Inspiring the futureMarch 2013
Co-creating…                                             The restaurant ofThe future of flying   Brand Extensions         ...
Through online communities
Agenda1   Why inspiring the future is so difficult2   How do you inspire the future
Why inspiring the future is so difficult
Inspiring the future | slide 6
How can you                                 build                                 temporary                               ...
When there ismore choice thanever… Inspiring the future | slide 8
When                                 consumers are                                 in charge…and                          ...
When it comes tocustomers, feelings are facts Inspiring the future | slide 10
When there is notime to think… Inspiring the future | slide 11
When data usage has exploded…2.9m emails sent every second20 hours of video uploaded to YouTube everyminute50m Tweets ever...
When              90               % of the world’s data willbe created in the next two years                      (Gartne...
When human                                  beings are                                  uncomfortable                     ...
I love Paris in thethe springtimeInspiring the future | slide 15
How do you inspire the future?Inspiring the future | slide 16
…by creatingvalue incustomers’ livesInspiring the future | slide 17
By creating               relationships                                  1Inspiring the future | slide 18
Inspiring the future | slide 19
2                    By asking a big                        questionInspiring the future | slide 20
The bigger the question, the bigger the breakthrough Inspiring the future | slide 21
By listening for                      possibilities                                        3Inspiring the future | slide 22
GREEN/CONSERVATION                 ROMANCE/LUXURY Inspiring the future | slide 23
4                 By inventing togetherInspiring the future | slide 24
Inspiring the future | slide 25
5              By playing/dreamingInspiring the future | slide 26
Thank you!Charles Trevail| CEO               Promise Communispacectrevail@promisecorp.com           75 Wells Streetwww.pro...
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Inspiring the Future by Charles Trevail of Promise Communispace - Presented at Insight Innovation eXchange LATAM 2013

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Businesses are operating in a more volatile world than ever before. Every business model is open to challenge and under constant threat. Increasing levels of data and pressure to move faster make it difficult to take time to step back and think – making businesses and their people resistant to change. On top of that, demanding consumers want more for less and rely on their feelings as facts. These aspects of the current business landscape make it challenging to get inspired and create breakthrough innovations.

To inspire the future, we must turn many of the principles that have guided market research for the last 50 years upside down. Inspiring the future is all about consumer inspired growth by creating real value in customers’ lives. This session will cover six key principles of an ‘outside in’ approach to helping organizations grow and serve as pillars to inspire the future of your business:

Creating deep and intimate relationships
Asking a really big question that matters to your customer
Listening for possibilities
Inventing together to acknowledge that everyone is creating
Generating passion and creativity through play
Building momentum with your consumer

These principles will be brought to life with real life examples from around the world of co-creating with your customers.

