Sports Knee Specialist’s                    Clinical Blueprint I: Task And Demand Needs-Analysis For      Knee Injury Prev...
Integrated Physiotherapy and Conditioning                                 on     With Free Exercise And Sports Rehabilitat...
Copyright Notice    © Nicholas Clark, BEd, BSc, PG Dip, MSc, MCSP, MMACP, CSCS.                            2001–Present.Th...
Nicholas Clark, BEd, BSc, PG Dip, MSc, MCSP, MMACP, CSCS.                                           Knee Consultant Physio...
Selected Research, Publications, Book Chapters, PresentationsClark, N. (2011) Training the Airborne Tactical Athlete for E...
Sports-Specific Task and Demand Needs-AnalysisName:                                      Sex (M/F):                       ...
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Sports-Specific Task and Demand Needs-Analysis

  1. 1. Sports Knee Specialist’s Clinical Blueprint I: Task And Demand Needs-Analysis For Knee Injury Prevention AndPerformance Optimization Programmes 2nd Edition Nicholas Clark, BEd, BSc, PG Dip, MSc, MCSP, MMACP, CSCS Knee Consultant Physiotherapist Lower Limb Injury Prevention & Rehabilitation Consultant Lower Limb Extended Scope Practitioner Clinical Specialist Sports & Military Physiotherapist Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist Integrated Physiotherapy & Conditioning Ltd United Kingdom www.integratedphysiotherapy.com enquiries@integratedphysiotherapy.com
  2. 2. Integrated Physiotherapy and Conditioning on With Free Exercise And Sports Rehabilitation Manual For You www.integratedphysiotherapy.com Integrated Physiotherapy and Conditioning onWith Free Knee Injury Prevention And Rehabilitation Downloads For You Go Here Now on Go Here Now To Join And Get Exclusive Access on Go Here Now To Join And Get Exclusive Access
  3. 3. Copyright Notice © Nicholas Clark, BEd, BSc, PG Dip, MSc, MCSP, MMACP, CSCS. 2001–Present.The author retains complete and unconditional copyright of thisdocument. Absolutely no part of this document may be reproduced ortransmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical,including e-mail, photocopy, photography, recording, or any informationstorage and retrieval system, without express permission in writingfrom the author. Unauthorized forwarding of this document via e-mail isconsidered a breach of International Copyright Law. i
  4. 4. Nicholas Clark, BEd, BSc, PG Dip, MSc, MCSP, MMACP, CSCS. Knee Consultant Physiotherapist. Lower Limb Injury Prevention & Rehabilitation Consultant. Lower Limb Extended Scope Practitioner. Clinical Specialist Military & Sports Physiotherapist. Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist. Co-Founder & Chair (2001-2009), Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Exercise Therapy. I first becam e interested in the hum an body m ore than 20 years ago after I completely dislocated my leftacromioclavicular joint playing football on a cold, rainy Sunday morning in London. I was immediately admitted to my localhospital and had two complex surgeries over two months. After my first operation, I can remember lying in pain in my hospitalbed, feeling afraid and wondering whether I would ever get the use of my arm back again. It was then that I met aPhysiotherapist for the first time. She skilfully guided me through months of rehabilitation and helped me get back to fullfunction. Because I wanted to learn about what had happened to me, I got my hands on every anatomy and sports injuriestextbook I could find. And my interest in the human musculoskeletal system began. Five years later after I completed my Physical Education degree and became a YMCA Gym Instructor and PersonalTrainer, I began my Physiotherapy undergraduate studies. I wanted to learn as much as I could as fast as I could. I wanted tounderstand what I was doing “to” a patient. And I wanted to be confident that my treatments were as safe as they could be.Then I started to go on my Orthopaedic and Outpatient Student Clinical Placements in London, and got very confused very fast. I ’d see tw o patients on the sam e Orthopaedic W ard w ho had had the sam e operation by differentSurgeons , and the different Surgeons would dictate different rehabilitation programmes for the same operation. I’d have to besure I treated the right patient with the right Surgeon’s rehabilitation programme or I was in real trouble. In PhysiotherapyOutpatients Departments I’d hear experienced clinicians disagreeing about how to treat low back pain, knee pain, and