Experience from ImplementingMutual Peer Reviews amongCzech Development Civil SocietyOrganisationsInka Píbilováinka@evaluac...
2FoRS•Czech Forum forDevelopment Cooperation•50 development CSOsinvolved in 60 countries•Combined turnover is similarto th...
Code on Effectiveness *2011http://www.cso-effectiveness.org/istanbul-principles,067?lang=enhttp://www.fors.cz/user_files/f...
Code on Effectiveness – Example:
Code on Effectiveness Annual SelfevaluationCzech CSO´s self-assessment 2011 - 2013StrengthsValidate data in the field Pu...
Code on Effectiveness Annual SelfevaluationHow to make self-assessment more objective?
BooksPeer ReviewsCode on Effectiveness Annual SelfevaluationHow to develop CSOs´ capacities?ConferencesWorking GroupsDevel...
8Peer Review – Strategic approachToRFoRS Code ofEffectivenessSelf-assessmentInterestedPeersBriefingWG1WG2WG3Finalworkshop&...
9Peer Review – Strategic approachStrategic Peer Review„Peer Review reminded us what we forgot, it opened questions we did ...
10Peer Review – Quick versionDWWFoRS Code ofEffectivenessSelf-assessmentBilateralpeerreviewBilateral Mutual Peer Review• S...
11Peer Review – Quick versionBenefits of Mutual Peer Review• Perspective of otherpracticionaires• Mutual learning• Low cos...
12Peer Review – Quick versionMyths about Mutual Peer Reviews• External evaluation or audit• One-way feedback• A peer from ...
13Peer Review – Quick versionKey Steps for CSOs to Implement Peer Reviews1. Agree within the organisation whyto do a Peer ...
14Peer Review – Quick versionHow platforms can help1. Identify appropriate framework toguide Peer Reviews2. Tailor Peer Re...
Thank you for your attention!Inka Píbilováinka@evaluace.comwww.fors.cz
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Mutual Peer Reviews between Organisations

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Mutual Peer Reviews between Organisations based on CSO Development Effectiveness principles have been piloted in 2012 by the Czech Forum for Development Cooperation - FoRS. This presentation for the association IDEAS shows key principles, steps for implementation and lessons learnt. The peer reviews can be used to bring Codes and frameworks alive and to develop capacities of orgaisations.

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  • How to make assessment more objective ? How to build capacities of CSOs beside workshops ? How to enhance sharing expertise of the platform members ? How to involve small, volunteer -based organisations, with highly limited resources? How to promote the guidelines beyond the platform? … And how to do it with minimum costs ? Workshops have been organized by FoRS as per the needs identified. However, only a limited number of CSO representatives could participate due to limited capacities and time constraints. Moreover, it has been realized that workshops and guidelines (such as the Code) are not sufficient to progress on the quality issues. It was identified that innovative solutions were needed to ignite a wider debate on development effectiveness and to foster capacity building among diverse actors, including   less formal, often volunteer-based CSOs, individual experts, students as well as companies and state actors. Therefore two new concepts have been launched: (A) DevelopmentCoffee.org and (B) Peer Reviews.
  • Besides annual self-evaluations as the main voluntary principle agreed in the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, the Peer Reviews are strongly recommended in order to increase objectivity of the assessment, to provide valuable external feedback to reviewed organisations and to support mutual learning and capacity building. The Peer Reviews have been inspired by the Global Education Network Europe (GENE) approach and especially by the experience of RORG-network , which introduced Peer Reviews in 2008 as one of the quality-building measures of the development education sector in Norway. The main purpose of RORG-network was to develop a certain degree of common understanding of development education. The lessons learnt, especially the engagement of several experts and focus on the uniqueness and added value of each organisation, in line with the appreciative inquiry approach , have served as a basis for developing a Czech system of development CSO Peer Reviews (FoRS, September 2011). FoRS Peer Reviews allow a structured, in-depth debate on each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness and mutual learning among self-selected peer CSOs. The process is facilitated through FoRS on-line Code of Effectiveness questionnaire, where FoRS members indicate their interest in the Peer Review. The member CSOs can also directly approach concrete peers based on the area they would like to get feedback on, ranging from awareness raising activities, to development interventions in the field, to general management. The sector overview of FoRS Secretariat is often helpful to identify such peers from among the member organisations. Drawing from the Norwegian experience, pilot Peer Reviews were launched by FoRS in cooperation with its member organisation SIRIRI in 2012, whereby five organisations were involved in this pilot phase. During the process, evidence is shared to jointly assess each indicator and draw recommendations for any changes if applicable. Moreover, SIRIRI has used the exercise not only to review each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, but also to get feedback on its overall strategy and ways forward. Other members tested mutual Peer Reviews bilaterally.
