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Northeast Wireless Safety Summit February 4, 2015 Presentations

Northeast Wireless Safety Summit (NEWSS), founded by HPC Wireless, hosted the first annual Wireless Safety Summit in Tarrytown, NY on February 4, 2015. The panel of presenters delivered these slides during the full day program.

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Northeast Wireless Safety Summit February 4, 2015 Presentations

  1. 1. Welcome   February  4,  2015   Tarrytown,  NY  
  2. 2. Northeast  Wireless  Safety  Summit   February  4,  2015   #NEWSS     #NEWSS          2   Hubble  Founda?on       hAp://www.hubblefounda?on.org/     BridgeAe  Hester   Founder  and  President     PRESENTER  
  3. 3. Northeast  Wireless  Safety  Summit   February  4,  2015   #NEWSS     #NEWSS          3   Legal  Panel  Discussion     MODERATOR:     Douglas  JarreF     PANELISTS:     David  Sarvardi     Manesh  Rath    
  4. 4. Communication Towers and Fall Protection Requirements John Frowd, US Dept. of Labor-OSHA Manhattan Area Office Frowd.john@dol.gov GENERAL INDUSTRY
  5. 5. http://www.osha.gov/doc/topics/ communicationtower/index.html
  6. 6. In 2013, OSHA recorded a total number of 13 communication tower-related fatalities. In the beginning weeks of 2014, there were four (4) fatalities at communication tower worksites. This represents a significant increase in fatalities and injuries from previous years, and OSHA is concerned at this trend. This is more worker deaths than in the previous two years combined.
  7. 7. Monopole Self Supporting Guyed 100-200 feet tall 100-400 feet tall 100-2,150 feet tall Tower Types
  8. 8. Tower Hazards: ■Falls from great heights ■Electrical hazards ■Hazards associated with hoisting personnel and equipment with base- mounted drum hoists ■Inclement weather ■Falling object hazards ■Equipment failure ■Structural collapse of towers
  9. 9. Standards 5(a) 1 (ANSI 222g & 1019) Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926) ■1926 Subpart M, Fall protection ◦1926.501, Duty to have fall protection ◦1926.502, Fall protection systems criteria and practices ◦1926.503, Training requirements ■1926 Subpart E - Personal Protective and Life Saving Equipment ◦1926.104 - Safety belts, lifelines, and lanyards. ◦1926.105 - Safety nets. 1926. 1431 - Hoisting Personnel General Industry (29 CFR 1910) ■1910 Subpart R - Special Industries ◦1910.268 - Telecommunications. ■1910 Subpart I - Personal Protective Equipment ◦1910.132 - General requirements.
  10. 10. Fall Protection … Fall protection during climbing is necessary part of fall safety. However, climbers sometimes faced with climbing in areas with inadequate anchorage points (typically during antenna climbing). In these cases, first man up carries and attaches safety rope for use during time of work performance. Fall protection rope removed when all work completed.
  11. 11. Fall Prevention … Though free climbing not authorized, not all antenna manufacturers presently have ways to provide fall protection that meets minimum anchorage requirements.
  12. 12. First man up attaches safety line. Once attached, all others can attach to it. Depending upon the number of personnel on the antenna, more than one rope may be
  13. 13. The use of portable type anchorage points can make difficult attachment locations safe. Cross arms shown here are one such means.
  14. 14. Climber is attached with fall protection lanyard and positioning device.
  15. 15. Climber is using a cross arm anchorage point to allow him to work in an area that does not have an adequate anchorage point.
  16. 16. Climber is transferring from one anchorage point to another.
  17. 17. Fatal & Serious Accidents
  18. 18. Alpha Antenna Services, Utica, NY (10/25/2010) •  379 Foot Communication
  19. 19. Alpha Antenna Services, Inc. Violations •  Cit. 1 Item 1 – 5a1 – Personnel hoist deficiencies •  Cit. 1 Item 2 -1926.95 (a)- Damaged fall protection lanyards •  Cit. 1 Item 3 - 1926.100(a) – No head protection •  Cit. 1 Item 4 - 1926.1051(a) – First step on tower 54 inches above the ground
  20. 20. Patriot Towers, Inc., Marcy, NY (04/27/2012) •  170 Foot Monopole Communication Tower
  21. 21. Patriot Towers, Inc., Violations •  Cit. 1 Item 1a -1926.1053 (a)(22)(i) – Ladder safety device not drop tested . •  Cit. 1 Item 1b – 1926.1053(a)(22)(iii) – Ladder safety device did not activate. •  Cit. Item 2a – 1926.1053(b)(15) – Ladder safety device cable was not inspected for tension. •  Cit. 1 Item 2b - Serious 1926.1060 (a)(1) (ii) – Lack of training on fall protection system.
