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Energy policy after the General Election:
Priorities for consumers
Antonia Dickman, Joint Head of Environment Research, Ip...
Government and industry face significant challenges
Low carbon
economy
Energy
security
Climate
change
mitigation
Affordabl...
What I’ll cover today
What do the public think?
• Concerns?
• Priorities?
•What does this mean for
policymakers?
• Priorit...
Base: 513 British adults 18+, 5th – 7th April 2014
Source: Ipsos MORI / Political Monitor
…agree there is currently ‘a
cos...
Public supported price freeze following announcement
I am going to read out a number of policies announced by political pa...
Competitive & transparent industry?
Source: DECC/ Energy UKBase: 2,021 British adults aged 18+ at least partly responsible...
MPs trust industry less in some areas too
2
1
45
47
15
10
3
1
15
25
32
57
59
58
4
3
4
16
21
28
Trust completely Tend to di...
Energy security: a significant public concern
Base:1,822 British adults, aged 15 and over, 6th January-26 March 2010
Suppl...
58
56
50
50
50
42
39
36
36
35
35
33
30
28
27
27
25
23
23
19
12
8
7
4
Sweden
Germany
Great Britain
Japan
USA
South Korea
Au...
Public recognise energy use contributes to climate
change
Base:1,040 UK adults, 2014
Burning coal, oil & gas in
power stat...
Although concern about climate change has been
falling … (until the 2013/14 floods)
82% concerned 60% concerned71% concern...
How accepting are public of policies aiming to meet
goals of security of supply, affordability & climate
change mitigation?
Renewables favoured over fossil fuels, though support
shows signs of decline
33%
34%
34%
49%
59%
64%
72%
77%
36%
33%
34%
5...
Support for tax increases to pay for more renewable
energy
9%
30%
18%
22%
17%
3%
Don’t know Strongly support
Tend to suppo...
On balance public likely to support replacing our nuclear power
stations, but some work to be done to convince more
42%
su...
How willing are public to act themselves?
“Mainly responsible for ensuring appropriate changes are made to UK energy
system over next 40 years”
Responsibility firml...
I think there is more I could do to
reduce the amount of energy I
use at home
I have tried to reduce the amount
of energy ...
Smart meters expected to help households budget &
avoid wasted energy use
Source: DECC/ Ipsos MORI
Base: 2,210 British adu...
…automatically
turning off if left on
standby for long
time
…turning off after set
period of time (e.g. 10
mins)
…switched...
Gas is still the default option for heating our homes
If you were going to replace your current heating system, what types...
22
With many consumers unaware of lower carbon options
14%
17%
53%
53%
68%
69%
73%
Gas Condensing Boiler
Solar thermal
Gro...
Challenges for
policymakers
41
34
30
20
18
16
15
13
12
11
Base: 966 British adults 18+, 6th – 15th February 2015 Source: Ipsos MORI Issues Index
Energ...
Base: representative sample of c.1,000 British adults age 18+ each month, interviewed face-to-face in home Source: Ipsos M...
How much, if anything, have you heard or read about the following energy
technologies?
Base: 428 UK adults aged 16+
Energy...
To what extent do you support or oppose the development of the following
energy technologies in the UK?
…but that doesn’t ...
What would you say are the main benefits/risks, if any, of fracking to extract
shale gas?
Base: 315 adults who have heard ...
29
90%
86%
83%
67%
62%
55%
51%
32%
22%
19%
16%
8%
11%
14%
27%
30%
38%
37%
62%
72%
76%
80%
2%
3%
4%
6%
8%
7%
14%
6%
6%
5%
4...
Public would like our future energy system to involve…
• A secure supply – with mix likely to include renewables & nuclear...
Version 1 | Public
Paste co-
brand logo
here
Antonia Dickman, Joint Head of Environment Research, Ipsos MORI
020 7347 3157...
