Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.





















Objectives
By the end of this activity, each student will:
• be introduced to delive...






















Objectives
By the end of this activity, each student will:
• deliver or participate ...
























Objectives
By the end of this activity, each student will:
• be introduced ...
المناظرة
المناظرة
المناظرة
المناظرة
المناظرة
المناظرة
المناظرة
المناظرة
المناظرة
المناظرة
المناظرة
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

المناظرة

363 views

Published on

Debate basics

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

المناظرة

  1. 1.                  Objectives By the end of this activity, each student will: • be introduced to delivering speeches in front of the class. • be introduced to using a clear structure to organize ideas. • get to know one another. Time Allotment 30 minutes Method Assign each student in the class a partner. Allow 6-7 minutes to interview one another. Students should ask one another about favorite foods, family members, hobbies, interests, personal history, etc. Each student should take notes on the partner’s responses to their questions. After each student has had a chance to both ask and answer questions, bring the class back together. Allow students 1-2 minutes to prepare a 30-second speech introducing their partner to the class. Encourage them to focus on four key things they would like to communicate about their partner and to clearly separate them in their speech. Each student should say “The first important thing about [student X] are her hobbies. Her hobbies are…..The second important thing about [student X] is….”
  2. 2.                 Objectives By the end of this activity, each student will: • deliver or participate in the preparation of one impromptu speech. • be introduced to basic argumentation and persuasive speaking skills. Time Allotment One class period (or more). Materials and Preparation Create a short description of role-playing scenario related to the topic to hand out to each student. For example, a role-playing debate scenario might be a public forum in which community groups discuss the need to end racial profiling in the local police department. The description should clearly state the issue at hand and offer some context about the issue. Decide on a format for the activity, including speech times and opportunities for floor speeches and questioning. Create role descriptions to hand out to students in the class. Each student should have an individual role, but some students will have a role of their own (i.e. the mayor) and some students will hav the same role as a few other students (i.e. members of community group x). Method Pass out a description of the scenario and read it aloud to the class. Then, hand out the role descriptions randomly to the students. Students with the same role should work together in groups to develop a 2-3 minute speech on the issue at hand, and select a spokesperson to present it to the class. Students who have a unique roles should work independently to develop a speech. Allow 5-10 minutes for students to prepare their speeches. Instruct students to develop speeches that reflect the perspectives and interests of the role students have been assigned. After the preparation time has elapsed, begin the public debate. The teacher, or a designated student, should preside over the role-play debate, recognize speakers, and maintain order. Each representative should deliver a speech. After each speech, give the class 1 minute to question the speaker. After each representative has spoken, you may want to open the debate to additional floor speeches, or give each group a chance to give closing remarks. To conclude the activity, you can have a vote by a show of hands on the issue. After the vote, have a class discussion about what happened in the scenario, including a discussion of what interests were at work and what types of arguments were most persuasive to what interest groups. Variations:. You can increase the rigor of this activity by giving out roles and advance and requiring that students research the positions they take and prepare formal presentations.
  3. 3.                        Objectives By the end of this activity, each student will: • be introduced to recording debate arguments in the format of a flow. • be introduced to responding to individual arguments in a structured and understandable way. Time Allotment 10 minutes. Can be extended by repeating the activity with different student speakers. Method Ask two students to sit face to face in desks at the front of the classroom. Ask the rest of the students to take out a piece of paper and pen in order to flow the debate they are about to observe. Each student should divide their paper into three columns in order to flow the debate. You may wish to flow the debate on the board as well to demonstrate to students the basic technique of flowing. The first student at the front of the class should make a simple, controversial statement (e.g. “Ice cream is healthy”). The students in the class should write this statement in the first column of their paper. The second student should come up with 3 or 4 arguments against the proposal and deliver them with clear distinction between the arguments “My first argument is…, My second argument is…, My third argument is…..) The students in the class should write each of these points, in order, one beneath the other, in the second column of their paper. The original speaker should answer each of the second speaker’s arguments one by one. The original speaker should reference her opponent’s arguments and then offer at least two responses. For example: “Her first argument is… One. [Speaker’s first response] Two. [Speaker’s second response] Her second argument is… One [Speaker’s first response] Two [Speaker’s second response].” The students in the class should write the original speaker’s responses in the third column of their paper next to each of the second speaker’s arguments.

×