  22. 22. NAICS Code: 237130 Power and Communication Line and Related Structures Top Ten Violations
  23. 23. #1 -1926.453(b)(2)(v) Aerial Lifts
  24. 24. #2-1926.105(a) Free Climbing
  25. 25. #3 - 5(a)(1) General Duty Clause •  Hoisting employees to the work station 1.  Drum hoist deficiencies 2.  Lack Anti-two blocking 3.  Wire rope deficiencies 4.  Rigging deficiencies 5.  Trial Lift & proof testing 6.  Lack of Training
  26. 26. #4-1926.1060(a) Ladder Safety Devices Training
  27. 27. #5 – 1926.100(a) Head Protection
  28. 28. #6-1926.95 (a)- damaged fall protection equipment
  29. 29. #7 – 1926.59(e)(1) Hazard Communication Ø Chemical Inventory Ø Safety Data Sheets Ø Container Labeling Ø Employee Training
  30. 30. #8 – 1910.178(l)(i) Powered industrial truck training
  31. 31. #9 – 1926.251 Rigging Equipment Ø Alloy steel chain slings Ø Wire rope slings Ø Web slings
  32. 32. Questions
  33. 33. Northeast  Wireless  Safety  Summit   February  4,  2015   #NEWSS     #NEWSS          41   Morning  Keynote:  Wireless  Industry  Challenges  and  Safety   Solu?ons   PRESENTOR:     TODD  SCHLEKEWAY      
  34. 34. Wireless Industry Challenges and Safety Solutions Northeast Wireless Safety Summit Tarrytown, New York February 4, 2015
  35. 35. National Association of Tower Erectors q  Experienced  in  establishing   industry  best  prac?ces  for   safety  since  1995;   q  Voice  of  tower  construc?on,   service  and  maintenance   industry;  and   q  Industry  leader  in  tower   safety  through  educa?on,   standards  and   professionalism.   About  NATE  
  36. 36. The Wireless Industry & NATE “I  have  deep  admira?on  for   the  work  that  the  tower   construc?on  and  maintenance   industry  does  with  the  wireless   communica?ons  industry.  It  is   indispensable,  valuable  and   the  features  that  you  add  to   the  wireless  service…there   would  be  no  wireless  service   without  what  you  do.”   Steve  Largent  (Former  President  &  CEO  of   CTIA-­‐The  Wireless  Associa@on)  
  37. 37.                  The Wireless Industry & NATE   “People  don’t  realize  how   important  these  tower   construc?on  businesses     are  to  the  world”     Dr.  Mar@n  Cooper   (Inventor  of  the  Cell  Phone)  
  38. 38. Industry Challenges q  Cyclical  Workforce   q  Fragmented  Training     q  Pre-­‐Hiring  Prac?ces:  The  Hiring  of   Unqualified  Contractors   q  Addi?onal  “Stresses/Loads”   Placed  on  Tower  Structures   q  Fall  Protec?on  Viola?ons   q  Hard  Market  for  Workers  Comp   Insurance    
  39. 39. Question?     How  many  tower  technicians  are   currently  working  in  the  industry?          Es?mates  range  from  10,000  –  14,000   tower  techs  currently  working  in  the   industry.  
  40. 40. Building Your Network: Elements of Construction Price   Quality   Schedule   q Price   q Quality     q Schedule  
  41. 41. Who Would You Hire?
  42. 42. Responsibility to Hire a Qualified Contractor There  is  a  direct  correla?on  between  safety  and  quality!     Your  network  will  probably  end  up     resembling  your  contractor!  