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Energy Policy after the UK General Election: Priorities for consumers

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As the 2015 General Election approaches, attention is turning to the different ways in which the challenges facing the UK energy system might be addressed and how the next Government might achieve a secure, affordable and sustainable energy supply. The Environment Research team at Ipsos MORI has undertaken research into these challenges for a range of clients from Academics to Government and the Energy Industry. Antonia Dickman, joint head of Ipsos MORI’s Environment research team, shared some of her insights from this research as part of the Parliamentary Group for Energy Studies speaker meeting series.

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Energy Policy after the UK General Election: Priorities for consumers

  1. 1. Energy policy after the General Election: Priorities for consumers Antonia Dickman, Joint Head of Environment Research, Ipsos MORI 02/03/2015
  2. 2. Government and industry face significant challenges Low carbon economy Energy security Climate change mitigation Affordable supply Competitive, transparent energy industry
  3. 3. What I’ll cover today What do the public think? • Concerns? • Priorities? •What does this mean for policymakers? • Priorities going forwards? • Messaging?
  4. 4. Base: 513 British adults 18+, 5th – 7th April 2014 Source: Ipsos MORI / Political Monitor …agree there is currently ‘a cost of living crisis’ in the UK (82%) Affordability: …are concerned about their household energy bills (84%) Source: Ipsos MORI / DECC Base: GB adults aged 18+ who are at least partly responsible for paying household energy bills: (2,159) 5th and 20th October 2012 Four in five …
  5. 5. Public supported price freeze following announcement I am going to read out a number of policies announced by political parties. Which two or three, if any, of the following do you think would be… Source: Ipsos MORI Political Monitor Base: 1,004 British adults 18+, 12th -15th October 2013, split sample question- approximately half (c.500) the sample were asked each iteration 33% 33% 41% 44% 44% 50% 22% 23% 29% 40% 56% 62% 25 hours of free childcare per week A government scheme to guarantee mortgages for people buying a home with a deposit between 5% and 20% Free school meals for all children aged under eight Raising the income tax threshold so that no-one earning the minimum wage pays income tax A freeze on petrol duty for the next 18 months A freeze on gas and electricity prices for 20 months …best for me personally …best for the country
  6. 6. Competitive & transparent industry? Source: DECC/ Energy UKBase: 2,021 British adults aged 18+ at least partly responsible for paying household energy bills, August/September 2014 % trusting their supplier to… …provide them with value for money – 45% … be open and transparent – 50%
  7. 7. MPs trust industry less in some areas too 2 1 45 47 15 10 3 1 15 25 32 57 59 58 4 3 4 16 21 28 Trust completely Tend to distrustTend to trust Distrust completely Q Could you please tell me the extent to which you trust or distrust energy companies in general to do each of the following: Base: All MPs (93), Conservative MPs (38), Labour MPs (44) and Liberal Democrat MPs (8) asked, summer 2012 Keep the lights on in Britain, now & in the future Protect poor & vulnerable from high energy prices Move as quickly as possible towards lower carbon generation methods Offer genuine competition Promote energy efficiency & insulation Provide clear information so customers can choose between suppliers
  8. 8. Energy security: a significant public concern Base:1,822 British adults, aged 15 and over, 6th January-26 March 2010 Supplies of fossil fuels (e.g. coal and gas) will run out The UK will become too dependent on energy from other countries % Concerned that in the future… Source: Ipsos MORI / Cardiff University 78% 81%
  9. 9. 58 56 50 50 50 42 39 36 36 35 35 33 30 28 27 27 25 23 23 19 12 8 7 4 Sweden Germany Great Britain Japan USA South Korea Australia South Africa Spain Belgium Italy Canada Poland France China Turkey Hungary Argentina Indonesia Saudi Arabia India Mexico Russia Brazil Base: Between 500-1010 respondents per country, February 2 - 14 2011 What are the three most important environmental issues in your country? % Future energy sources and supplies Source: Ipsos Global @dvisor Brits care more than most about energy security
  10. 10. Public recognise energy use contributes to climate change Base:1,040 UK adults, 2014 Burning coal, oil & gas in power stations to produce electricity % in UK thinking that each activity contributes to climate change a lot / moderate amount… Source: Ipsos MORI / Chatham House 85%Industry & manufacturing e.g. production of goods 80% 87% Heating & cooling our homes and offices
  11. 11. Although concern about climate change has been falling … (until the 2013/14 floods) 82% concerned 60% concerned71% concerned 2005 2010 2013 Base: 2014: 1,002 British adults, 28th August – 31st October 2013: 973 Great British adults, aged 15 and over, 8th - 26th March 2013; 2010: 1,822 Great British adults, aged 15 and over, 6th January - 26th March 2010; 2005: 1,491 Great British adults, aged 15 and over, 1st October – 6th November 2005. Methodology: face-to-face in-home Source: Ipsos MORI/Cardiff University 68% concerned 2014
  12. 12. How accepting are public of policies aiming to meet goals of security of supply, affordability & climate change mitigation?
