Natural resources monitoring in the Andean Cordillera

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Presentación de Miguel Saravia en la Sesión especial: Montains under review,que tuvo lugar en Pakista el 12 de Marzo de 2013 como parte del International Workshop on Integrated Use of Space Technologies for Food and Water Security, organized by United Nations Office in Pakistan, United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs and the Inter-Islamic Network on Space Science and Technology, hosted by Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission (SUPARCO) on behalf of the Government of Pakistan.

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  • In CONDESAN, we are committed with a sustainable management of natural resources, which contributes to overcome poverty of Andean populations and secures their well-being. For that we promote research processes focused on obtaining a regional view of how the populations of the Andean countries access and manage their natural resources. Our institutional mandate implies generating inputs to be used for decision making, incidence, capacity building, and policy. For that reason, CONDESAN is working with its partners and donors (like SDC and AECID) to establish monitoring systems that assess the impacts of social and environmental changes in the region. We apply an integrative approach, linking dynamics of land use and climate change to ecosystem processes that secure the societal benefits derived from the persistence of biodiversity, the provision of water and the maintenance of carbon stocks in the Andes. Concurrently, we aim to monitoring resource use patterns and its contribution to local livelihoods. During today presentation I have the intention to provide you with a quick overview of the Andes and the monitoring activities we are leading.
  • The tropical Andes are the longest and widest cool region in the tropics, as they extend over 1.5 million km2, from 11º N to 23º S, occupying an elevation range from around 600-800 m up to some 6,000 m above sea level.
  • Besides the characteristic Andean features of steep slopes, deep gorges, and wide valleys, a vast mountain plain, the Altiplano, extends at elevations above 3,500 m across much of southern Peru and western Bolivia. A large number of snow-capped peaks are found throughout the tropical Andes. The treeline occurs between 3,800–4,500 m near the equator and above 4,500 m from 15º S to the southern limit of the region Josse et al. 2011). Further, the tropical Andes top the list of worldwide hotspots for endemism and the number of species/ area ratio (Myers et al. 2000). Like the mountains in this part of the world, the Andes have been inhabited for millennia by people who have adapted to climatic and eco-geographical characteristics of these mountains, and their impacts. Extremely variable conditions People, cities at high and low altitudes …
  • In the Andean region, mountains are the habitat for more than 40 million people,concentrated in big cities that are growing exponentially. This drastic increase in urban population, causes geographical concentration of water demands. Urbanization is considered today a more serious threat forwater availability than climate change in the Andes.
  • Free trade agreements: the clearest case is the export agriculture in the deserts of Peruvian coast.
  • Free trade agreements: the clearest case is the export agriculture in the deserts of Peruvian coast.
  • Mining is another important driver affecting the mountains in the Andes, morethat 80% of their territory is already demanded for mining exploration. The images presente the actual mining projects activies in 3 andes Countries.
  • Climate change: vertical moves clearest driver, much clearer than changes in total rainfall, or precipitation patterns
  • Most information available in the Andean countries is based on simulations and modeling, rather than observed data. For instance, the density of hydrometeorological monitoring stations above 3.000 meters above sea level in the region is insufficient to allow an understanding of basic ecological processes in Andean ecosystems, and less so, to predict future trends linked to climate change. With this background, CONDESAN is currently leading different monitoring initiatives all over the mountain regions of the Andes. From Venezuela to Argentina. The objective is to lay the social, scientific and technological foundations for establishing monitoring systems that can assess the impacts of social and environmental changes in the region.
  • CONDESAN with the kind support of donors like SDC, supports the implementation of observation and monitoring systems in more than 20 sites along the Andes, ranging from Merida, Venezuela in the north, to Cumbres Chalchaquies, Argentina in the south. Among them, two have been chosen as integrated sites –Pichincha in Ecuador, and Tiquipaya in Bolivia– where an integrative approach is being employed, linking dynamics of land use and climate change to ecosystem processes expected to ensure the societal benefits of maintaining biodiversity, carbon stocks and water sources in the Andes.
  • Recognizing that timely and robust in­formation is critical for natural resource management in the region, CONDESAN seeks to integrate the monitoring system with decision-making processes at mul­tiple levels (e.g. local, regional) as a way to strengthen capacities and foster adap­tive management. Even though decision makers require continuously relevant in­formation to support the design of public policies, the generation of scientific in­formation in the Andean region, in addi­tion to being scarce and not replicated in time, has often been unarticulated from the needs and priorities of decision mak­ers.
  • In order to have comparable and suitable results, the project is designing simple and replicable methods and protocols in each thematic area, which are discussed and agreed upon among scientists working in the region, including The Global Observation Research Initiative In Alpine Environments (GLORIA) programme, and the Regional Initiative of Hydrological Monitoring in Andean Ecosystems (MHEA).