  • Besides annual self-evaluations as the main voluntary principle agreed in the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, the Peer Reviews are strongly recommended in order to increase objectivity of the assessment, to provide valuable external feedback to reviewed organisations and to support mutual learning and capacity building. The Peer Reviews have been inspired by the Global Education Network Europe (GENE) approach and especially by the experience of RORG-network , which introduced Peer Reviews in 2008 as one of the quality-building measures of the development education sector in Norway. The main purpose of RORG-network was to develop a certain degree of common understanding of development education. The lessons learnt, especially the engagement of several experts and focus on the uniqueness and added value of each organisation, in line with the appreciative inquiry approach , have served as a basis for developing a Czech system of development CSO Peer Reviews (FoRS, September 2011). FoRS Peer Reviews allow a structured, in-depth debate on each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness and mutual learning among self-selected peer CSOs. The process is facilitated through FoRS on-line Code of Effectiveness questionnaire, where FoRS members indicate their interest in the Peer Review. The member CSOs can also directly approach concrete peers based on the area they would like to get feedback on, ranging from awareness raising activities, to development interventions in the field, to general management. The sector overview of FoRS Secretariat is often helpful to identify such peers from among the member organisations. Drawing from the Norwegian experience, pilot Peer Reviews were launched by FoRS in cooperation with its member organisation SIRIRI in 2012, whereby five organisations were involved in this pilot phase. During the process, evidence is shared to jointly assess each indicator and draw recommendations for any changes if applicable. Moreover, SIRIRI has used the exercise not only to review each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, but also to get feedback on its overall strategy and ways forward. Other members tested mutual Peer Reviews bilaterally.
  • Besides annual self-evaluations as the main voluntary principle agreed in the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, the Peer Reviews are strongly recommended in order to increase objectivity of the assessment, to provide valuable external feedback to reviewed organisations and to support mutual learning and capacity building. The Peer Reviews have been inspired by the Global Education Network Europe (GENE) approach and especially by the experience of RORG-network , which introduced Peer Reviews in 2008 as one of the quality-building measures of the development education sector in Norway. The main purpose of RORG-network was to develop a certain degree of common understanding of development education. The lessons learnt, especially the engagement of several experts and focus on the uniqueness and added value of each organisation, in line with the appreciative inquiry approach , have served as a basis for developing a Czech system of development CSO Peer Reviews (FoRS, September 2011). FoRS Peer Reviews allow a structured, in-depth debate on each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness and mutual learning among self-selected peer CSOs. The process is facilitated through FoRS on-line Code of Effectiveness questionnaire, where FoRS members indicate their interest in the Peer Review. The member CSOs can also directly approach concrete peers based on the area they would like to get feedback on, ranging from awareness raising activities, to development interventions in the field, to general management. The sector overview of FoRS Secretariat is often helpful to identify such peers from among the member organisations. Drawing from the Norwegian experience, pilot Peer Reviews were launched by FoRS in cooperation with its member organisation SIRIRI in 2012, whereby five organisations were involved in this pilot phase. During the process, evidence is shared to jointly assess each indicator and draw recommendations for any changes if applicable. Moreover, SIRIRI has used the exercise not only to review each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, but also to get feedback on its overall strategy and ways forward. Other members tested mutual Peer Reviews bilaterally.
  • Besides annual self-evaluations as the main voluntary principle agreed in the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, the Peer Reviews are strongly recommended in order to increase objectivity of the assessment, to provide valuable external feedback to reviewed organisations and to support mutual learning and capacity building. The Peer Reviews have been inspired by the Global Education Network Europe (GENE) approach and especially by the experience of RORG-network , which introduced Peer Reviews in 2008 as one of the quality-building measures of the development education sector in Norway. The main purpose of RORG-network was to develop a certain degree of common understanding of development education. The lessons learnt, especially the engagement of several experts and focus on the uniqueness and added value of each organisation, in line with the appreciative inquiry approach , have served as a basis for developing a Czech system of development CSO Peer Reviews (FoRS, September 2011). FoRS Peer Reviews allow a structured, in-depth debate on each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness and mutual learning among self-selected peer CSOs. The process is facilitated through FoRS on-line Code of Effectiveness questionnaire, where FoRS members indicate their interest in the Peer Review. The member CSOs can also directly approach concrete peers based on the area they would like to get feedback on, ranging from awareness raising activities, to development interventions in the field, to general management. The sector overview of FoRS Secretariat is often helpful to identify such peers from among the member organisations. Drawing from the Norwegian experience, pilot Peer Reviews were launched by FoRS in cooperation with its member organisation SIRIRI in 2012, whereby five organisations were involved in this pilot phase. During the process, evidence is shared to jointly assess each indicator and draw recommendations for any changes if applicable. Moreover, SIRIRI has used the exercise not only to review each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, but also to get feedback on its overall strategy and ways forward. Other members tested mutual Peer Reviews bilaterally.
