General Practice in
Ireland 2013- from the
perspective of training
and recently qualified GPs
by Dr Aifric Boylan
GP and m...
Introduction
 My training
 Cost of training a GP ? Probably
substantially over 200,000 euro in total
 Importance of tra...
primary care represents best value for the
state and the taxpayer
 Requires well trained, properly distributed
workforce ...
Pre-existing Shortfalls
 Low number of GPs per capita, one of the lowest
in the OECD, with approximately two thirds the
n...
Approximately 47% of Irish trained
doctors do not work in Ireland, which is
higher than all countries in the OECD.
 Neare...


A survey in 2012 showed that 66% of
final medical students did not intend to
work in Irish hospitals once their intern
...







13% definitely will or already have emigrated
23% possibly emigrate
6% change of career
7% don’t know
Potenti...









Major sources of stress
1: feeling undervalued by the state -69%
strongly agreed
2: feeling unfairly target...
So who are we losing?











Summary
Investment in Primary Care and General Practice
clearly identified as a key factor in developing...


We can conclude that our young doctors would be
more likely to stay if they felt supported and valued
by the state.


...
Dr Aifric boylan, Council Member NAGP
Dr Aifric boylan, Council Member NAGP
Dr Aifric boylan, Council Member NAGP
Dr Aifric boylan, Council Member NAGP
Dr Aifric boylan, Council Member NAGP
Dr Aifric boylan, Council Member NAGP
Dr Aifric boylan, Council Member NAGP
Dr Aifric boylan, Council Member NAGP
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Dr Aifric boylan, Council Member NAGP

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Dr Aifric boylan, Council Member NAGP

  1. 1. General Practice in Ireland 2013- from the perspective of training and recently qualified GPs by Dr Aifric Boylan GP and member of the executive committee of the NAGP
  2. 2. Introduction  My training  Cost of training a GP ? Probably substantially over 200,000 euro in total  Importance of training and retaining GPs as cornerstone of primary care provision 
  3. 3. primary care represents best value for the state and the taxpayer  Requires well trained, properly distributed workforce of GPs  At present approximately 160 GPs complete training schemes nationwide per year 
  4. 4. Pre-existing Shortfalls  Low number of GPs per capita, one of the lowest in the OECD, with approximately two thirds the numbers of GP per capita as compared with most European countries in 2007.  Research by the ESRI in 2008 “a profound and worsening problem of distribution of GPs across the country”.  An ICGP Manpower study of just over 1000 GPs in 2008 showed that 50% of respondents expected to retire by 2020. Furthermore, 27% of those doctors had closed their lists to new patients as they were overloaded with work, and that was before the economic collapse 88% of these GPs said levels of GPs insufficient in their areas to meet demand, and 62% had difficulty recruiting GPs to work for them
  5. 5. Approximately 47% of Irish trained doctors do not work in Ireland, which is higher than all countries in the OECD.  Nearest country to us is Luxembourg at 17%  UK only 6% 
  6. 6.  A survey in 2012 showed that 66% of final medical students did not intend to work in Irish hospitals once their intern year was complete
  7. 7.       13% definitely will or already have emigrated 23% possibly emigrate 6% change of career 7% don’t know Potential loss to system of up to 50% ?6.4million worth of trained GPs per year if we take the most conservative figure of 20% lost
  8. 8.       Major sources of stress 1: feeling undervalued by the state -69% strongly agreed 2: feeling unfairly targeted by media- 59% strongly agreed 3:Difficulties accessing hospital/tertiary care for patients 51% strongly agreed Followed by feeling overworked, feeling underpaid, inadequate facilities, and negative effect on social and family life Only 15% reported stress from feeling they’d made wrong career choice
  9. 9. So who are we losing?
  10. 10.        Summary Investment in Primary Care and General Practice clearly identified as a key factor in developing an economical and effective health service Retaining our high quality young GPs is a fundamental necessity to instigate this Our young doctors are stressed and disillusioned Investment in general practice by the state was the biggest factor that would change an emigrating doctors mind, followed by clear career path and pay. The sense of being undervalued by the state and unfairly targeted by the media were the biggest stress on young GPs Nevertheless most trainees and recently qualified GPs still happy they made the career choice
  11. 11.  We can conclude that our young doctors would be more likely to stay if they felt supported and valued by the state.  In a time when money is short, we may have difficulty offering financial incentive to them, but the above study demonstrates that pay is not the most important reason for disillusionment   demonstrate to these young doctors, that they are valued, and that solutions can be found through genuine conversation.  Barriers that have been created in the past such as competition authority should not prevent this  Taking an interest in recently qualified GPs, indeed all GPs, investing in primary care will benefit the entire system and thus the Irish people

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