  13. 13. Renewables favoured over fossil fuels, though support shows signs of decline 33% 34% 34% 49% 59% 64% 72% 77% 36% 33% 34% 57% 56% 82% 76% 88% 20132010 Solar Hydro Wind Gas Biomass Nuclear Oil Coal Bases: 2013: 973 British adults, aged 15 and over, 8th - 26th March 2013; 2010: 1,822 British adults, aged 15 and over, 6th January - 26th March 2010 % Very/fairly favourable Source: Ipsos MORI / Cardiff University
  14. 14. Support for tax increases to pay for more renewable energy 9% 30% 18% 22% 17% 3% Don’t know Strongly support Tend to support Neither support nor oppose Tend to oppose Strongly oppose 40% support 39% oppose Source: Ipsos MORI / Cardiff University Base: 1,002 British adults, 28th August – 31st October 2014
  15. 15. On balance public likely to support replacing our nuclear power stations, but some work to be done to convince more 42% support 33% oppose 55% agree “if we had safer nuclear power stations, I’d be prepared to support new ones being built” Q. To what extent do you support or oppose the building of new nuclear power stations in Britain to replace those being phased out over the next few years? This would ensure that the previous proportion of nuclear energy is retained. Base: 973 British adults, aged 15 and over, 8th - 26th March 2013 Source: Ipsos MORI / Cardiff University
  16. 16. How willing are public to act themselves?
  17. 17. “Mainly responsible for ensuring appropriate changes are made to UK energy system over next 40 years” Responsibility firmly placed on Government Source: Energy Systems, Ipsos MORI / Cardiff University/UKERC, 2013Base: 2,441 British adults, aged 15 and over, 2nd-12th August 2012 54%
  18. 18. I think there is more I could do to reduce the amount of energy I use at home I have tried to reduce the amount of energy I use at home 59% 74% We do have aspirations to reduce our energy use Source: DECC / Ipsos MORIBase: 2,210 British adults aged 18+ at least partly responsible for paying household energy bills, 5th April – 2nd May 2013 3rd statement: Base: 1,002 British adults, 28th August – 31st October 2014 Likely to buy more energy efficient appliances84% Source: Cardiff University / Ipsos MORI
  19. 19. Smart meters expected to help households budget & avoid wasted energy use Source: DECC/ Ipsos MORI Base: 2,210 British adults aged 18+ at least partly responsible for paying household energy bills, 5th April – 2nd May 2013 What, if anything, do you think you would benefit from if you had a smart meter installed in your home? (spontaneous)
  20. 20. …automatically turning off if left on standby for long time …turning off after set period of time (e.g. 10 mins) …switched off by electricity network operator for short periods of time But concerns about getting too “smart” % Acceptable % Unacceptable Source: Cardiff University / Ipsos MORI Base: 2,441 British adults, aged 15 and over, 2nd-12th August 2012
  21. 21. Gas is still the default option for heating our homes If you were going to replace your current heating system, what types of heating system would you consider to heat both your home and hot water? Base: All GB homeowners aged 18+ who do not currently heat their home mainly using a GSHP, ASHP, biomass boiler or heat network (2,848), 28th August to 14th October 2012 Source: More Efficient Heating Study, Ipsos MORI / DECC, 2013 3% 81% 3%
  22. 22. 22 With many consumers unaware of lower carbon options 14% 17% 53% 53% 68% 69% 73% Gas Condensing Boiler Solar thermal Ground Source Heat Pump Biomass boiler Air Source Heat Pump Heat network Micro-CHP Source: Ipsos MORI/DECC More Efficient Heating Study, 28th August to 14th Oct 2012 Base: All GB homeowners aged 18+ (2,900) % Never heard of Which of the following best describes the extent to which you had heard of each of these ways of heating your home and/or hot water before today?