shoulderpain. Some of my Clinical Educators would tell me a low back, knee, or shoulder exercise was essential for a specific injury butthen be unable to explain how it was thought to work, or, more specifically, why it was so important, other than to say thatanother clinician somewhere else in the World had said so. And so it became difficult for me to accept what I heard from acolleague or listened to in a presentation simply on face value alone. I’d keep an open mind and research things further myself.I’d form my own opinion grounded in pathology, anatomy, biomechanics, and neurophysiology – in evidence-based practice. Since that tim e I’ve completed a Post-Graduate Diploma in Clinical Biomechanics and a Master’s degree in AdvancedManual Therapy, and gained more than 12 years of clinical experience in the United Kingdom (UK) including work at the RoyalFree Hospital NHS Trust, Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, East & North Hertfordshire NHS Trust, Saracens RugbyUnion Football Club, and dance and sports injury private practice at Integrated Physiotherapy and Conditioning in London. M y m ilitary ex perience has included working as a Clinical Specialist with the Parachute Regiment and 16 AirAssault Brigade at Colchester Garrison PCRF and RRU and redesigning the Physiotherapy Outpatients service for the Infantryand Armoured Regiments at Tidworth Garrison PCRF, contracted teaching work for Exercise Rehabilitation Instructors andPhysiotherapists for the Ministry of Defence ((MOD) Directorate of Defence Rehabilitation) in the UK, and research with bothregular Armed Forces and Special Operations Forces. I ’ve also had the privilege of being a Visiting Lecturer and External Examiner to the long-standing MSc ManualTherapy and MSc Sports Physiotherapy programmes at University College London (UCL, UK) and King’s College London (KCL,UK), and the BSc Sport Rehabilitation programme at the London Sport Institute at Middlesex University (UK). I’ve also beeninvited to be a Content Consultant to Physiotherapy and Sports Rehabilitation Master’s degree programmes at the University ofHertfordshire (UK) and the University of Salford (UK), and have served as a Manuscript Reviewer for Physical Therapy in SportJournal (UK), The Knee Journal (UK), the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy (United States (US)), and aResearch Grant Reviewer for the Physiotherapy Research Foundation (UK). Other roles I’ve been invited to fulfil have includedbeing a Visiting Lecturer to the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), a Clinical Supervisor and Clinical Examiner for theMusculoskeletal Association of Chartered Physiotherapists (MACP, UK), and a Rehabilitation Consultant for the British MOD. Currently I ’m com pleting m y P hD in R ehabilitation Science being engaged in cutting-edge research inproprioception and neuromuscular control in knee injury prevention and lower limb performance optimization. After more than20 years of personal study and extensive real-world practical experience I’ve assembled the most up-to-date and usefulresearch and effective practical techniques into every aspect of my work. And now I can show you how to quickly and easilyimplement cutting-edge scientific evidence, practical techniques, and clinical systems into your practice tomorrow, in a way thatquickly gets you your best possible practical results while saving you time and effort, and rapidly increasing your patients’ andclients’ health, satisfaction, and success. © Copyright Nicholas Clark, BEd, BSc, PG Dip, MSc, MCSP, MMACP, CSCS. 2008.
  5. 5. Selected Research, Publications, Book Chapters, PresentationsClark, N. (2011) Training the Airborne Tactical Athlete for Enhanced Function and Combat Readiness. Invited PlatformPresentation. United Kingdom Sports and Exercise Medicine (UKSEM) Annual Conference. London, England, UK.Clark, N. Herrington, L. (2010) The Knee. In- Sports Rehabilitation and Injury Prevention. (Editors- P. Comfort,E. Abrahamson). Wiley Publishers. Chichester. United Kingdom.Clark, N. (2008). Strength Training Programme Design in Physiotherapy Practice: What You Need to Know. KeynotePresentation. Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Exercise Therapy (ACPET) 3rd Exercise Therapy Symposium.University of Hertfordshire. Hertfordshire. UK.Clark, N. (2007). Defining Skeletal Muscle Performance and Essential Variables in Strength Training Programme Design.Keynote Presentation. Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Exercise Therapy (ACPET) 1st Exercise Therapy Symposium.University College London. London. UK.Clark, N. (2006). Clinical Plyometrics in Knee Injury Rehabilitation: Basic Science and Practical Applications. KeynotePresentation. British Association of Sports Rehabilitators and Trainers (BASRaT) Annual Clinical Symposium. The CentennialCentre. Birmingham. UK.Clark, N. (2006) Clinical Application of Biomechanical Concepts for the Understanding and Treatment of a Unilateral MedialTibial Stress Fracture in a British Soldier. Invited Platform Presentation. Staffordshire University Tissue Stress Conference.Staffordshire University. UK.Clark, N. (2006) Unilateral Post-Traumatic Leg-Length Discrepancy Causing Contralateral Hip Arthropathy - A Case Study in aBritish Soldier. Invited Platform Presentation. Staffordshire University Tissue Stress Conference. Staffordshire University. UK.Clark, N. (2006) Advanced Techniques in Lower Limb Exercise Therapy: Clinical Plyometrics for Enhancing Biomechanics andNeuromuscular Control of the Knee. Guest Lecture. London Sport Institute. Middlesex University and University College London.London. UK.Clark, N. (2005) Relationship Between Active Hamstring Stretch Reflex Latency and Functional Knee Stability. ManipulationAssociation of Chartered Physiotherapists 2005 Research Presentation Award. 2nd International Conference on MovementDysfunction. Kinetic Control and Manipulation Association of Chartered Physiotherapists. Edinburgh International ConventionCentre. Edinburgh. UK.Clark, N. (2004) Principles of Injury Rehabilitation. SportEX Medicine. 19, 6-10.Clark, N. (2004) Clinical Concepts in Lower Limb Functional Performance Testing. Keynote Platform Presentation. Ministry ofDefence Medical Rehabilitation Services Annual Conference. Headley Court Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre. Surrey. UK.Clark, N. (2003) Functional Rehabilitation of the Lower Limb. Basic Concepts and Clinical Application. SportEX Medicine. 18,16-21.Hooper, D. Morrissey, M. Drechsler, W. Clark, N. Coutts, F. (2002) Gait Analysis Six and Twelve Months Following AnteriorCruciate Ligament Surgery. Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 403, 168-178.Clark, N. Gumbrell, C. Rana, S. Traole, C. Morrissey, M. (2002) Intratester Reliability and Measurement Error of the AdaptedCrossover Hop for Distance. Physical Therapy in Sport. 3, 143-151.Clark, N. Gumbrell, C. Rana, S. Traole, C. Morrissey, M. (2001) The Relationship Between Vertical Hop Performance andIsotonic Open and Closed Kinetic Chain Muscle Strength of the Lower Limb. Journal of Sports Sciences. 19, 18-19.Clark, N. (2001) Functional Performance Testing Following Knee Ligament Injury. Physical Therapy in Sport. 2, 91-105.Clark, N. (1998) The Long-Term Effects of Different Resistance Training Programmes in Rehabilitation After Anterior CruciateLigament Reconstruction. Nuffield Foundation Research Scholarship. Human Motion and Performance Laboratory. Departmentof Health Sciences. University of East London. London. UK.Clark, N. (1998) Functional Testing Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Proposal for Two Hop Tests atTwelve Month Follow-Up. Nuffield Foundation Research Scholarship. Human Motion and Performance Laboratory. Departmentof Health Sciences. University of East London. London. UK. © Copyright Nicholas Clark, BEd, BSc, PG Dip, MSc, MCSP, MMACP, CSCS. 2008.
  6. 6. Sports-Specific Task and Demand Needs-AnalysisName: Sex (M/F): Date of Birth (DD/MM/YY):Age (yrs): Height (cm): Mass (kg):Primary Sport: Position: Primary Sport Experience (yrs):Global Location: Temperature Range (°C): Humidity Range (%):Current Season: Playing Surface: Diurnal Range (Night/Day): Physical Fitness and Injury EpidemiologyPerformance Duration (hrs):Main Energy System:Energy System Interaction (%):Distances (walk, jog, sprint, m):Movement Directions (forwards, backwards, etc.):Types of Physical Activity (running, jumping, leaping, etc.):Mobility Demands:Muscle Extensibility Demands:Predominant Muscle Groups:Predominant Muscle Actions:Predominant Type of Muscle Strength:Essential Motor Skills (e.g. balance, co-ordination, etc.):Probable Impact/Contact/Collision Sites:Potential Injury Sites:Potential Injury Types:Other Considerations: Copyright Nicholas Clark, BEd, BSc, PG Dip, MSc, MCSP, MMACP, CSCS. 2005-Present www.integratedphysiotherapy.com enquiries@integratedphysiotherapy.com

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