  • CONDESAN is aiming to articulate the on-going efforts of researchers with policymakers’ information needs to support decision making at regional, national and local levels. While local stakeholders, such as communities and local governments, are being engaged within the design and implementation of monitoring systems, at the national and regional level CONDESAN seeks to share its monitoring protocols with environmental authorities to complement governments’ on-going efforts in the Andes. In that vein, CONDESAN is promoting the exchange among researchers in the region and technical representatives and policymakers, as a basis for mutual learning and building bridges between policy and science. With the support of the General Secretariat of the Andean Community (SGCAN), UNESCO,UNEP,SDC and many other relevant actores we have been able to organize several activities in that direction.
  • Most information available in the Andean countries is based on simulations and modeling, rather than observed data. For instance, the density of hydrometeorological monitoring stations above 3.000 meters above sea level in the region is insufficient to allow an understanding of basic ecological processes in Andean ecosystems, and less so, to predict future trends linked to climate change. With this background, CONDESAN is currently leading different monitoring initiatives all over the mountain regions of the Andes. From Venezuela to Argentina. The objective is to lay the social, scientific and technological foundations for establishing monitoring systems that can assess the impacts of social and environmental changes in the region.
  • During this presentation we have briefly described the Andean context with special focus on the Andean mountain regions. We have also described the initiatives we are pursuing in the Andes. I want to take this final minute to share with you some learnings: 1. Monitoring is not just an academic exercise. We do it to take decisions on how better manage our natural resources. 2. Monitoring is a long term process that require to start delivering results very quickly. It is the only way to show the relevance and to receive continual political support and to get recognition from all stakeholders. 3. Monitoring cannot be done in isolation, it require a collaborative effort between several stakeholders. To develop collaborative mechanisms between civil society, independent research centers and governmental agencies require a dedicated and well planned effort. It is essential to jointly identify minimum methodological agreements as a pre­requisite to complement, and to ensure greater sustainability of monitoring systems. 4. Collecting data is just the beginning. Pay more serious attention on how to deliver and use it. Collecting data with the agreed protocols is just the beginning of a long process. We need to pay even more attention to how to deliver the data collected to the different stakeholders needing it and how the can better use it to manage the natural resources. 5. Trust not come form the solid high-tech used but by a verifiable in-field results. There is no trust in a monitoring system that not have a verifiable in-field component. We need to go beyond the technology,the software applications and the models behind and be in the field with the people who is requiring the information .
  • During this presentation we have briefly described the Andean context with special focus on the Andean mountain regions. We have also described the initiatives we are pursuing in the Andes. I want to take this final minute to share with you some learnings: 1. Monitoring is not just an academic exercise. We do it to take decisions on how better manage our natural resources. 2. Monitoring is a long term process that require to start delivering results very quickly. It is the only way to show the relevance and to receive continual political support and to get recognition from all stakeholders. 3. Monitoring cannot be done in isolation, it require a collaborative effort between several stakeholders. To develop collaborative mechanisms between civil society, independent research centers and governmental agencies require a dedicated and well planned effort. It is essential to jointly identify minimum methodological agreements as a pre­requisite to complement, and to ensure greater sustainability of monitoring systems. 4. Collecting data is just the beginning. Pay more serious attention on how to deliver and use it. Collecting data with the agreed protocols is just the beginning of a long process. We need to pay even more attention to how to deliver the data collected to the different stakeholders needing it and how the can better use it to manage the natural resources. 5. Trust not come form the solid high-tech used but by a verifiable in-field results. There is no trust in a monitoring system that not have a verifiable in-field component. We need to go beyond the technology,the software applications and the models behind and be in the field with the people who is requiring the information .
  • During this presentation we have briefly described the Andean context with special focus on the Andean mountain regions. We have also described the initiatives we are pursuing in the Andes. I want to take this final minute to share with you some learnings: 1. Monitoring is not just an academic exercise. We do it to take decisions on how better manage our natural resources. 2. Monitoring is a long term process that require to start delivering results very quickly. It is the only way to show the relevance and to receive continual political support and to get recognition from all stakeholders. 3. Monitoring cannot be done in isolation, it require a collaborative effort between several stakeholders. To develop collaborative mechanisms between civil society, independent research centers and governmental agencies require a dedicated and well planned effort. It is essential to jointly identify minimum methodological agreements as a pre­requisite to complement, and to ensure greater sustainability of monitoring systems. 4. Collecting data is just the beginning. Pay more serious attention on how to deliver and use it. Collecting data with the agreed protocols is just the beginning of a long process. We need to pay even more attention to how to deliver the data collected to the different stakeholders needing it and how the can better use it to manage the natural resources. 5. Trust not come form the solid high-tech used but by a verifiable in-field results. There is no trust in a monitoring system that not have a verifiable in-field component. We need to go beyond the technology,the software applications and the models behind and be in the field with the people who is requiring the information .
