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UX in an agile environment, 6 December 2016, Copenhagen

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Tina Øvad: Agile UX
http://www.infinit.dk/dk/arrangementer/ux-in-an-agile-environment-copenhagen.htm

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UX in an agile environment, 6 December 2016, Copenhagen

  1. 1. AGILE UX TINA ØVAD ENGINEERING PSYCHOLOGIST, PHD DECEMBER 6TH 2016 How to survive in agile development as UX designer
  2. 2. Why agile?
  3. 3. MOTIVATION FOR BEING AGILE 1. You can’t gather all the requirements up front. 2. The requirements you do gather will change. 3. There is always more to do than time and money will allow. The Agile Samurai, Rasmusson et al. (2012)
  4. 4. AGILE FRAMEWORKS ARE A RESPONCE TO: • The rigidity of heavy methods • Bureaucracy introduced by heavy methods • Unpleasant surprises due to lack of visibility • Errors getting caught too late in the development • The myth that a well-defined process is more valuable than the people who use it
  5. 5. AGILE FRAMEWORKS ARE A RESPONCE TO: • The rigidity of heavy methods • Bureaucracy introduced by heavy methods • Unpleasant surprises due to lack of visibility • Errors getting caught too late in the development • The myth that a well-defined process is more valuable than the people who use it Agile development focuses on the value for the customer, since that is the most important in the end, hence: • What is of value for the customer? • How do we respond to customer requirements as a system?
  6. 6. So why is there a problem?
  7. 7. PROBLEM “The literature evaluating usability methods is fundamentally flawed by its lack of relevance to applied usability work” (Wixon, 2003) UX METHODS
  8. 8. PROBLEM “…the integration of usability engineering methods into software development life cycles is seldom realized in industrial settings.” (Moreno, 2013) UX METHODS
  9. 9. FORMALIZED UX PROCESSES
  10. 10. UX DELIVERABLES
  11. 11. AGENDA About Me UX Maturity Model Research: Processes and Methods Applied in the Real World UX deliverables Takeaways
  12. 12. ABOUT ME Tina Øvad Education Employments and collaborations • Engineering Psychologist • (Industrial) PhD in Information Systems, Agile UX
  13. 13. UX MATURITY MODEL Level Characteristics Description 8 Embedded UX UX design affects the corporate strategy, and UX activities are beyond design. 7 Integrated UX UX is integrated and used in every phase of the development process and the company begins to use UX data to determine what should be developed. 6 Systematic UX process UX design is used systematic and consistent in the company and there exist multiple activities and milestones. The company has a UX design standard or a centralized definition of preferred design patterns. 5 Managed UX An official UX group exists and a UX manager has the overall view over the UX activities throughout the company and products. However, UX design is not incorporated in the business model, but work is done to incorporate UX across the company. 4 UX breakthrough Management has noticed the ad hoc UX work and UX work gets a budget. UX work is now planned and the company relays on UX results. 3 UX grass root movement Ad hoc UX is the main theme at this level. A UX grass root movement is grabbing the “low-hanging fruits” and is beginning to conduct simple in-house user tests. 2 UX interest UX design is recognized, but UX work is developer-driven. The developers have to rely on their own intuition, personal judgment and logic. 1 Hostility towards UX “A good user is a dead user” describes this level very well. A company often has to have had a design catastrophe before the management is ready to consider working with UX design. Based on the usability maturity models by Nielsen (2006a), Nielsen (2006b) and Temkim (2008)
  14. 14. AGENDA About Me UX Maturity Model Research: Processes and Methods Applied in the Real World UX deliverables Takeaways
  15. 15. Research Processes and Methods
  16. 16. PARALLELT Source: Sy (2007)
  17. 17. Source: Kollmann, 2008 SATELLITE
  18. 18. Source: Singh, 2008 U-SCRUM
  19. 19. UX AND AGILE DEVELOPMENT The experiences with these approaches have so far been that: • None of the approaches have succeeded in integrating UX fully with agile development. • Lack of cross functional synergy of working interdisciplinary. • The software developers have not been used as a UX work resource. • Guidance is missing on how to integrate the two processes on a day-to-day basis. I investigated how to: • Conduct UX work in line with the agile developmentsprints. • Use software developers as UX work resource.
  20. 20. THE UX TASK DISTRIBUTION FOR MY APPROACH UX team UX team UX team Company with in-house UX specialists Company without in-house UX specialists Software team Software team Sprints Sprints External UX consultants External UX consultants
  21. 21. WHY USE THE SOFTWARE DEVELOPERS AS UX RESOURCE? By using the software developers as a UX work resource, it is possible to: • Facilitate a permenation of UX throughout the development • Make UX work more transparent • Facilitate a shared language in the development team • Minimize potential UX bottlenecks This is not a replacement of the existing UX team - it should be seen as an addition.
  22. 22. CURRENT METHODS IN THE UX TOOLBOX Focused Workshop AB-testing Contextual Interview
  23. 23. MATERIALS Three levels of guidance 1 2 3
  24. 24. AVERAGE TIME SPENT PERFORMING THE VARIOUS METHODS Tasks Hours spent Contextual Inquiry Focused Workshop AB-testing Contextual Interview Planning 3 hours 6 hours 2 hours 1.3 hours Conducting 4 hours 1.5 hours 1.9 hours 1.3 hours Analyzing 14 hours 5 hours 1.3 hours 3.4 hours Communicate results 2 hours 2 hours 0 0 Total 23 hours 14.5 hours 5.2 hours 6 hours
  25. 25. AGENDA About Me UX Maturity Model Research: Processes and Methods Applied in the Real World UX deliverables Takeaways