  43. 43. Building Your Network: The Perils of Compromise
  44. 44. Improper LTE Installations q  Missing  hangers   q  Poor  line  rou?ng   q  Junc?on  box  blocked   q  Poor  line  support   q  Stress  on  the  jumper  
  45. 45. Overloading of New & Existing Antenna Mounts   ¨  The  overloading  of  new  and   exis?ng  antenna  mounts  has   many  in  the  industry   concerned.   ¨  Moderniza?on  from  3G  to  4G   or  LTE,  and  beyond,  can   significantly  increase  the   weight  and  Effec?ve   Projected  Area  (or  windload)   of  the  equipment    
  46. 46. 3G vs LTE Loading Differential   ¨  Twelve  8’x1’  Panel   Antennas   ¨  Twelve  TMA’s  and  six  RRUs   ¨  EPA  of  177.7  Square  Feet   Typical  3G  Load   Typical  LTE  Load   q  Twelve  6’x1’  Panel   Antennas   q  EPA  of  78.6  Square  Feet   *  Courtesy  of  Valmont  Site  Pro  1      
  47. 47. 3G Load vs LTE Load   3G  Load   LTE  Load   %  Increase   150'  POLE   19,677  lbs   24,838  lbs   26%   250'  TOWER   34,700  lbs   42,300  lbs   22%   *  Courtesy  of  Valmont  Site  Pro  1  
  48. 48. OSHA Region 5 Case Study Fall Protection Challenges   q  OSHA  examined  32  industry   specific  fatali?es  over  a  5  year   period  from  2007-­‐2012     q  25  were  related  to  falls     q  5  were  related  to  tower  and/ or  gin  pole  collapse   * Source:  Bill  Donovan  and  Howie  Eberts  (OSHA-­‐Region  5)          February  19,  2013  at  NATE  Conference  &  Exposi?on  
  49. 49. Insurance Market q  A  Hard  Insurance  Market     The  current  hard  market  is  driving   pricing  up  for  all  tower  service   companies.  This  is  because  of  poor   underwri?ng  results  and  lack  of   investment  income.     q  Fewer  Workers’  Compensa?on   Insurance  Carriers     There  are  only  a  few  insurance   companies  willing  to  write  workers’   compensa?on  policies  for  tower   companies.     *  Courtesy  of  Bruce  Eades  (Insurance  Office  of  America)  
  50. 50. Safety Solutions q  Qualified  Contractor  Veung   q  Wireless  Industry  Safety  Task  Force         q  Na?onal  Wireless  Skills-­‐Based   Training  Standard     q  OSHA  Rela?ons  Outreach     q  Safety  Programs  and  Resources    
  51. 51. Hiring Qualified Contractors You Make the Choice Hiring  a  Qualified   Contractor  =   Commitment  to  Safety   &  Quality  
  52. 52. Qualified Contractor Selection q  Years  in  Business/Reputa?on/Reference  Checks   q  Safety  Record   q  OSHA  300  Logs   q  Insurance  Coverage   q  Insurance  EMR  Rate   q  Member  of  NATE/STAR  Ini?a?ve  Program/Safety  Audits   q  Training  Program/Documenta?on   q  Financial  Stability   q  Third  Party  Safety  Screening   q  Self-­‐Perform  or  Subcontract  Work?   q  Internal  Drug  Screening  Program  
  53. 53. Impact of Safety & Quality INPUT   ¨  Time   ¨  Effort   ¨  Money   ¨  Loss  of  freedom   OUTPUT  of  SAFETY   ¨  Health  and  well  being   ¨  Employee  morale   ¨  Limit  liability     OUTPUT  OF  QUALITY   ¨  BeAer  performance   ¨  Longer  las?ng   ¨  Less  Maintenance   Start Finish Time Effort Money
  54. 54. Wireless Industry Safety Task Force Mission  Statement   To  collaborate  on  best   prac?ce  solu?ons  to   achieve  sustainable   safety  and  quality   improvements  in  the   industry.    
  55. 55. Wireless Industry Safety Task Force
  56. 56. National Wireless Skills-Based Training Standard   FoundaZonal  Worker  Categories     1)  Helper/Ground  Worker   2)  Ground  Technician   3)  Telecommunica?ons  Tower  Tech  I   4)  Telecommunica?ons  Tower  Tech  II   5)  Lead/Foreman          
  57. 57. National Wireless Skills-Based Training Standard   Specialized  Foreman  Tracks  Under   Development     1)  Antenna  &  Line  Foreman   2)  Tower  (Stacking)  Construc?on  Foreman   3)  Structural  Modifica?ons  Foreman      
  58. 58. Manufacturing and Engineering Solutions Working Group Mission  Statement     Engage  with  industry   manufacturers  and  engineers   to  discuss  what   advancements  can  be  made   to  fall  protec?on  equipment   and  tower  structures.  
