Inspiratiereis 2010 - IBM - Smarter planet small

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  • Building a smarter planet is IBM's point of view on how interconnected technologies are changing the way the world literally works . That is, the systems and processes that enable: physical goods to be developed, manufactured, bought and sold; services to be delivered; everything from people and money to oil, water and electrons to move; and billions of people to work, govern themselves and live . In this presentation I will introduce you to this point of view and provide some examples of how IBM is working with our clients to build a smarter planet.
  • First, let me provide some context. We are at an extraordinary moment in history: a major political transition in the United States, the global economy in flux, our financial markets restructuring themselves – and an acutely felt need for leadership. Our political leaders aren’t the only ones who’ve been handed a mandate for change. Leaders of businesses and institutions everywhere confront a unique opportunity to transform the way the world works. In the last few years, our eyes have been opened to global climate change, and to the environmental and geopolitical issues surrounding energy. We have been made aware of global supply chains for food and medicine. And, of course, we entered the new century with the shock to our sense of security delivered by the attacks on 9/11. These collective realizations have reminded us that we are all now connected – economically, technically and socially. Free trade agreements, the Internet and the arrival of globalization are making the world simultaneously smaller and flatter. But we’re also learning that just being connected is not sufficient. Yes, the world continues to get “flatter.” And yes, it continues to get smaller and more interconnected. But something is happening that holds even greater potential. In a word, our planet is becoming smarter . This isn’t just a metaphor. I mean infusing intelligence into the way the world literally works – the systems and processes that enable physical goods to be developed, manufactured, bought and sold… services to be delivered… everything from people and money to oil, water and electrons to move… and billions of people to work and live. What’s making this possible? There are three factors…
  • First, our world is becoming instrumented. The transistor, invented 60 years ago, is the basic building block of the digital age. Now, consider a world in which there are a billion transistors per human, each one costing one ten-millionth of a cent. We’ll have that by 2010. There will likely be 4 billion mobile phone subscribers by the end of this year…and 30 billion Radio Frequency Identification tags produced globally within two years. Sensors are being embedded across entire ecosystems – supply-chains, healthcare networks, cities… even natural systems like rivers. Source: IBM’s Global Technology Outlook
  • Source: In-Stat, an Arizona-based market research firm.
  • Source: International Telecommunication Union.
  • *One billion camera phones in 2007, according to Gartner. **3G devices growing 30% annually according to RNCOS.
  • Second, our world is becoming interconnected. Very soon there will be 2 billion people on the Internet. But in an instrumented world, systems and objects can now “speak” to one another, too. Think about the prospect of a trillion connected and intelligent things – cars, appliances, cameras, roadways, pipelines… even pharmaceuticals and livestock. The amount of information produced by the interaction of all those things will be unprecedented. Third, all things are becoming intelligent. New computing models can handle the proliferation of end-user devices, sensors and actuators and connect them with backend systems. Combined with advanced analytics, those supercomputers can turn mountains of data into intelligence that can be translated into action, making our systems, processes and infrastructures more efficient, more productive and responsive – in a word, smarter. *2 billion people on the Web by 2011, according to the Computer Industry Almanac. **A trillion connected objects, according to "From Autonomous to Cooperative," ERCIM Workshop on eMobility.
  • What this means is that the digital and physical infrastructures of the world are converging . Computational power is being put into things we wouldn’t recognize as computers. Indeed, almost anything – any person, any object, any process or any service, for any organization, large or small – can become digitally aware and networked. With so much technology and networking abundantly available at such low cost, what wouldn't you enhance? What service wouldn’t you provide a customer, citizen, student or patient? What wouldn't you connect? What information wouldn't you mine for insight? The answer is you -- or your competitor – will do all of that. You will do it because you can – the technology is available and affordable. But there is another reason we will make our companies, institutions and industries smarter. Because we must . Not just at moments of widespread shock, but integrated into our day-to-day operations. These mundane processes of business, government and life – which are ultimately the source of those “surprising” crises – are not smart enough to be sustainable. [NOTE: Insert customized examples from your geography and/or industry on slides 9-15.]
  • It’s obvious that we’re going to have to work a lot smarter and more efficiently. Fortunately, we now can. A new technical reality makes enormous gains possible . The emerging computing model is far smarter . It is networked, grounded in open standards and connected to a proliferation of client devices whose heterogeneous systems and applications are no longer a roadblock. It is built on massively powerful backend systems – not only with unprecedented computing speed, but with advanced analytics, modeling and virtualization. And it is based on a new application model – where software is componentized, dynamically reconfigurable and deliverable over the Net as a service, rather than being hardwired to servers. And we can integrate data from multiple sources and parse it in new ways – not only to unearth new patterns, but to act upon them in industry-specific processes. Up to now, we've thought of physical infrastructure and IT infrastructure as separate: airports, roadways, buildings, power plants, oil wells, on the one hand; and datacenters, PCs, cell phones, routers, broadband, etc., on the other. The first was the stuff of concrete, wires and steel; the second of bits, chips and bandwidth. Now, the infrastructure of atoms and the infrastructure of bits are merging, into an intelligent global infrastructure . We see this in how companies and institutions are rethinking their systems and applying technology in new ways. IBM is building this new reality with our clients today . Let me give you a few examples… [NOTE: Insert customized examples from your geography and/or industry on slides 17-24.]
  • Smart healthcare can lower the cost of therapy by as much as 90 percent – as ActiveCare Network is doing for more than 2 million patients in 38 states, whom it monitors for the proper delivery of their injections and vaccines. IBM is helping ActiveCare Network monitor over 12,000 clinics and provide over two million patients with the proper delivery network for injections, vaccines and other pharmaceuticals. ACN is using IBM software to lower the cost of therapy by 90 percent and reduce time and cost required to develop patient and clinic applications by 60 percent.
  • Smart energy . IBM leads 7 of the 11 smart meter deployments globally, building intelligence into utilities to lower costs for customers and better balance the grid. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has helped homeowners reduce energy costs up to 10 percent by turning ordinary thermostats into day traders for energy, ensuring the best cost for the customer and better load balancing for the grid.
  • Smart tracking and food systems . IBM and Matiq are developing a smarter food tracking solution, the first-of-its-kind in the Nordics …it uses RFID technology to track and trace meat and poultry from the farm, through the supply chain, to supermarket shelves.
  • Smart financial systems . IBM rebuilt the world’s currency markets -- one of the most advanced and complex exchanges -- to help understand risk in real-time.
  • Smart traffic . Smart traffic systems are strengthening the competitive positions of cities. IBM is working with Brisbane, London, Singapore and Stockholm to deploy smarter traffic systems. At least 20 other cities have active bids to do the same. Stockholm has seen approximately 20 percent less traffic, a 12 percent drop in emissions and a reported 40,000 additional daily users of public transportation. In fact, the people of Stockholm voted to put it in permanently, following the pilot.
  • Smart law enforcement . IBM is helping the city of Chicago fight crime by digitizing their law enforcement practices and deploying smarter surveillance systems … even testing a system that uses audio sensors to direct cameras to locate gunshots, determine the caliber of gun fired and pinpoint its exact location – long before 9-1-1 is dialed.
  • Smart water . IBM and the Nature Conservancy are finding smarter ways to manage water supplies … providing analytics and research capabilities on the behavior of watersheds and the impact of human activities on freshwater supplies. IBM’s Stream Computing system will provide minute-to-minute deep analysis of New York's Hudson River via an integrated network of sensors, robotics and computational technology distributed throughout its 315 miles.
  • Inspiratiereis 2010 - IBM - Smarter planet small

