Disaster Recovery for Charities

757 views

Published on

Disaster Recovery Planning for Charities

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
757
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Ok so in this morning session we are going to dip into the process of creating a DR plan. We will start with a definition of DR planning Then we will look at How you go about creating your plan Then how to keep the plan up to date Finally Ten steps to get you started.
  • Disaster recovery is the process, policies and procedures related to preparing for recovery or continuation of technology infrastructure critical to an organisation after a natural or human-induced disaster. Disaster recovery is a subset of business continuity. While business continuity involves planning for keeping all aspects of a business functioning in the midst of disruptive events, disaster recovery focuses on the IT or technology systems that support business function
  • ISO 270001 BS25999
  • 40 % of organisations that shut-down three days or more failed with in 36 months Contingency Planning and Management Magazine
  • Disaster Recovery for Charities

    1. 1. Disaster Recovery Planning For Charities David Watson Indigo
    2. 2. Introductions – David Watson <ul><li>Managing Director Indigo Group
    3. 3. IT Partner Milsted Langdon
    4. 4. IT Consultant Robson Taylor
    5. 5. Technical Consultant CompuAdd
    6. 6. Microsoft Qualified Professional
    7. 7. Prince 2 Project Manager </li></ul>
    8. 8. Agenda <ul><li>What is Disaster Recovery Planning
    9. 9. Building Technology Recovery Plans
    10. 10. Managing Recovery Plans
    11. 11. Ten benefits of DR planning </li></ul>
    12. 12. What is DR Planning?
    13. 13. Getting started <ul><li>Why is it important? </li><ul><ul><li>Fire
    14. 14. Flood
    15. 15. Snow
    16. 16. Security
    17. 17. Power failure
    18. 18. Pandemics
    19. 19. Strikes
    20. 20. Shortages
    21. 21. Terrorism </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Real life </li><ul><ul><li>? </li></ul></ul></ul>
    22. 23. Getting started <ul><li>Why is it important? </li><ul><ul><li>Fire
    23. 24. Flood
    24. 25. Snow
    25. 26. Security
    26. 27. Power failure
    27. 28. Pandemics
    28. 29. Strikes
    29. 30. Shortages
    30. 31. Terrorism </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Real life </li><ul><ul><li>Taunton Fun Farm
    31. 32. ? </li></ul></ul></ul>
    32. 34. Getting started <ul><li>Why is it important? </li><ul><ul><li>Fire
    33. 35. Flood
    34. 36. Snow
    35. 37. Security
    36. 38. Power failure
    37. 39. Pandemics
    38. 40. Strikes
    39. 41. Terrorism </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Real life </li><ul><ul><li>Taunton Fun Farm
    40. 42. Taunton Flood 2008
    41. 43. Twice in 2010
    42. 44. HMRC
    43. 45. Regular bi annual
    44. 46. Swine Flu
    45. 47. Fuel Drivers Strike
    46. 48. 7/7 </li></ul></ul></ul>
    47. 49. Regulatory Requirements <ul><li>Who is responsible for risk management in a charity?
    48. 50. The responsibility for the management and control of a charity rests with the trustee body and therefore their involvement in the key aspects of the risk management process is essential, particularly in setting the parameters of the process and reviewing and considering the results.
    49. 51. What are the legal requirements for charities in relation to risk management?
    50. 52. Charities that are required by law to have their accounts audited must make a risk management statement in their trustees' annual report confirming that '...the charity trustees have given consideration to the major risks to which the charity is exposed and satisfied themselves that systems or procedures are established in order to manage those risks.' (Charities (Accounts and Reports) Regulations 2008
    51. 53. Major risks are those risks that have a major impact and a probable or highly probable likelihood of occurring. If they occurred they would have a major impact on some or all of the following areas: </li><ul><ul><li>governance;
    52. 54. operations;
    53. 55. finances;
    54. 56. environmental or external factors such as public opinion or relationship with funders;
    55. 57. a charity's compliance with law or regulation. </li></ul></ul></ul>
    56. 58. Positive Impact of DR Planning <ul><li>Improved Business processes
    57. 59. Improved Technology
    58. 60. Fewer Disruptions
    59. 61. Higher quality services </li></ul>
    60. 62. Building your plan <ul><li>Build a team
    61. 63. Identify Critical services
    62. 64. Determine dependencies
    63. 65. Establish Maximum tolerable disruption
    64. 66. Check if expectations are feasible </li></ul>
    65. 67. Putting it into Practice <ul><li>Disaster declaration procedure
    66. 68. Emergency Contact lists and trees
    67. 69. Damage Assessment procedures
    68. 70. System recovery procedure
    69. 71. Transition to normal operations </li></ul>
    70. 72. Managing your Plan <ul><li>Testing </li><ul><li>Paper tests
    71. 73. Walkthrough tests
    72. 74. Parallel testing
    73. 75. Cut-over testing </li></ul><li>Updating </li><ul><li>Technology Changes
    74. 76. Business Changes
    75. 77. Personnel Changes
    76. 78. External Changes </li></ul></ul>
    77. 79. Ten Benefits of DR Planning <ul><li>Improved chances of surviving “The Big One”
    78. 80. Move up the Maturity Ladder
    79. 81. Improve your processes
    80. 82. Improve your technology
    81. 83. Higher availability of systems
    82. 84. Reducing Disruptive events
    83. 85. Reduced insurance premiums
    84. 86. Understanding your organisation better
    85. 87. Complying with Regulatory environment
    86. 88. Better quality service to your customers </li></ul>
    87. 89. Over to you...

    ×