  • During this presentation we have briefly described the Andean context with special focus on the Andean mountain regions. We have also described the initiatives we are pursuing in the Andes. I want to take this final minute to share with you some learnings: 1. Monitoring is not just an academic exercise. We do it to take decisions on how better manage our natural resources. 2. Monitoring is a long term process that require to start delivering results very quickly. It is the only way to show the relevance and to receive continual political support and to get recognition from all stakeholders. 3. Monitoring cannot be done in isolation, it require a collaborative effort between several stakeholders. To develop collaborative mechanisms between civil society, independent research centers and governmental agencies require a dedicated and well planned effort. It is essential to jointly identify minimum methodological agreements as a pre­requisite to complement, and to ensure greater sustainability of monitoring systems. 4. Collecting data is just the beginning. Pay more serious attention on how to deliver and use it. Collecting data with the agreed protocols is just the beginning of a long process. We need to pay even more attention to how to deliver the data collected to the different stakeholders needing it and how the can better use it to manage the natural resources. 5. Trust not come form the solid high-tech used but by a verifiable in-field results. There is no trust in a monitoring system that not have a verifiable in-field component. We need to go beyond the technology,the software applications and the models behind and be in the field with the people who is requiring the information .
  • Natural resources monitoring in the Andean Cordillera

    1. 1. Natural Resources Monitoring in the Andean CordilleraConsortium for the Sustainable Development of the Andean Ecoregion March, 2013
    2. 2. AndeanContext
    3. 3. Important drivers in AndesUrbanization: drastic increase in urban population, ruralpopulation more or less stable. Causes geographicalconcentration of water demand Source: Presentation “Water Management and Climate Change”, by Axel Dourojeanni, Lima 2010. Source: Estrategia Andina para GIRH, CAN 2010.
    4. 4. Free trade agreements boost agroindustry for export, butlarge differences between countries
    5. 5. Land degradation: loss of regulation capacity in mountaincatchments Source: Wouter Buytaert, 2010.
    6. 6. Important drivers in Andes (3)
    7. 7. Climate change: vertical altitudinal moves certain,everything else very uncertain
    8. 8. MonitoringInitiatives
    9. 9. Andean Monitoring 22 sites: Venezuela to Argentina Covering more than 30 grades latitude (11N to 29S) More of 7000 km with social and environmental gradients Producing information to facilitate analysis from the local (micro) to the regional(macro) 2 integral sites * Tiquipaya (Cochabamba,Bolivia) * Pichincha - Lloa/Nono (Quito,Ecuador).
    10. 10. Our activities mobilize more than 100 researchers from natural and social science; and articulate more than 60 organizations all over the Andes, with local and national governments and regional entities (Andean Community)• Biodiversity monitoring• Carbon Monitoring• Hydrological monitoring• Land use and cover change monitoring• Livelihoods monitoring
    11. 11. We are promoting new cooperationagreements between governmental programsand regional/national research centersWe are experimenting new ways to make theinformation available for all interested parties:CHMs, Geoportals: http://paramo.cc.ic.ac.uk/espa/ www.condesan.org/gloria
    12. 12. We are generating different protocols for themonitoring activities:•Andean Forest monitoring: biodiversity,productivity: carbon•Monitoring Carbon in different gradients•Hydrological Monitoring in severalsubcatchments based on a set of minimalindicators.•Livelihood: Human vulnerability
    13. 13. CONDESAN is actively promoting the policydialogue,knowledge exchange and thecapacity building of all parties involved in themonitoring activities:•Policy dialogues•Producing papers•Regional and national technical workshops•Site visits
    14. 14. Finalremarks
    15. 15. Final remarks• Monitoring is not just an academic exercise. We do it to take decisions on how better manage our natural resources.• Monitoring is a long term process that require to start delivering results very quickly. It is the only way to show the relevance and to receive continual political support and to get recognition from all stakeholders.
    16. 16. Final remarks• Monitoring cannot be done in isolation, it require a collaborative effort between several stakeholders. To develop collaborative mechanisms between civil society, independent research centers and governmental agencies require a dedicated and well planned effort. It is essential to jointly identify minimum methodological agreements as a pre­ requisite to complement, and to ensure greater sustainability of monitoring systems.
    17. 17. Final remarks• Collecting data is just the beginning. Pay more serious attention on how to deliver and use it. Collecting data with the agreed protocols is just the beginning of a long process. We need to pay even more attention to how to deliver the data collected to the different stakeholders needing it and how the can better use it to manage the natural resources.
    18. 18. Final remarks• Trust not come form the solid high­tech used but by a verifiable in­field results. There is no trust in a monitoring system that not have a verifiable in­ field component. We need to go beyond the technology,the software applications and the models behind and be in the field with the people who is requiring the information.
    19. 19. GRACIAS‫آپ کا شکریہ‬ Construyendo soluciones juntos, desde nuestra Miguel.saravia@condesan.org http://www.condesan.org diversidad, http://www.infoandina.org desde nuestro saber, en armonía con el ambiente.

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