    1. 1. Building The Smarter Planet
    2. 2. We know the world is becoming smaller… and flatter. Something else is going on that may ultimately have a greater impact on business and society. The world is about to become smarter . This is quite literally about how the world works… the world’s infrastructure is becoming intelligent.
    3. 3. In 2001, there were 60 million transistors for every human on the planet ... … by 2010 there will be 1 billion transistors per human… … each costing 1/10 millionth of a cent.
    4. 4. In 2005 there were 1.3 billion RFID tags in circulation… … by 2010 there will be 33 billion.
    5. 5. Worldwide mobile telephone subscriptions reached 3.3 billion in 2007 and expected to reach 4 billion by the end of this year
    6. 6. One billion camera phones were sold in 2007, up from 450 million in 2006 … 3G devices growing 30% annually.
    7. 7. An estimated 2 billion people will be on the Web by 2011 ... … and a trillion connected objects – cars, appliances, cameras, roadways, pipelines – comprising the "Internet of Things."
    8. 8. The reason we will all begin to transform our systems, operations, enterprises and personal lives to take advantage of a smart planet isn’t just because we can. It’s because we must.
    9. 9. We’ve thought about IT as the world of data centers, software, PCs, routers, bandwidth. We’ve thought about infrastructure as the world of buildings, factories, hospitals, roads, pipelines. Those worlds are converging. We’re confident that the world can become smarter. We’re building it with our clients.
    10. 10. IBM is helping ActiveCare Network monitor over 12,000 clinics and provide over two million patients with the proper delivery network for injections, vaccines and other pharmaceuticals. ACN is using IBM software to lower the cost of therapy by 90 percent and reduce time and cost required to develop patient and clinic applications by 60 percent. SMART HEALTH CARE
    11. 11. IBM leads 7 of the 11 smart meter deployments globally, building intelligence into utilities to lower costs for customers and better balance the grid. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has helped homeowners reduce energy costs up to 10 percent by turning ordinary thermostats into day traders for energy, ensuring the best cost for the customer and better load balancing for the grid. SMART ENERGY
    12. 12. IBM and Matiq are developing a smarter food tracking solution, the first-of-its-kind in the Nordics … … it uses RFID technology to track and trace meat and poultry from the farm, through the supply chain, to supermarket shelves. SMART TRACKING
    13. 13. IBM rebuilt the world’s currency markets -- one of the most advanced and complex exchanges -- to help understand risk in real-time. SMART FINANCIAL SYSTEMS
    14. 14. IBM is working with Brisbane, London, Singapore and Stockholm to deploy smarter traffic systems. At least 20 other cities have active bids to do the same. Stockholm has seen approximately 20 percent less traffic, a 12 percent drop in emissions and a reported 40,000 additional daily users of public transportation. SMART TRAFFIC
    15. 15. IBM is helping the city of Chicago fight crime by digitizing their law enforcement practices and deploying smarter surveillance systems … … even testing a system that uses audio sensors to direct cameras to locate gunshots, determine the caliber of gun fired and pinpoint its exact location – long before 9-1-1 is dialed. SMART LAW ENFORCEMENT
    16. 16. IBM and the Nature Conservancy are finding smarter ways to manage water supplies … providing analytics and research capabilities on the behavior of watersheds and the impact of human activities on freshwater supplies. IBM’s Stream Computing system will provide minute-to-minute deep analysis of New York's Hudson River via an integrated network of sensors, robotics and computational technology distributed throughout its 315 miles. SMART WATER

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