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  • Sir Alex Ferguson – Natural risk-takers like Sir Alex Ferguson are few and far between. Even in the face of opposition from fans and players alike, he has never shied away from selling popular, high-profile players like David Beckham or Ruud Van Nistelrooy, if he thought it was for the good of his team.Most people are not like Sir Alex Ferguson or Steve Jobs, and are naturally cautious and risk-averseAt an organisational level, this risk-aversion is often compounded by internal politics and bureaucratic inertia.
  • AppleiPad example
  • Data fact – Research shows that “95% of large organisations collect customer feedback but only 10% use the information to drive improvement” Daniel Kahnemann – The Nobel prize-winner’s book ‘Thinking Fast and Slow’ has been called a masterpiece and described as the best book on psychology in a generation. It’s premise is that we have two types of thinking – ‘system 1’ and ‘system 2’. ‘System 1’ is automatic, intuitive and effort-free, whilst System 2 is conscious and more deliberate. His argument is that System 1often trumps System 2 and draws on an array of psychological principles, studies and examples to justify his position. The importance in feelings in shaping perceptions of a brand – Everything Everywhere continually report higher satisfaction rates among their customers with the network than T-Mobile, even though both operators share the same network
  • The terror of inactivity – In the modern, busy world, we are finding it difficult to be alone with ourselves. Technology and new innovations are increasingly allowing us to fill all gaps in the day with communication, activity, play and work.When we do have time alone, we face the terror of what is happening around us. We are off the grid, out of the loop. This increasingly creates a sense of guilt and anxiety.Question to crowd – When was the last time you switched your phone off? Probably never, due to the ‘fear of missing out’ (what youngsters have abbreviated to ‘FOMO’).
  • Question to audience – what is this facility?In 2006, the businessman Gerard Van Grinsven asked a big question to himself – ‘how do you create a hospital that promotes wellness to all community members, rather than just treating the sick’? The Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital has reinvented the community hospital with an ambitious mission statement of taking ‘health and healing beyond the boundaries of imagination’.
  • Traditional focus groups and surveys tend to ask very specific questions that purposefully restrict the range of possible answers. A company may feel this approach suits them if they want a quick feedback on a specific product or service. However, this represents very superficial engagement and doesn’t enable the creativity and imaginative ideas that all consumers are capable of in the right conditions. Thus, companies need to ask the big question if they really want to harness the creative power of consumers. For example, we have just finished a major, cross-market project with an international airline exploring the future of flying, and what innovations it could launch in 2016 to differentiate itself from the competition. Asking a big question like this has led to the emergence of a range of exciting and practical ideas across all aspects of the flying experience.In 2006, the businessman Gerard Van Grinsven asked a big question to himself – ‘how do you create a hospital that promotes wellness to all community members, rather than just treating the sick’? The Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital has reinvented the community hospital with an ambitious mission statement of taking ‘health and healing beyond the boundaries of imagination’. The hospital’s facilities and surroundings are stunning and more like a luxury hotel than hospital. It is located on 160 acres of woodland and designed to resemble a North Michigan lodge, each patient room is private and designed to resemble a home bedroom, and the food is gourmet and organic. The hospital also hosts free concerts for the community and has even received requests from couples wishing to hold their wedding reception there!
  • In 1991, British Airway’s transatlantic business passengers provided up to 40% of the airline’s profits, yet these cabins were only half full. We set ourselves the challenge of designing a customer-focused change process that would boost business ticket sales. Our process involved the BA team at every stage including an initial internal session that challenged existing assumptions, a workshop with customers – in which 25 BA staff met and worked with 50 premium travellers – and a final implementation programme that sought to overcome internal barriersResult?Customers and staff invented together the world’s first fully flat beds in business class. This was launched in 2000 and increased revenue per seat by 60% and doubled customer satisfaction in the first year
  • Example – Sky’s customer closeness sessions, where different types of TV viewers met each other along with Sky executives, led to a breakthrough insight. Listening to Sky+ customers enthusiastically extoll its virtues to Freeview users, Sky executives came to realise the solution to converting Freeview users to Sky+ was ‘to tell, not sell’. This insight formed the basis of an advertising campaign in which famous faces, like Michael Parkinson, talked about the strengths of Sky+. The campaign helped Sky to produce its strongest Q4 net additions in five years – attracting 321,000 new customers.
  • Our full-day work shop with safari business &Beyond (then CC Africa) revealed what the core essence of the brand should be in the eyes of its customers.Before the workshop, many of the internal team felt the business’ differentiator was its green and conservation credentials. However, through listening to customers and non-customers, the team learned that in spite of growing consumer consciousness around ‘green’ issues, it was not yet a buying criterion and what most people were buying into was luxury
  • In 2005, we worked with Jumeirah to ‘invent the future of hospitality’ and re-engage the brand with its customers as they embarked on an ambitious global expansion programme. Before the workshops with customers in the US, UK and Dubai, Jumeriah’s management believed its focus should be providing its customers with more luxury. However, consumers told a very different story. Their gripes were much more elementary – they wanted free wifi in the hotel and lower laundry prices!Involving senior management in the process ensured these basic but crucial insights landed and were acted upon by management.
  • Etihad –Designers and consumers worked together to help build the aircraft of the future.
  • Inspiring the Future by Charles Trevail of Promise Communispace - Presented at Insight Innovation eXchange LATAM 2013

    1. 1. Inspiring the futureMarch 2013
    2. 2. Co-creating… The restaurant ofThe future of flying Brand Extensions the future Retail service Better money in a A global mission – ‘make propositions cashless world everyday delicious’
    3. 3. Through online communities
    4. 4. Agenda1 Why inspiring the future is so difficult2 How do you inspire the future
    5. 5. Why inspiring the future is so difficult
    6. 6. Inspiring the future | slide 6
    7. 7. How can you build temporary monopolies?Inspiring the future | slide 7
    8. 8. When there ismore choice thanever… Inspiring the future | slide 8
    9. 9. When consumers are in charge…and are becoming more and more demanding…Inspiring the future | slide 9
    10. 10. When it comes tocustomers, feelings are facts Inspiring the future | slide 10
    11. 11. When there is notime to think… Inspiring the future | slide 11
    12. 12. When data usage has exploded…2.9m emails sent every second20 hours of video uploaded to YouTube everyminute50m Tweets every day (www.bigdatadiary.com) Inspiring the future | slide 12
    13. 13. When 90 % of the world’s data willbe created in the next two years (Gartner) Inspiring the future | slide 13
    14. 14. When human beings are uncomfortable with change …Inspiring the future | slide 14
    15. 15. I love Paris in thethe springtimeInspiring the future | slide 15
    16. 16. How do you inspire the future?Inspiring the future | slide 16
    17. 17. …by creatingvalue incustomers’ livesInspiring the future | slide 17
    18. 18. By creating relationships 1Inspiring the future | slide 18
    19. 19. Inspiring the future | slide 19
    20. 20. 2 By asking a big questionInspiring the future | slide 20
    21. 21. The bigger the question, the bigger the breakthrough Inspiring the future | slide 21
    22. 22. By listening for possibilities 3Inspiring the future | slide 22
    23. 23. GREEN/CONSERVATION ROMANCE/LUXURY Inspiring the future | slide 23
    24. 24. 4 By inventing togetherInspiring the future | slide 24
    25. 25. Inspiring the future | slide 25
    26. 26. 5 By playing/dreamingInspiring the future | slide 26
    27. 27. Thank you!Charles Trevail| CEO Promise Communispacectrevail@promisecorp.com 75 Wells Streetwww.promisecorp.com London W1T 3QH telephone: +44 (0) 207 290 0290Promise’s first book is out now!Inspiring the future | slide 27

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