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Document Name Here | Month 2016 | Version 1 | Public | Internal Use Only | Confidential | Strictly Confidential (DELETE CL...
2Political Monitor | April 2017 | Final | Public
There is strong support for work visas for the highly skilled
but also in...
3Political Monitor | April 2017 | Final | Public
Majority of the public not convinced that Tories’ pledge on
net migration...
4Political Monitor | April 2017 | Final | Public
Public is unclear on what a ‘sustainable level’ of net
migration should b...
5Political Monitor | April 2017 | Final | Public
Three in 10 think prices would go up if net migration is
reduced signific...
6Political Monitor | April 2017 | Final | Public
But nearly half think prices would rise in industries heavily
reliant on ...
7Political Monitor | April 2017 | Final | Public
The public is split on whether higher prices are worth paying
to reduce i...
www.ipsos-mori.com/
Document Name Here | Month 2016 | Version 1 | Public | Internal Use Only | Confidential | Strictly Con...
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Public Attitudes to Immigration - May 2017

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New polling by Ipsos MORI finds most Britons are pessimistic about Theresa May’s likelihood of success to hit her target to cut net migration to the “tens of thousands” in the next few years. Two in three (68%) say that it is either not at all likely or fairly unlikely that the Conservatives will be able to achieve this target while just 18% think that they will. Nevertheless, when it comes to deciding what a “sustainable” level of net migration should be only one in five (20%) think this is would be 100,000 or above (after being told that it currently stands at 273,000). Half (49%) think it should be 100,000 or less and 30% are unsure.

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Public Attitudes to Immigration - May 2017

  1. 1. Document Name Here | Month 2016 | Version 1 | Public | Internal Use Only | Confidential | Strictly Confidential (DELETE CLASSIFICATION) © 2016 Ipsos. All rights reserved. Contains Ipsos' Confidential and Proprietary information and may not be disclosed or reproduced without the prior written consent of Ipsos. 1 PUBLIC VIEWS ON IMMIGRATION MAY2017
  2. 2. 2Political Monitor | April 2017 | Final | Public There is strong support for work visas for the highly skilled but also in some lower skilled industries Q1. When Britain leaves the European Union, EU citizens will no longer be able to freely come and work in the UK as they do now. Therefore, some people are proposing special work visas to allow some European Union citizens to come and work in Britain after Brexit. Do you think that special work visas should or should not be offered to EU citizens who are coming to Britain to work in the following jobs: 81% 80% 69% 61% 60% 56% 46% 42% 41% 33% 10% 11% 17% 26% 27% 31% 41% 44% 45% 52% 9% 9% 14% 13% 12% 12% 13% 14% 14% 15% Doctors Nurses Academics Computer and software experts Care home workers Seasonal fruit and vegetable pickers Construction labourers (e.g. bricklayers, roofers) Restaurant and catering staff (waiters, waitresses, bartenders) Bankers Baristas (coffee servers) Should Should not Don't know Base: 1061 British adults, aged 18-75 years, surveyed online between 26-28 April 2017
  3. 3. 3Political Monitor | April 2017 | Final | Public Majority of the public not convinced that Tories’ pledge on net migration will be met – even among Tory supporters Q2. Theresa May has pledged that a Conservative government would reduce annual net migration (that is the number of migrants coming into Britain minus the number leaving Britain) to the “tens of thousands”. How likely, if at all, do you think that the Conservatives will meet this target in the next few years if they are re-elected on June 8? Base: 1061 British adults, aged 18-75 years, surveyed online between 26-28 April 2017 13% 7% 9% 11% 10% 3% 8% 1% 2% 5% 15% 27% 4% 11% 21% 37% 47% 32% 41% 37% 31% 10% 54% 36% 28% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Total Conservative Labour Remain Leave Not at all likely Fairly unlikely Fairly likely Very likely Don’t know
  4. 4. 4Political Monitor | April 2017 | Final | Public Public is unclear on what a ‘sustainable level’ of net migration should be - half say less than 100,000 but three in ten ‘don’t know’ Q3. Which of these is closest to your idea of a sustainable level of net migration? 30% 19% 32% 35% 20% 9% 10% 4% 3% 17% 22% 27% 23% 16% 30% 18% 29% 11% 16% 21% 10% 13% 13% 13% 8%6% 1% 9% 10% 2%4% 1% 8% 7% 1% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Total Conservative Labour Remain Leave Over 300,000 Over 200,000 up to 300,000 Over 100,000 up to 200,000 Over 50,000 up to 100,000 Up to 50,000 Zero Don’t know Base: 1061 British adults, aged 18-75 years, surveyed online between 26-28 April 2017
  5. 5. 5Political Monitor | April 2017 | Final | Public Three in 10 think prices would go up if net migration is reduced significantly but two in five think it will make no difference Q4. If net migration is reduced by a large amount, what impact, if any, do you think it will have on the prices of goods and services? Do you think that… 22% 15% 19% 22% 20% 6% 6% 6% 3% 9% 40% 52% 34% 29% 53% 32% 27% 40% 46% 18% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Total Conservative Labour Remain Leave Prices would be higher than they would be otherwise It would make no difference to prices Prices would be lower than they would be otherwise Don’t know Base: 1061 British adults, aged 18-75 years, surveyed online between 26-28 April 2017
  6. 6. 6Political Monitor | April 2017 | Final | Public But nearly half think prices would rise in industries heavily reliant on migrant labour Q5. And if net migration is reduced by a large amount, what impact, if any, do you think it will have on prices for goods and services in industries that employ a lot of migrant workers? For example, on fees for care homes, taxi cab fares and food prices. Do you think that... 21% 13% 17% 17% 20% 5% 4% 3% 4% 6% 30% 37% 25% 18% 43% 45% 46% 55% 61% 31% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Total Conservative Labour Remain Leave Prices would be higher than they would be otherwise It would make no difference to prices Prices would be lower than they would be otherwise Don’t know Base: 1061 British adults, aged 18-75 years, surveyed online between 26-28 April 2017
  7. 7. 7Political Monitor | April 2017 | Final | Public The public is split on whether higher prices are worth paying to reduce immigration Q6. If cutting immigration levels caused price rises, which of these two statements comes closest to your view: 21% 17% 17% 18% 20% 37% 21% 58% 62% 12% 42% 62% 26% 20% 68% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Total Conservative Labour Remain Leave It would be a price worth paying to reduce immigration It would not be a price worth paying to reduce immigration because of the problems it would cause for businesses and consumers Don’t know Base: 1061 British adults, aged 18-75 years, surveyed online between 26-28 April 2017
  8. 8. www.ipsos-mori.com/ Document Name Here | Month 2016 | Version 1 | Public | Internal Use Only | Confidential | Strictly Confidential (DELETE CLASSIFICATION) 8 Gideon Skinner Head of Political Research, Ipsos MORI gideon.skinner@ipsos.com For more information Kully Kaur-Ballagan Research Director kully.kaur-ballagan@ipsos.com Glenn Gottfried Research Manager glenn.gottfried@ipsos.com

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