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Psychological safety in the workplace. Promoting mental health, resilience and a positive workplace culture.

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Although many employers understand their duty of care for physical health and safety, promoting mental health and wellbeing is not always a priority.

But many forward thinking businesses are now giving further attention to mental health and in particular, how to create a psychologically safe and resilient working environment.

Our Psychological Safety in the Workplace slideshare explores why mental health and resilience is important and how building psychological safety can bring benefits such as improved productivity, innovation and teamwork.

With top tips and links to further reading and resources, we hope you find this slideshare interesting and it gets you thinking about psychological safety as part of your approach to workplace wellbeing.

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Psychological safety in the workplace. Promoting mental health, resilience and a positive workplace culture.

  1. 1. Psychological safety in the workplace. Promoting mental health, resilience and a positive workplace culture. A SlideShare by IDG ©ImprovementDevelopmentGrowthLimited2017
  2. 2. Mental Health in the Workplace. The World Health Organisation defines health and wellbeing as “a state of complete physical, psychological and social well-being. Not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” And although many employers understand their duty of care for physical health and safety, promoting mental health and wellbeing is not always a priority.
  3. 3. Why should employers care? There are two reasons why the health and wellbeing of employees including their mental health should be a key concern for organisations. They are linked to your duty of care as an employer but also how it affects your productivity and performance.
  4. 4. Facts and Stats • 15m days were lost to the mental health conditions of stress, depression and anxiety in 2014 – an increase of 24% since 2009 (ONS). Issues around mental health cost the UK economy around £70bn a year (OECD). • Almost 1 in 6 people of working age have a diagnosable mental health condition (Public Health England/The Work Foundation)
  5. 5. • 15% of UK organisations don’t place any focus on the mental health and wellbeing of employees, with 3/10 employees saying their company does not do anything to promote mental wellbeing in the workplace (YouGov 2016). And yet employers are spending £9bn each year on all sick pay and associated costs (Institute for Public Policy Research 2017). • Work can be a cause of stress and common mental health problems. In 2014/15, 9.9m days were lost to work-related stress, depression or anxiety (Public Health England/The Work Foundation).
  6. 6. “The twin goals of increasing levels of staff wellbeing and engagement should be a major priority for UK business leaders – you can’t have one without the other” Emma Mamo, Head of Workplace Wellbeing
  7. 7. What is psychological safety? Forward thinking businesses are now giving further attention to mental health and in particular, how to create a psychologically safe and resilient working environment. But what is it?
  8. 8. Psychological Safety is the mental health equivalent of physical safety. It is achieved by developing an environment where your employees are able to think, feel and behave in a way that supports their effectiveness. In a psychologically safe organisation, managers actively look to prevent harm or danger to mental health.
  9. 9. It has been defined as "being able to show and employ one's self without fear of negative consequences of self-image, status or career" (Kahn 1990). In psychologically safe teams, it is thought that team members feel accepted and respected. Alongside mental health and employee engagement benefits, it is also thought to benefit team dynamics, learning and innovation.
  10. 10. “The very best organisations understand that to achieve sustainable results, their people need to be performing at their peak, both physically and psychologically” Paul Devoy, Head of Investors in People
  11. 11. Why psychological safety? As an important driver of workplace health and wellbeing strategy, a psychologically safe environment and approach not only supports improved engagement and attendance, but also helps employees to be more confident in taking interpersonal risks.
  12. 12. • Employees feel able to constructively challenge ways of working without fear of retribution. • They know any challenges to working practices are valued. • Colleagues will ask for help or guidance knowing it will be met with a positive response. • Team members know being different is respected and not undermined or ridiculed. • Your people feel that they are recognised for their contribution.
  13. 13. Watch leadership expert Amy Edmondson talk about psychological safety and why it matters. Click here to play.
  14. 14. Creating a Psychologically Safe Workplace Psychological safety is an important component of developing workplace health and wellbeing and the benefits it can bring. If your organisation wants to proactively work towards and sustain a psychologically safe working environment, why not consider some of the following top tips.
  15. 15. Be Inclusive Trust builds psychological safety, so making sure that everyone feels included and important is key. Seek feedback, encourage colleagues to get involved and ensure they feel confident to speak up and contribute. Diminishing or not seeking a colleague’s input could leave them feeling unsafe to offer it in the future, losing out on different perspectives and opportunities for problem-solving or innovation. Everyone has different skills sets, talents and experience. Use them by encouraging everyone to have their say.
  16. 16. Be Curious Make questions count and encourage inquisitiveness in teams. Make sure people feel comfortable and confident in asking theirs and don’t feel like they shouldn’t (or wish they hadn’t!). If things go wrong – a project goes awry, a non-compliance revealed, results not as expected – see it as another opportunity to be curious and learn. It helps to build trust, develop team working, trouble shoot and ultimately support wellbeing and organisational performance.
  17. 17. Be Supportive Knowing that they are part of a supportive team and organisation will mean that your employees will feel more confident and able to come forward should they be experiencing issues that are impacting their life and work. Early awareness and intervention where appropriate – from flexible working and redesigning workload through to health related support – can boost resilience for the individuals concerned and also lessen any prolonged or negative impact for them, their colleagues and the productivity of the organisation as a whole.
  18. 18. Further support from IDG • We want to help your organisation be happier, healthier and more sustainable. If you’d like to talk to us about your approach to health and wellbeing, please get in touch or find out more about our workplace wellbeing support here. • A first step in creating psychological safety is to understand how ‘safe’ your employees currently are. Designed to support this activity, Wellbeing Insights (Wbi) is a predictive, online workplace wellbeing tool that analyses and identifies wellbeing issues. You can find out more about it here. • To find out more about IDG and what we’re all about, visit our website www.i- dg.co.uk, call us on 0844 406 8008* or email enquiries@i-dg.co.uk * Calls will cost 3p per minute plus your phone company's access charge

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