Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

AIA2018 - Alar Kolk - Prototyping & Experiments

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 51 Ad

More Related Content

Slideshows for you (20)

Similar to AIA2018 - Alar Kolk - Prototyping & Experiments (20)

Advertisement

More from European Innovation Academy (20)

Recently uploaded (20)

Advertisement

AIA2018 - Alar Kolk - Prototyping & Experiments

  1. 1. PROTOTYPING & EXPERIMENTS Alar Kolk
  2. 2. FROM PROBLEM TO PROTOTYPE VALIDATION USER CENTRIC DESIGN
  3. 3. CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS RIGHT ABOUT WHAT HE NEEDS. CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS WRONG ABOUT HOW HE NEEDS IT.
  4. 4. Innovation Approach DESIGN THINKING
  5. 5. ETHNOGRAPHY ORALB ASSUMPTION: KIDS ARE JUST SMALLER HUMANS CUSTOMER OBSERVATION RESULT: MARKET LEADERSHIP FOR 18 MONTHS
  6. 6. GOOD PROTOTYPES ARE QUESTIONS, NOT ANSWERS - Tim Brown, IDEO
  7. 7. USER RESEARCH WITH PROTOTYPES: ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS Showing users a prototype is partially usability testing & partially user research. You get feedback on actual designs & you learn about users.
  8. 8. 3D low-fidelity prototype for HealthyMade: fresh ingredients and recipes packaged into a healthy preplanned meal. This product answers the question, “How might we provide healthier food options to people in
  9. 9. USER RESEARCH WITH PROTOTYPES: ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS Showing users a prototype is partially usability testing & partially user research. You get feedback on actual designs & you learn about users.
  10. 10. MINIMUM SET OF FEATURES TO SOLVE THE PROBLEM
  11. 11. MINIMUM VIABLE PRODUCT
  12. 12. CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS RIGHT ABOUT WHAT HE NEEDS. CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS WRONG ABOUT HOW HE NEEDS IT.
  13. 13. THE ONLY WAY TO FIGURE IT OUT IS TO EXPERIMENT
  14. 14. Innovation Approach MINIMUM VIABLE PRODUCT
  15. 15. MINIMUM VIABLE PRODUCT WEAK PRODUCT PRODUCT YOU WANT TO BUILD MVP
  16. 16. EXPERIMENTAL MINDSET
  17. 17. MAKE IT REAL! IDEAS ARE NOT REAL - Jake Knapp, Google Venture
  18. 18. PROTOTYPE MINDSET YOU CAN PROTOTYPE ANYTHING PROTOTYPES ARE DISPOSABLE BUILD JUST ENOUGH TO LEARN, BUT NOT MORE THE PROTOTYPE MUST APPEAR REAL Stay optimistic and adopt the prototype mindset. Don’t prototype anything you aren’t willing to throw away. The prototype is meant to answer questions, so keep it focused. Show customers something realistic, their reactions will be genuine.
  19. 19. INNOVATION PROCESS FAKE-IT PROTOTYPE TIME FAKE IT LEAR N MONEY After customer problem/pain discovery Instead of taking weeks, months, or even years to build the solution, you can fake it. If customers are ready to buy your product or solution Ask upfront payment, partial or full
  20. 20. INNOVATION PROCESS FAKE-IT PROTOTYPE
  21. 21. FAKE THE REAL THING VIDEO MARVELAPP.COM & SIMILAR LANDING PAGE IMAGES
  22. 22. Experiments ALEXA: WIZARD OF OZ TESTING Feature testing DISCOVERY OF CUSTOMER PREFERENCES TESTING DEVICE READINESS TIME CONSUMING STRONG INPUT FOR DEVELOPERS
  23. 23. HOW TO PROTOTYPE? TEST & VALIDATE START WITH INEXPENSIVE METHODS CONTINUE WITH MORE EXPENSIVE OTHERWISE YOU WASTE MONEY Including customer interviews and user groups Paper, digital visualization, MS PowerPoint, Keynote Only if validated by customers And you never learn what customers want
  24. 24. Sketches Low Fidelity Wireframes Mockups Animations Beta Test High Fidelity Alpha Test Interactive Functional SCALE PROTOTYPE: LOW & HIGH FIDELITY
  25. 25. SCALE PROTOTYPE: LOW & HIGH FIDELITY
  26. 26. LOW FIDELITY PROTOTYPING
  27. 27. PAPER PROTOTYPING
  28. 28. IF A PICTURE IS WORTH 1 000 WORDS, THEN A PROTOTYPE IS WORTH 1 000 MEETINGS. A saying at IDEO
  29. 29. 1. A4 SHEET OF PAPER WITH 8 BOXES 2. TIMER FOR 8 MINUTES 3. 8 QUICK IDEAS / CUSTOMER WALK THROUGH SCREENS 4. SHARE THE STORIES 5. AGREE ON WHAT STORY TO STICK TO THE CRAZY 8
  30. 30. THE CRAZY 8
  31. 31. THE CRAZY 8
  32. 32. 1. A4 SHEET OF PAPER WITH 8 BOXES 2. TIMER FOR 8 MINUTES 3. 8 QUICK IDEAS EACH IN 8 MINUTES 4. SHARE THE STORIES 5. AGREE ON WHAT STORY TO STICK TO THE CRAZY 8
  33. 33. PAPER PROTOTYPING
  34. 34. PAPER PROTOTYPING HOW TO?
  35. 35. LOW FIDELITY: PAPER PROTOTYPE
  36. 36. LOW FIDELITY: PAPER PROTOTYPE
  37. 37. USER RESEARCH WITH PROTOTYPES: ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS Showing users a prototype is partially usability testing & partially user research. You get feedback on actual designs & you learn about users.
  38. 38. LOW FIDELITY: PAPER PROTOTYPE
  39. 39. Nintendo use low-fidelity prototyping: the only way to actually know what a Miiverse would feel like was to hold it. That’s when he built this prototype out of cardboard. LOW FIDELITY: PAPER PROTOTYPE
  40. 40. HIGH FIDELITY PROTOTYPING
  41. 41. A high-fidelity (high-fi or hi-fi) prototype is a computer-based interactive representation of the product in its closest resemblance to the final design in terms of details and functionality..
  42. 42. HIGH FIDELITY
  43. 43. HiFi PROTOTYPE SELL VISUAL DESIGN FEEDBANK EASY You can start selling now Hi-fi prototypes are more visually appealing They allow clients to test your design and to give you feedback High fidelity is easier than ever in today’s world of top software.
  44. 44. HiFi PROTOTYPE TOOLS
  45. 45. https://www.cooper.com/prototyping-tools? PROTOTYPING TOOLS
  46. 46. THANK YOU

