Pathologist role in breast cancer

1,713 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,713
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
39
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Pathologist role in breast cancer

  1. 1. Dr Imrana Tanvir Asst Prof FMH
  2. 2. <ul><li>What does a pathologist do? </li></ul><ul><li>Why should women be aware of the pathologist? </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>FNA services </li></ul><ul><li>Reporting of surgical specimens </li></ul><ul><li>core biopsy </li></ul><ul><li>WLE </li></ul><ul><li>Mastectomy </li></ul><ul><li>Therapeutic marker </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Pathological examination is the gold standard for diagnosis in cancer </li></ul><ul><li>Its role has also included the elucidation of etiology, pathogenesis, clinicopathological correlation, and prognostication. </li></ul><ul><li>It has shifted the focus to prognostication, with increased attention being paid to the identification of morphological features and immunohistochemical markers of prognostic relevance. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of breast lumps is an important part of the triple assessment of the palpable breast lump - clinical </li></ul><ul><li>- radiological </li></ul><ul><li>- pathological </li></ul><ul><li>It has reduced the number of open breast biopsies. </li></ul>
  6. 13. <ul><li>Very rare </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pain </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bleeding/hematoma: Pressure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Infection: Proper cleaning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pneumothorax: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vasovagal reaction: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Needle tract seeding? No </li></ul></ul>
  7. 14. <ul><li>Is another method of 'tissue diagnosis‘ </li></ul><ul><li>A more invasive procedure than FNA </li></ul><ul><li>- involves making a small incision. </li></ul><ul><li>-A large needle is passed through this incision </li></ul><ul><li>-several narrow samples of the tissue are taken. </li></ul><ul><li>Ultrasound or mammographic guidance may be needed. </li></ul>
  8. 15. <ul><li>Is faster, less expensive than surgical biopsy. </li></ul><ul><li>Less tissue is removed resulting in no deformity or scaring. </li></ul>
  9. 17. <ul><li>CRITERIA </li></ul><ul><li>Primary Tumor </li></ul><ul><li>– size </li></ul><ul><li>– Cellularity </li></ul><ul><li>– Invasive vs in situ </li></ul><ul><li>– Margins </li></ul><ul><li>Axillary Lymph Nodes </li></ul><ul><li>– Number of positive nodes </li></ul><ul><li>– Size of metastases </li></ul><ul><li>– Extranodal extension </li></ul>
  10. 18. Sup Med Lat Inf Ant
  11. 19. ant sup inf
  12. 22. Lymph Nodes <ul><li>Sentinel lymph node </li></ul><ul><li>Axillary dissection </li></ul>
  13. 23. Therapeutic and Prognostic Markers <ul><li>ESTROGEN RECEPTORS </li></ul><ul><li>PROGESTERON RECEPTORS </li></ul><ul><li>HER 2/Neu </li></ul>
  14. 24. <ul><li>Pathologists continue to play their traditional role in diagnosis. </li></ul><ul><li>Pathologists now have the additional role of identifying biomarkers responsive to therapeutic manipulation. </li></ul><ul><li>Playing an inextricable role as diagnostic oncologists in the management of breast cancer. </li></ul>

×