  • Besides annual self-evaluations as the main voluntary principle agreed in the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, the Peer Reviews are strongly recommended in order to increase objectivity of the assessment, to provide valuable external feedback to reviewed organisations and to support mutual learning and capacity building. The Peer Reviews have been inspired by the Global Education Network Europe (GENE) approach and especially by the experience of RORG-network , which introduced Peer Reviews in 2008 as one of the quality-building measures of the development education sector in Norway. The main purpose of RORG-network was to develop a certain degree of common understanding of development education. The lessons learnt, especially the engagement of several experts and focus on the uniqueness and added value of each organisation, in line with the appreciative inquiry approach , have served as a basis for developing a Czech system of development CSO Peer Reviews (FoRS, September 2011). FoRS Peer Reviews allow a structured, in-depth debate on each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness and mutual learning among self-selected peer CSOs. The process is facilitated through FoRS on-line Code of Effectiveness questionnaire, where FoRS members indicate their interest in the Peer Review. The member CSOs can also directly approach concrete peers based on the area they would like to get feedback on, ranging from awareness raising activities, to development interventions in the field, to general management. The sector overview of FoRS Secretariat is often helpful to identify such peers from among the member organisations. Drawing from the Norwegian experience, pilot Peer Reviews were launched by FoRS in cooperation with its member organisation SIRIRI in 2012, whereby five organisations were involved in this pilot phase. During the process, evidence is shared to jointly assess each indicator and draw recommendations for any changes if applicable. Moreover, SIRIRI has used the exercise not only to review each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, but also to get feedback on its overall strategy and ways forward. Other members tested mutual Peer Reviews bilaterally.
  • Besides annual self-evaluations as the main voluntary principle agreed in the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, the Peer Reviews are strongly recommended in order to increase objectivity of the assessment, to provide valuable external feedback to reviewed organisations and to support mutual learning and capacity building. The Peer Reviews have been inspired by the Global Education Network Europe (GENE) approach and especially by the experience of RORG-network , which introduced Peer Reviews in 2008 as one of the quality-building measures of the development education sector in Norway. The main purpose of RORG-network was to develop a certain degree of common understanding of development education. The lessons learnt, especially the engagement of several experts and focus on the uniqueness and added value of each organisation, in line with the appreciative inquiry approach , have served as a basis for developing a Czech system of development CSO Peer Reviews (FoRS, September 2011). FoRS Peer Reviews allow a structured, in-depth debate on each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness and mutual learning among self-selected peer CSOs. The process is facilitated through FoRS on-line Code of Effectiveness questionnaire, where FoRS members indicate their interest in the Peer Review. The member CSOs can also directly approach concrete peers based on the area they would like to get feedback on, ranging from awareness raising activities, to development interventions in the field, to general management. The sector overview of FoRS Secretariat is often helpful to identify such peers from among the member organisations. Drawing from the Norwegian experience, pilot Peer Reviews were launched by FoRS in cooperation with its member organisation SIRIRI in 2012, whereby five organisations were involved in this pilot phase. During the process, evidence is shared to jointly assess each indicator and draw recommendations for any changes if applicable. Moreover, SIRIRI has used the exercise not only to review each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, but also to get feedback on its overall strategy and ways forward. Other members tested mutual Peer Reviews bilaterally.