Editor's Notes

  • https://dschool.stanford.edu/groups/k12/wiki/41a18/POV_.html
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvkivmyKgEA
  • What questions:
    Customer likes
    Customer profitable acquisition
    Unit economics
    Business model scalability

    All together – Product-market FIT
  • What questions:
    Customer likes
    Customer profitable acquisition
    Unit economics
    Business model scalability

    All together – Product-market FIT
  • What questions:
    Customer likes
    Customer profitable acquisition
    Unit economics
    Business model scalability

    All together – Product-market FIT
  • What questions:
    Customer likes
    Customer profitable acquisition
    Unit economics
    Business model scalability

    All together – Product-market FIT
  • EIA Smart watch example
  • Test involved a human “wizard” sitting in aseparate room and responding in real-time to anyvoice query a human testing subject would maketo the Echo.
    Objective was to collect informationon the nature of responses- What types ofresponses worked and what didn't work?
    The objective was to figure out what does it take to really make people excited?
  • 1. Primary task: The first thing to do before you even think about putting pen to paper is to ask yourself this question: what is your app’s primary task? Specifically write down:
    (Your differentiator) (Your solution) for (Your audience).
    Let’s look at an example for the app Evernote:
    “Evernote for iPhone lets you create notes, snap photos, and record voice memos that you can then access any time from your iPhone, computer, or the web.”
    The copy on their website clearly explains the primary task for the app:
    (Omni-accessible) (multiple file type creation and storage) for (casual iPhone users).

    2. 2. Create Use Case Scenarios
    Once you’ve defined your primary task, you’ve probably also put some thought into who wants an app that performs this task! Use cases are the BEST way to get the paper prototyping process started. In this article, I talk about how I defined use case scenarios for our Doodle Bright app. I gave “my people” a name, an address, an occupation and a specific scenario when they might use an app like Doodle Bright.
    Here’s an example:
    Jane is waiting in the doctors office for a 3 o’clock appointment with her 4-year old son, Chad. She brought her iPad just in case the wait is longer than expected and of course they’re stuck in the waiting room for a half hour before they are called. Jane passes the time by drawing trucks and trains with Chad while they wait for her appointment.
    In this scenario, Jane and Chad are playing with the app together, which means mom can prompt him on how to interact with different elements on the screen if he is unsure of the next step.
    Now let’s look at this example:
    Jane is in the carpool line to pick up her eldest from school. Chad is in the backseat, bored after a day of running errands. Jane hands her iPad to him with the Doodle Bright app launched. Chad knows which buttons to push because they are intuitive to a 4-year old.
    In this scenario, the controls have to be easily understandable for an unsupervised child. Does this alter the types of paper prototypes you create for this app? Heck yea it does! Now, instead of designing for mom and son, to have a wider appeal we see that the prototypes should primary be geared towards only the child.
    It may be obvious that an app like this would require “thinking like a child” but without this use case scenario to back up that claim, you may fall into the default “adult mode” of thinking about the design.
     
    3.
     
  • What questions:
    Customer likes
    Customer profitable acquisition
    Unit economics
    Business model scalability

    All together – Product-market FIT

×