit rating<br />c) money rate<br />d) exchange rate<br />
  13. 13. 2. My salary always runs out before the end of the month. Everything's so expensive just now. I don't know how I'd manage without __________.<br />a) getting my pocket money from the bank<br />b) lending money to my bank<br />c) having an overdraft<br />d) sticking to my budget<br />
  14. 14. 3. We've found our ideal house but we're not rich enough to be able to buy it straight away. We'll need to go to the bank to see if they'll give us _________.<br />a) interest<br />b) a deposit<br />c) some capital<br />d) a mortgage<br />
  15. 15. 4. We'll need to invest more ___________ if we want to expand our business. You know what they say, you have to spend money to make money.<br />a) return<br />b) capital<br />c) interest rate<br />d) wages<br />
  16. 16. 5. We got a loan from the bank to buy a new car. We have to ___________ it over the next two years.<br />a) repay<br />b) pay<br />c) return<br />d) give<br />
  17. 17. 6. She put all her money in a __________ savings account so she could make as much money as possible from it.<br />a) credit card<br />b) large return<br />c) high interest<br />d) low interest<br />
  18. 18. Dependent Clauses<br />
  19. 19. What is an Adjective?<br />An Adjective describes a noun. Remember nouns can either be subjects, objects or objects of prepositions.<br />Which words are adjectives?<br /><ul><li> unkind
  20. 20. fast
  21. 21. value
  22. 22. careless
  23. 23. silently
  24. 24. old</li></ul>Which words are adjectives?<br /><ul><li> unkind
  25. 25. fast
  26. 26. value
  27. 27. careless
  28. 28. silently
  29. 29. old</li></li></ul><li>What is an Adjective Clause?<br />An Adjective clause is a dependent clause (dependent word + subject and verb) that describes a noun.<br />You can imagine that an adjective clause is taking two sentences about the same noun and making them into one sentence.<br />Examples:<br />Route 66 is a long road.<br />This road goes from Chicago to California.<br />Route 66 is a long road that goes from Chicago to California.<br />Examples: <br />The postcard shows a beautiful vista of the Grecian coastline. <br />I bought the postcard. <br />The postcard which I bought shows a beautiful vista of the Grecian coastline.<br />
  30. 30. Subject Relative Pronouns<br />We use relative pronouns to create dependent clauses.<br />The relative pronoun replaces the word in common between the two sentences. <br />Sometimes, the relative pronoun will be the subject of the dependent clause.<br />Examples:<br />Route 66 is a long road.<br />This roadgoes from Chicago to California.<br />Route 66 is a long road that goes from Chicago to California.<br />Subject Relative Pronouns<br />People: Who or That<br />Things or Animals: Which or That<br />Possessive: Whose<br />
  31. 31. Examples: <br />The postcard shows a beautiful vista of the Grecian coastline. <br />I bought the postcard. <br />The postcard which I bought shows a beautiful vista of the Grecian coastline.<br />Object Relative Pronouns<br />Sometimes, the relative pronoun will replace the object in the dependent clause or the object of a preposition.<br />To connect this type of clause, the relative pronoun must be moved to the front of the clause – in front of the subject.<br />Object Relative Pronouns<br />People: Whom, Who or That<br />Things or Animals: Which or That<br />Possessive: Whose<br />
  32. 32. Things to Remember<br />The relative pronoun replaces the noun – don’t use it and the noun in the dependent clause.<br />Example:<br />The postcard is pretty. I bought the postcard.<br />Incorrect: The postcard which I bought the postcard is pretty.<br />Correct: The postcard which I bought is pretty.<br />The relative pronoun must be next to the word it describes.<br />Example:<br />Incorrect: The sharks opened their mouths while they swam by the boat which were full of sharp teeth.<br />Correct: The sharks opened their mouths which were full of sharp teeth while they swam by the boat.<br />
  33. 33. Things to Remember<br />Formal written English: In formal, academic English in adjective clauses with object relative pronouns, for people, we use whom. In adjective clauses with an object of a preposition, bring the preposition forward and use whom or which.<br />Example: Jack London, whom I admire, wrote a lot of short stories.<br />Rather than: Jack London, who I admire, wrote a lot of short stories.<br />Example: The presidency is the position to which many politicians aspire.<br />Rather than: The presidency is the position that many politicians aspire to.<br />
  34. 34. Things to Remember<br />You must understand whether or not the dependent clause is essential information or extra information in the understanding of the noun. This impacts the meaning and the punctuation.<br />Essential clauses are also called identifying or restrictive. We DO NOT use commas with these clauses.<br />Extra clauses are also called non-identifying or non-restrictive. WE MUST use commas with these clauses. We cannot use the relative pronoun that.<br />
  35. 35. Things to Remember<br />Can you understand a difference between these two sentences?<br />My sister, who lives in Bel Air, has three children.<br />My sister who lives in Bel Air has three children.<br />In which sentence is it clear that I have more than one sister?<br /><ul><li>What about between these two sentences?