  26. 26. Applied in the Real World
  27. 27. TASKS, PREREQUISITES & BACKLOGS Requirements • Business (Product Owner) Executing • Team: • Business • Digital • IT • Bureau Approving • Business (Product Owner) Tasks Product backlog Sprint backlog • Epic 1 • Epic 2 • Epic 3 Wish list PO approves and prioritize • Wish 1 • Wish 2 • Wish 3 Backlogs Prerequisites: Agile ceremonies are followed Baseline is completed
  28. 28. STANDARD SPRINT - PROCES DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT AND TEST Developer Test • Create design for 2 • Create UI components for 2 • Create user stories for 2 • Gather information for 3 • Create to-be processes 0 1 2Sprint • Backend • Low UI • Gather information for 2 • Review accept. criteria for 2 • Advise on design from 1 • Create design for 3 • Create UI components for 3 • Create user stories for 3 • Gather information for 4 • Create to-be processes • Implement design from 1 • Test output from sprint 1 • Gather information for 3 • Review accept. criteria for 3 n … … … Design/ Business analysis Baseline Oneteam
  29. 29. DESIGN SPRINT - PROCES DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT AND TEST Developer Test • Create design • Create to-be processes • Gather information for next sprint Design Sprint (e.g. Google Ventures) • Participate in design sprint • Advise on technical issues • Quality work • Backend • Low UI • User tests Design/ Business analysis Oneteam
  30. 30. AGENDA About Me UX Maturity Model Research: Processes and Methods Applied in the Real World UX deliverables Takeaways
  31. 31. UX Deliverables
  32. 32. OVERVIEW: MOST EFFECTIVE DELIVERABLES FOR EACH AUDIENCE Source: Laubheimer, 2016 Managers CustomersDevelopers Usability/analytics report User journey map Pixel perfect mockup Static wireframe Interactive prototype Flowchart Sitemap Front-end style guide
  33. 33. THREE KEY FACTORS FOR SUCCESSFUL UX DELIVERABLES 1. Understandable 2. Convincing 3. Prescriptive • Contain insights that do not require extensive UX knowledge. • Have a format and level of polish matching the UX maturity of the organization. • Use as few symbols, graphical styles, and icons as possible. • Are insights and recommendations specific and actionable? • If it is a design or specification deliverable - is it clear enough to be implemented, or is it still ambiguous? o What are the next steps? o Who has responsibility moving forward, and why? Source: Laubheimer, 2016
  34. 34. QUESTIONS THAT NEED TO BE ANSWERED Your questions for your stakeholders: • What are requirements and scope? • What are key tasks and scenarios? • How is the structure and information architecture? • Is a particular design idea usable? • Is a particular feature discoverable and/or desirable? Stakeholder questions for you: • Developers: What do I need to build? • Executives: Will this have a competitive edge? • Product: What makes this excellent/unique/sellable? • Customer: Does this represent our identity and needs? • QA: Is this specific enough to test? • Project management: Can this be achieved on time/within budget? Source: Laubheimer, 2016
  35. 35. • Specific • Indicates severity • Includes analysis as to what specific attributes of the design caused the issue • Recommendations are actionable • Includes representative user quotes • Consider using prototypes as only specification document CHECKLIST FOR FINDINGS Source: Laubheimer, 2016
  36. 36. AGENDA About Me UX Maturity Model Research: Processes and Methods Applied in the Real World UX deliverables Takeaways
  37. 37. Takeawys
  38. 38. TAKEAWAYS • Find the UX maturity level for the company and use it to make an overall UX strategy • As a team consider what usability and UX work needs to be conducted to successed with the work at hand • Modify usability and UX methods to suit the maturity level of the company and the task at hand (you might start by using our UX Toolbox) • Find the level and complexity of UX deliverables suitable for the specific task and team • Look into the opportunities of establishing a formalized UX process (use existing processes as a lifter if possible) • Consider using the developers as a UX work resource Something you can do tomorrow: • Bring usability and UX findings to daily stand ups • Track usability and UX findings in the team wiki/Jira(not as bugs!)
  39. 39. tina@oevad.com tinaoevad http://oevad.com/ux- toolbox.html
  40. 40. REFERENCES Kollmann, J., 2008. Designing the User Experience in an Agile Context. Faculty of Life Science, University College, London Laubheimer, P., 2016. UX Deliverables. NN/gr. UX Conference [slides] Moreno, A. M., Seffah, A., Capilla, R. and Sanchez-Segura, M. I. 2013. HCI Practices for Building Usable Software. Computer, vol. 46, no. 4, pp. 100–102. Nielsen, J., 2006a. Corporate Usability Maturity: Stages 1-4. [Online] Available at: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/usability- maturity-stages-1-4/ Nielsen, J., 2006b. Corporate Usability Maturity: Stages 5-8. [Online] Available at: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/usability- maturity-stages-5-8/ Rasmusson, J., Nishimura, N., Kadotani, S., Kondo, S., Tsunokake, T., 2012. The Agile Samurai. Ohmsha Ltd. Singh, M., 2008. U-SCRUM: An Agile Methodology for Promoting Usability. Presented at the Agile 2008 Conference, IEEE Computer Society. Sy, D., 2007. Adapting Usability Investigations for Agile User-centered Design. JUS - J. Usability Stud. Vol. 2, 112–132. Temkin, B., 2008. The Customer Experience Journey. [Online] Available at:http://experiencematters.wordpress.com/2008/09/18/the-customer-experience-journey/ Wixon, D. 2003. Evaluating Usability Methods: Why the Current Literature Fails the Practitioner. Interactions, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 28–34.

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