  • Besides annual self-evaluations as the main voluntary principle agreed in the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, the Peer Reviews are strongly recommended in order to increase objectivity of the assessment, to provide valuable external feedback to reviewed organisations and to support mutual learning and capacity building. The Peer Reviews have been inspired by the Global Education Network Europe (GENE) approach and especially by the experience of RORG-network , which introduced Peer Reviews in 2008 as one of the quality-building measures of the development education sector in Norway. The main purpose of RORG-network was to develop a certain degree of common understanding of development education. The lessons learnt, especially the engagement of several experts and focus on the uniqueness and added value of each organisation, in line with the appreciative inquiry approach , have served as a basis for developing a Czech system of development CSO Peer Reviews (FoRS, September 2011). FoRS Peer Reviews allow a structured, in-depth debate on each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness and mutual learning among self-selected peer CSOs. The process is facilitated through FoRS on-line Code of Effectiveness questionnaire, where FoRS members indicate their interest in the Peer Review. The member CSOs can also directly approach concrete peers based on the area they would like to get feedback on, ranging from awareness raising activities, to development interventions in the field, to general management. The sector overview of FoRS Secretariat is often helpful to identify such peers from among the member organisations. Drawing from the Norwegian experience, pilot Peer Reviews were launched by FoRS in cooperation with its member organisation SIRIRI in 2012, whereby five organisations were involved in this pilot phase. During the process, evidence is shared to jointly assess each indicator and draw recommendations for any changes if applicable. Moreover, SIRIRI has used the exercise not only to review each principle of the FoRS Code on Effectiveness, but also to get feedback on its overall strategy and ways forward. Other members tested mutual Peer Reviews bilaterally.
  • Mutual Peer Reviews between Organisations

    1. 1. Experience from ImplementingMutual Peer Reviews amongCzech Development Civil SocietyOrganisationsInka Píbilováinka@evaluace.comIDEAS GA 2013
    2. 2. 2FoRS•Czech Forum forDevelopment Cooperation•50 development CSOsinvolved in 60 countries•Combined turnover is similarto the Czech official bilateraldevelopment cooperation
    3. 3. Code on Effectiveness *2011http://www.cso-effectiveness.org/istanbul-principles,067?lang=enhttp://www.fors.cz/user_files/fors_code_on_effectiveness_en.pdf1. Grassroots knowledge2. Transparency and accountability3. Partnership4. Respect to human rights and gender equality5. Accountability for impacts and their sustainabilityHow to support CSOs to be more effective?
    4. 4. Code on Effectiveness – Example:
    5. 5. Code on Effectiveness Annual SelfevaluationCzech CSO´s self-assessment 2011 - 2013StrengthsValidate data in the field Publish most informationincluding contacts Refuse corruption infundraising Mutual capacity building Avoiding stereotypes Not using pictures of extremesuffering for fundraisingAreas for ImprovementPublish strategic priorities onlineContribute to FoRS workinggroupsPublish funding / financial infoSharing project docs, otherprojectsImpact indicators missingLack of participatory evaluations
    6. 6. Code on Effectiveness Annual SelfevaluationHow to make self-assessment more objective?
    7. 7. BooksPeer ReviewsCode on Effectiveness Annual SelfevaluationHow to develop CSOs´ capacities?ConferencesWorking GroupsDevelopmentCoffee.orgWorkshops70%20%10%
    8. 8. 8Peer Review – Strategic approachToRFoRS Code ofEffectivenessSelf-assessmentInterestedPeersBriefingWG1WG2WG3Finalworkshop& reportStrategic Peer Review
    9. 9. 9Peer Review – Strategic approachStrategic Peer Review„Peer Review reminded us what we forgot, it opened questions we did notask ourselves and mapped different experiences that we may utilise. Thechallenge was the low ownership through the organisation and commitmentof the new management to implement suggested changes.“
    10. 10. 10Peer Review – Quick versionDWWFoRS Code ofEffectivenessSelf-assessmentBilateralpeerreviewBilateral Mutual Peer Review• Self-selected peer CSOs• Trust to share mutually• Following indicators of theCode on Effectiveness• Constructive and appreciative• Focus on improvements• Respect for diversity• VoluntaryInterested Peers
    11. 11. 11Peer Review – Quick versionBenefits of Mutual Peer Review• Perspective of otherpracticionaires• Mutual learning• Low costs• Time flexibility• Brings Codes / frameworksalive
    12. 12. 12Peer Review – Quick versionMyths about Mutual Peer Reviews• External evaluation or audit• One-way feedback• A peer from the samebackground• Experts for low costs• Losing know-how• Peer Reviews will bring a positivechange
    13. 13. 13Peer Review – Quick versionKey Steps for CSOs to Implement Peer Reviews1. Agree within the organisation whyto do a Peer Review2. Secure sufficient capacities andownership3. Choose a partner you trust4. Be open to a different perspectiveand a change5. Priritize and follow-up
    14. 14. 14Peer Review – Quick versionHow platforms can help1. Identify appropriate framework toguide Peer Reviews2. Tailor Peer Reviews to localcontext3. Pilot Peer Reviews4. Connect potential peers and setthe basic rules and expectations5. Support them on their way6. Evaluate the process andincorporate improvements
    15. 15. Thank you for your attention!Inka Píbilováinka@evaluace.comwww.fors.cz

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