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Supporting school improvement through inspection

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Presentazione di Lee Nothern del HMI Ostfed del governo britannico relativa al suo intervento al convegno internazionale "Migliorare la scuola" (14-15 Maggio 2015, Napoli), organizzato dall'Indire.

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Supporting school improvement through inspection

  1. 1. ‘Supporting school improvement through inspection’ International conference: ‘Improve the school’ Naples, Italy - 14 May 2015 Lee Northern HMI Ofsted, England
  2. 2. Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted)  Founded in 1992  Ofsted is a non-ministerial government department  Headed by Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector (HMCI), Sir Michael Wilshaw  Independent of the Department for Education (DfE)  Ofsted reports ‘without fear or favour’  HMCI reports directly to a Parliamentary Select Committee, made up of Members of Parliament from different political parties, and must ‘lay before Parliament’ an Annual Report
  3. 3. Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted) Parliament Education Select Committee Government Head of State: the Queen Department for Education Department for Business, Industry & Skills Non-executive Board Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector Funding Department for Justice
  4. 4.  Inspected compliance with new laws on working ages, hours and conditions  Inspected provision of factory schools for children  Did not produce published reports on individual factories  Did not cover ALL types of factory where children worked  Did NOT focus on the outcomes for the children The first inspections, 1833
  5. 5.  Introduced to ensure accountability over public funds  Professional inspectors  Published report to Parliament  Commented on value Inspection of schools, from 1840
  6. 6. The purpose of school inspection The inspection of a school provides an independent external evaluation of its effectiveness and a diagnosis of what it should do to improve. Ofsted’s inspections of schools perform three essential functions. They: provide parents with an expert and independent assessment of how well a school is performing, and help those who are choosing a school provide information about the work of schools, whether minimum standards are being met, and provides confidence in the use of public money, as well as indicating where improvements are needed promote the improvement of individual schools and the education system as a whole. (The Education and Inspections Act, 2006)
  7. 7. ‘The effective monitoring and evaluation of schools is central to the continuous improvement of student learning: Schools need feedback on their performance to help them identify how to improve their practices; and schools should be accountable for their performance.’ OECD strongly supports external reviews of school performance ‘Synergies for better learning’ (2013)
  8. 8. Inspection reports
  9. 9. Reports are set out to show how schools should seek to improve
  10. 10. Inspection reports: recommendations
  11. 11. Ofsted’s 2012/13 Annual Report identified some key barriers to raising standards: weak leadership and ineffective school governance mediocre teaching and too much variation in quality pockets of weak educational provision in parts of the country significant underachievement of children from low-income families, particularly white children. Ofsted’s ‘Annual Report’
  12. 12. Where schools decline, or improve too slowly, weak leadership of teaching is often the biggest factor In teaching, it was the lack of leadership that mattered more than the quality of teaching Analysis of reasons affecting 114 schools that declined markedly
  13. 13. Thematic and survey reports
  14. 14. The pattern of poor achievement for the more able: Too little challenge in lessons The core reason is that PLANNING is not good enough Tasks are too easy Low expectations of what will be done Assessment systems do not identify pupils’ potential or their prior learning Teachers’ subject knowledge is weak Compounded by – lack of checking on progress in lessons, poor guidance in marking Compounded by – poor time management Compounded by – lack of application ACROSS subjects Tasks are same for all Compounded by – lack of chance to develop writing and speaking
  15. 15. Guidance & inspection criteria for inspectors (January 2015): How we inspect Publicly available on our website
  16. 16. How does inspection support school improvement? Inspection: raises expectations by setting standards provides challenge and impetus where improvement is needed clearly identifies strengths and weaknesses recommends specific priorities for improvement for the school and, when appropriate, checks on and promotes subsequent progress promotes rigour in the way that schools evaluate their own performance monitors the progress and performance of weaker schools, and challenges and supports them to improve.
  17. 17. Impact of school inspections
  18. 18. Add presentation title to master slide | 19 School inspection framework (Sept 2014) ‘Inspection has the strongest impact on school improvement when the school understands the evidence and findings that have led to the judgements, and what it needs to do to improve.’
  19. 19. Investigation report: School leaders’ views on the impact of inspection (March 2015) 22,800 responses to Ofsted’s post-inspection survey. (2009-2014) 98% of school leaders said ‘The inspection identified clear recommendations for improvement’ Schools are surveyed immediately after inspection: Response rate: typically ~ 75% 98% of school leaders said ‘I will use the inspection recommendations to move the school forward’
  20. 20. Add presentation title to master slide | 21 Inspection does not have to deliver new insight in order to support improvement A new headteacher explained how the inspection gave them confidence in securing improvement: ‘The inspection was very helpful to confirm that the impact and actions put in place were the correct path. Inspectors gave confidence to the leadership team that we were taking effective action and validated our judgements, evidence and improvement plans.’
  21. 21. Changes made are dominated by driving the improvement of teaching and learning:
  22. 22. http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/teacher-blog/2013/oct/22/school-ofsted-stockholm-syndrome ‘Are heads too caught up in what Ofsted wants? If it’s all about striving to please the inspectors, schools will never truly improve’ Side effects?
  23. 23. ‘Looking at, not looking for’ October 2014: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ofsted-inspections-clarification-for-schools Ofsted does not: •specify how planning should be set out •expect to see any specific frequency, type or volume of marking - these are for the school to decide •favour any particular teaching style. School leaders and teachers should decide for themselves how best to teach. •grade the quality of teaching for individual lessons •require teachers to undertake additional work specifically for the inspection.
