team56

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team56

  1. 1. Front Slide Employability and Skill Development Team Name Ashish Ranjan Rajiv Ranjan Poojan Kalyan Bhaskar Vatsal Jain
  2. 2. Problems 80 % of India’s workforce possesses no identifiable marketable skills - A Planning Commission study 85 % of graduates are unemployable in India’s high growth industries - NASSCOM report of 2012 48 % of Indian employers face difficulties in filling vacancies - International Labor Organization survey million people enrolled in vocation courses in China by 2012 90 5 million people enrolled in vocation courses in India by that time National Skill Development Corporation (NSDC) in 2009 on a private public partnership model The gap between education to employability needs to be bridged for a sustainable growth model
  3. 3. Aiming for a Demographic Disaster Dropouts • 50 % students drop out between class 1 - 8 • Approx. 20-21 million after Class VIII Formal training capacity • Available only for - 2.3 million Lack of new & innovative trades in VET to attract young children's and meet the Industry requirements Though there is a Gap of 18.7 million. In India so far we have identified only about 150 trades with a choice of 3000 vocational streams and only 2-3% of the youth (15-29 yrs) goes in for formal vocational training. Obviously there is a big Gap between the Aspirations and the Availability. Demand Side Supply Side Skill development • 1.3 million Indians over the next five years will be untrained and undereducated • Further crises to be caused by mismatch between jobs available and skill shortage Thus there is a Gap between the Needs of the Industry and the Availability • Children drop out as they do not see the relevance of education to their lives • Parents, the decision maker would rather have their children enter the workplace as they do not see how learning to read, write, and do sums can help put bread on the table • Education should have a tangible end • Education should aim at improving future employment prospects Reasons
  4. 4. Lack of Jobs even at college levels Dropouts • 50 % students drop out between class 1 - 8 • Approx. 20-21 million after Class VIII Formal training capacity • Available only for - 2.3 million Lack of new & innovative trades in VET to attract young children's and meet the Industry requirements Though there is a Gap of 18.7 million. In India so far we have identified only about 150 trades with a choice of 3000 vocational streams and only 2-3% of the youth (15-29 yrs) goes in for formal vocational training. Obviously there is a big Gap between the Aspirations and the Availability. Demand Side Supply Side Skill development • 1.3 million Indians over the next five years will be untrained and undereducated • Further crises to be caused by mismatch between jobs available and skill shortage Thus there is a Gap between the Needs of the Industry and the Availability • Children drop out as they do not see the relevance of education to their lives • Parents, the decision maker would rather have their children enter the workplace as they do not see how learning to read, write, and do sums can help put bread on the table • Education should have a tangible end • Education should aim at improving future employment prospects Reasons
  5. 5. • Introduce vocational education streams across school boards in the country which is related to current industrial situation • Mandatory accreditation rating of higher educational institutions, particularly schools offering professional education, to industry requirement, including the extent to which industry inputs are taken in drafting curricula. • The curriculum and the mandate needs to be updated, to focus on the demands of today’s industry and the reality of where jobs lie. • To implement a dedicated team of 5-6 members which take care of all the skill set and placement related processes – Placement officer (placement cell i.e) – English tutor – Senior Admin to regulate placements and other events – One PR person for marketing – One two similar role • Curriculum Changes – Like permanent two hour classes of English – Revised English and soft skills courses to be introduced irrespective of the type of degree/diploma • Improving industry connect through our team • Improving the interaction of students thru: – Part time job – Intern culture – Volunteer • Involving more SMEs into the placement process (work of Placement cell) Solutions: At School and College Level SchoolCollege
  6. 6. Vocational Education and Training – Synergies between Education (including modern vocational education training/skill development), Innovation (converting ideas into wealth and employment) and Entrepreneurship should be encouraged – To be launched in partnership with educational institutions to give multiple level qualifications – More learner-centred and activity-based approach for students – Teacher training programs to be more frequent and industry oriented to keep them well informed of current requirements in the labour market – Focus on “national level competency” development and no center/region based reports – Clear assessment guidelines and competency standards to encourage talents – Designed to deliver latest industry standard training, in consultation with industry experts
  7. 7. Encouraging entrepreneurship • Creating a platform of budding start-ups to share resources among each other and get visibility through associations • Recognition and rewards right from the local up to the national level will energize and encourage new entrepreneurs. Need to demystify perceptions of risk and failure: by facilitating dissemination of best practices as well as documentation of unsuccessful ideas in the entrepreneurial space. Basic guidelines and support system by industry experts for new firms Availability of seed funding to aspiring entrepreneurs: Through positive efforts on the part of banks, financial institutions, VCs, angel investors and private equity (PE) funds
  8. 8. Encouraging entrepreneurship • Agriculture and other activities: Crop production, Plantation, Forestry, Livestock, Fishing, Mining and Quarrying. Level 1 • Trading services: Wholesale and retail trade; Hotels and restaurantsLevel 2 • Old economy or traditional sectors: Manufacturing, Electricity, Gas and Water supply Level 3 • Emerging sectors (including knowledge intensive sectors): IT, Finance, Insurance and Business services, Construction, Community, Social & Personal Services, Supply Chain, TransportStorage- Communications etc. Level 4
  9. 9. Youth Level Development Youth-led Development Peacechild Foundation first defined the concept of youth-led development. Today many other UN agencies are also promoting and pursuing the idea of youth-led development as a key tool in involving youth in the development process. The Five Principles of Youth Led Development. 1. Youth define their own development goals and objectives; 2. Youth have a social and physical space to participate in development and to be regularly consulted; 3. Adult mentorship and peer-to-peer mentorship are encouraged; 4. Youth act as role models to help other youth engage in development; and, 5. Youth are integrated into all local and national development programs and frameworks.
  10. 10. • Parameters like – Total placed – Total interns increased – Average increase in per capita income of students passing out – Number of colleges to be visited by recruiters for the first time Impact Analysis and Policy changes Policy Changes • Changing curriculum • Redefining hierarchy for the new team formed • Central monitoring and maintaining system • Common portal for information exchange for similar graduation streams
  11. 11. • State of the Urban Youth, India 2012, Employment, Livelihoods, Skills, Global Urban • Youth Employment and Unemployment in India, S. Mahendra Dev and M. Venkatanarayana, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research (IGIDR) • Technical Vocational Education & Training (Existing Systems, Schemes, Models and Best Practices), Mrs. Sushma Berlia • INTEGRATING VOCATIONAL STREAM IN SECONDARY SCHOOL: A QUALITATIVE CASE STUDY, Mohamad Hisyam Mohd. Hashim • http://knowledgecommission.gov.in/downloads/documents/NKC_En trepreneurship.pdf • http://sajournalofeducation.co.za/index.php/saje/article/viewFile/64/ 69 • http://www.kln.ac.lk/uokr/ASAIHL/SubThemeA8.pdf Appendix and references

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