  23. 23. Challenges for policymakers
  24. 24. 41 34 30 20 18 16 15 13 12 11 Base: 966 British adults 18+, 6th – 15th February 2015 Source: Ipsos MORI Issues Index Energy competing against many other issues What do you see as the most/other important issues facing Britain today? Top mentions % Immigration/Immigrants Economy Defence/Foreign affairs/Terrorism Unemployment NHS Education/schools Low pay/minimum wages/fair pay Poverty/inequality Housing Crime/Law and Order/ASB % Environment – 5%
  25. 25. Base: representative sample of c.1,000 British adults age 18+ each month, interviewed face-to-face in home Source: Ipsos MORI Issues Index Concern about the environment similar now compared to before 2010 election What do you see as the most/other important issues facing Britain today? 0 5 10 15 20 May 1997 May 1998 May 1999 May 2000 May 2001 May 2002 May 2003 May 2004 May 2005 May 2006 May 2007 May 2008 May 2009 May 2010 May 2011 May 2012 May 2013 May 2014 Cameron’s “Vote Blue, go Green” campaign at 2006 local elections Buncefield Oil Depot fire – toxic cloud reaches northern Spain Wettest Autumn since records began – widespread flooding across the UK EC proposes carbon emission cuts of 20% by 2020 Stern Review on climate change Cameron becomes PM Flooding in England
  26. 26. How much, if anything, have you heard or read about the following energy technologies? Base: 428 UK adults aged 16+ Energy is an issue people are hearing about… 95 77 55 Source: Ipsos MORI Public Attitudes to Science
  27. 27. To what extent do you support or oppose the development of the following energy technologies in the UK? …but that doesn’t always lead to favourable opinions 11 7 34 76 51 36 Base: 428 UK adults aged 16+ Source: Ipsos MORI Public Attitudes to Science
  28. 28. What would you say are the main benefits/risks, if any, of fracking to extract shale gas? Base: 315 adults who have heard of fracking to extract shale gas N.B. word clouds are illustrative of data, not statistically representative; only codes registering 2% or more are shown Depends on messages getting through Source: Ipsos MORI Public Attitudes to Science
  29. 29. 29 90% 86% 83% 67% 62% 55% 51% 32% 22% 19% 16% 8% 11% 14% 27% 30% 38% 37% 62% 72% 76% 80% 2% 3% 4% 6% 8% 7% 14% 6% 6% 5% 4% Doctors Teachers Scientists TV newsreaders Man/woman in the street Civil servants Pollsters Business leaders Journalists Government ministers Politicians generally Tell the truth Not tell the truth Don't know And who is delivering the message Source: Ipsos MORI Veracity Index, December 2014 Base: All GB adults aged 15+ (1,166), Now I will read you a list of different types of people. For each would you tell me if you generally trust them to tell the truth or not?
  30. 30. Public would like our future energy system to involve… • A secure supply – with mix likely to include renewables & nuclear • An affordable supply & fair pricing from suppliers But significant challenges remain… • Responsibility firmly placed on Government • Concerns around impact of cost of changes on households • Mixed picture on opinions of different energy sources • Opinions greatly influenced by message and messenger Some clear preferences, but also some challenges
  31. 31. Version 1 | Public Paste co- brand logo here Antonia Dickman, Joint Head of Environment Research, Ipsos MORI 020 7347 3157; antonia.dickman@ipsos.com 2nd March 2015 Energy policy after the General Election: Priorities for consumers

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