  24. 24. Schools are inspected: •If they are new •If they were previously grade 3 or grade 4 •If risk assessment suggests their performance is falling Grade 1: outstanding •No further inspection scheduled (exempt) •Likely to be asked to support weaker schools nationally or to take them on as new academies •May become a ‘teaching school’ Grade 2: good •Inspected every 5 years •Expected to provide some support to weaker local schools Grade 3: requires improvement •Invited to seminar •Visited by inspector within a few weeks to discuss plans & actions •Inspector will discuss package of possible support measures •Will be re-inspected after two years •If found to be Grade 3 three times, then this is evidence that leadership is inadequate Grade 4: inadequate •Can be placed into SPECIAL MEASURES •Ofsted will visit each term and report on progress until school is found to be at least grade 3 •Local authority can act to change the governors •Governors can act to change the headteacher •Government encourages these schools to partner with outstanding schools or to close and re-open as academies. 2012: ‘Every child deserves a GOOD school.’ Government strategy is for weaker schools to be supported by stronger schools on their improvement. 20% 60% 17% 3%
  25. 25. What happens in grade 4 (‘Special Measures’) schools? OFSTED: •One inspector is allocated to the school throughout the next stages •This inspector leads a monitoring visit every 3 months, focusing on the school’s weaknesses •These visits are likely to include much greater dialogue about improvement •The school will be re-inspected after no more than two years. OFSTED: •One inspector is allocated to the school throughout the next stages •This inspector leads a monitoring visit every 3 months, focusing on the school’s weaknesses •These visits are likely to include much greater dialogue about improvement •The school will be re-inspected after no more than two years.
  26. 26. Schools are inspected: •If they are new •If they were previously grade 3 or grade 4 •If risk assessment suggests their performance is falling Grade 1: outstanding •No further inspection scheduled (exempt) •Likely to be asked to support weaker schools nationally or to take them on as new academies •May become a ‘teaching school’ Grade 2: good •Inspected every 5 years •Expected to provide some support to weaker local schools Grade 3: requires improvement •Invited to seminar •Visited by inspector within a few weeks to discuss plans & actions •Inspector will discuss package of possible support measures •Will be re-inspected after two years •If found to be Grade 3 three times, then this is evidence that leadership is inadequate Grade 4: inadequate •Can be placed into SPECIAL MEASURES •Ofsted will visit each term and report on progress until school is found to be at least grade 3 •Local authority can act to change the governors •Governors can act to change the headteacher •Government encourages these schools to partner with outstanding schools or to close and re-open as academies. 2012: ‘Every child deserves a GOOD school.’ Government strategy is for weaker schools to be supported by stronger schools on their improvement. 20% 60% 17% 3%
  27. 27. What about the grade 3 schools? Changes were made from September 2012: • The ‘satisfactory’ grading was replaced with ‘Requires Improvement’ • For any school in this group, the report explained clearly why it was not yet good
  28. 28. What happens to schools that ‘require improvement’? School judged to REQUIRE IMPROVEMENT School is invited to a REQUIRES IMPROVEMENT SEMINAR An HMI is allocated to the school and makes an initial MONITORING VISIT that focuses on improvement planning The HMI may arrange a series of support activities or a further monitoring visits The HMI may suggest an early re-inspection REQUIRE IMPROVEMENT schools will always be re-inspected within two years A school that is still not good on its THIRD inspection will be considered INADEQUATE.
  29. 29. Add presentation title to master slide | 30 What does this look like in detail? ‘Through the lens of inspection’ workshops for senior leaders Surgeries for governors and headteachers English and maths conferences across local authorities Local seminars and workshops eg FSM, more-able Seminars and training for middle leaders Good practice working groups, using groups of schools with a strong track record to support other schools Targeting some schools for early re-inspection Focus on RI schools in meetings with local authority staff peer to peer review projects survey activity eg reading, mathematics Further HMI monitoring visits to schools – may not lead to a letter
  30. 30. ….and inspections show that a greater proportion of RI schools are improving than satisfactory schools did in the past
  31. 31. Add presentation title to master slide | 32 Changes in schools judged to require improvement In responses to our ‘impact’ survey, school leaders of RI schools told us what they had worked on as a result of the inspection. Most of these related to improving the management or quality of aspects of teaching and learning. Common actions included:  developing clearer strategies for marking and assessment  improving professional development and training programmes  introducing tighter processes for monitoring and evaluation  improving approaches to managing behaviour  making better use of data for tracking and evaluation.
  32. 32. Thank you. Any questions?
  33. 33. Over time, a greater understanding and acceptance of the RI ‘message’… Question: Overall, do you agree that being judged to ‘require improvement’ rather than to be ‘satisfactory’ has strengthened the focus of leaders and governors on becoming a good school? April 2013 Feb 2014
  34. 34. HMI visits to ‘requires improvement’ schools are seen increasingly positively: Question: Do you agree or disagree that the visit helped you to identify weaknesses in the school’s planning that might otherwise have restricted the school’s ability to improve? April 2013 March 2014
  35. 35. Provider surveys have been generally positive…. Data from April 2013
  36. 36. Most of the activities in ‘RI’ work are seen as useful by headteachers Frequency of activity (as reported by schools) - volume Usefulness of activity - % useful
  37. 37. What do reports tell us? Schools that ‘got to good’ ensured effective governance, had robust systems and good leadership – especially of teaching Thirty RI schools that ‘got to good’ : How successfully they had resolved their previous areas for improvement – issues of leadership, management and governance
  38. 38. Whereas ‘Stuck’ RI schools lack the capability to resolve key weaknesses: Nineteen RI schools that stayed at RI, still with G3 for leadership: how successfully they resolved previous areas for improvement at re-inspection. RI evaluation – spring 2014
  39. 39. Our 2012 Annual Report highlighted weaknesses at local authority level:

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