  36. 36. He looked in the refrigerator, and he threw away the food which was rotten.
  37. 37. He looked in the refrigerator, and he threw away the food, which was rotten.</li></ul>In which sentence is all of the food in the refrigerator rotten?<br />
  38. 38. Identifying vs. Non-Identifying<br />Think about if a listener or reader would be able to identify the noun without the adjective clause.<br />Example:<br />He is the man who works at the grocery store.<br />This is essential (identifying) information. Think about it as two sentences.<br />He is a man.<br />He works at the grocery store.<br />Without the second sentence, you couldn’t identify him.<br />Notice that a become the because the noun changes from indefinite to definite because of the identification.<br />
  39. 39. Identifying vs. Non-Identifying<br />Think about if a listener or reader would be able to identify the noun without the adjective clause.<br />Example:<br />Maria, who works as a physician’s assistant, enjoys her job.<br />This is extra (non-identifying) information. Think about it as two sentences.<br />Maria enjoys her job.<br />Maria works as a physician’s assistant.<br />You know her name from the first sentence. This is enough to identify her.<br />
  40. 40.
  41. 41. Commas<br />Commas separate titles or people’s names used in direct address from the rest of the sentence.<br />Commas set off transitional words and phrases from the rest of a sentence.<br />A comma follows a dependent clause that comes before an independent clause.<br />A comma follows a single participle or participial phrase that introduces a sentence.<br />A comma always separates the name of a city from the name of a state (example: Chicago, Illinois).<br />A comma follows a friendly salutation.<br />
  42. 42. Commas<br />A comma usually precedes a coordinating conjunction that separates two independent clauses.<br />Commas separate items in a series.<br />Commas set off appositives from the rest of a sentence.<br />Commas set off non-restrictive phrases because they aren’t necessary to make complete sentences.<br />Commas separate mild interjections from the rest of the sentence.<br />Commas separate titles or people’s names used in direct address from the rest of the sentence.<br />
  43. 43. Colons<br />A colon (:) follows a formal salutation.<br />A colon follows a sentence or phrase that introduces a list.<br />
  44. 44. Semicolons<br />Use a semicolon (;) instead of a conjunction to separate two closely related independent clauses, or sentences.<br />Use semicolons to separate items in a series when commas appear between the semicolons.<br />
  45. 45. Quotation Marks<br />Quotation marks surround the exact words that someone is saying or has spoken.<br />Commas are used to separate a direct quotation from the “he said/she said” part of the sentence.<br />Commas used in a split quotation are “in and then out”—inside the first set of quotes and outside the second.<br />Use quotation marks to indicate shorter works, or parts of works, such as articles, chapters, songs, poems, short stories, and parts of musical compositions.<br />
  46. 46. Italics and Underlining<br />Use italic type or underlining to indicate longer works, such as book titles, magazine titles, and albums.<br />
  47. 47. Put in the right commas<br />First of all the student store will no longer sell water pistols.<br />
  48. 48. Put in the right commas<br />Melvin the class clown ate his notebook.<br />
  49. 49. Put in the right commas<br />Hey Jerry that’s enough yodeling.<br />
  50. 50. Put in the right commas<br />“I love raindrops roses and kittens” Susan gushed romantically “but I hate bright copper kettles.”<br />
  51. 51. Put in the right commas<br />When he was bowling last night Manuel who’s in my gym class dropped the ball on his foot.<br />
  52. 52. Put in the right commas<br />When he was bowling last night Manuel who’s in my gym class dropped the ball on his foot.<br />
  53. 53. Put in the right commas<br />Stacey’s campaign for treasurer was very imaginative but she lost the election.<br />
  54. 54. Sobbing softly Maria told her sad story to the counselor.<br />
  55. 55. Appositive<br />An appositive is a noun or noun phrase that renames another noun right beside it. The appositive can be a short or long combination of words. Look at these examples:<br />The insect, a cockroach, is crawling across the kitchen table.<br />The insect, a large cockroach, is crawling across the kitchen table.<br />The insect, a large cockroach with hairy legs, is crawling across the kitchen table.<br />
  56. 56. Excercise<br />Combine these sentences using appositives. Remember to put commas in the correct places<br />
  57. 57. Barnaby Quip sneezes anytime he hears people abusing the language in their speaking and writing.<br />He is an English linguaphile.<br />
  58. 58. Pablo Picasso was a great artist.<br />He was born in Spain.<br />
  59. 59. Chocolate is my favorite dessert.<br />It gives me the energy to do my homework.<br />

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