  59. 59. OSHA Relations Washington, D.C.
  60. 60. Industry Leaders Authorized Climber Training Event  
  61. 61. Safety Programs and Resources
  62. 62.        What Have Been Your Challenges?
  63. 63. How Have You Found Success?  
  64. 64. Conclusions q  The  en?re  wireless  industry  “ecosystem”   from  carriers,  tower  owners,  contractors,   subcontractors  and  individual  tower   technicians  are  responsible  for  safety     q  There  is  a  direct  correla?on  between  safety   and  quality     q  A  culture  of  safety  must  be  established  within   each  organiza?on  and  it  starts  at  the  top     q  A  commitment  to  safety  must  occur  on  a   daily  basis     q  Safety  can  solve  many  of  the  industry’s   current  challenges  
  65. 65. Thank You!
  66. 66. Northeast  Wireless  Safety  Summit   February  4,  2015   #NEWSS     #NEWSS          74   Thank  You  to  Our  Lunch  Sponsor!  
  67. 67. Economic  Impact  of  Wireless     In  NYS   Results  as  of  June  2014  
  68. 68. Economic  Impact  of  Wireless  in  NYS   The  Backstory   Wireless:  Direct  Contributor,   Catalyst  for  New  Markets     Economic  Impact  of  Wireless  in  NYS   June  2014  
  69. 69. Direct  Impacts   Ê  In  NY  there  were  21  million  wireless  subscribers  in  2012  –  near  4   times  the  5.4  million  in  2000.   Ê  Total  employment  for  the  wireless  sector  in  NYS  is  estimated  at   60,000  with  a  combined  payroll  of  $5.1  billion.   Ê  Public  investment  since  2008  (including  state  and  federal  funding)   totals  at  least  $520  million,  while  annual  private  investment  from   cell  tower  leasing  and  wireless  carriers  exceeds  $1.6  billion.   Ê  The  wireless  industry  is  responsible  for  nearly  $2.4  billion  in  taxes  to   NYS  and  local  governments.    
  70. 70. Future  Shock   Ê  Smart  devices  use  29  times  as  much  data  as  non-­‐smart   devices,  and  77%  of  new  devices  nationwide  were  smart  in   2013.   Ê  By  2018  Cisco  forecasts  that  global  data  demand  will  be  10-­‐ times  2013  levels.     Ê  Information  Age  Economics  (IAE)  speculates  that  the  GDP   impact  will  be  $1.2  trillion  by  2017  and  be  associated  with  1.2   million  jobs.    
  71. 71. Wireless  Industry:   Current  Trends   As  capacity  has  expanded  and   technology  has  reduced  costs,  prices   have  fallen  dramatically.      
  72. 72. Wireless  Industry:   Current  Trends   In  2013,  38%  of  adults  lived  in   households  that  relied  exclusively  on   wireless  telephony.  Just  over  2%  of   households  have  no  telephone   service  at  all.     ~  National  Health  Interview  Survey  by  the  CDC    
  73. 73. Access  to  Wireless   Service   According  to  the  NYS  Broadband   Mapping  initiative,  about  5%  of   households  statewide  lack  access  to   broadband  service.    
  74. 74. About  NYSWA   Ê  Membership  –  It’s  Free!   Join  at  www.nyswa.org     Ê  Wireless  Forum  2015  –  It’s   going  to  be  BIG!     Ê  Multiple  Networking  &   Educational  Opportunities/ Events  Throughout  the   Year…   Ê  Join  us  tonight  at  for  the   Network  for  the  Network   event  after  this  conference   at  RiverMarket  Bar  &   Kitchen  @  6  p.m.    
  75. 75. Thank  You   Questions?  
  76. 76. Northeast  Wireless  Safety  Summit   February  4,  2015   #NEWSS     #NEWSS          84   Awernoon  Keynote   PRESENTOR:     John  Keaveney    
  77. 77. Redu ce Risk Redu ce Injury Redu ce Cost Increa se Profit
  78. 78. FACT
  79. 79. •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 
  80. 80. •  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 
  81. 81. —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  — 
  82. 82. •  • 
  83. 83. —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  — 
  84. 84. •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 
  85. 85. —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  — 
  86. 86. •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 
  87. 87. —  —  —  —  —  N o .   Item   Annual   Qua   Mont h   Bi- Weekly   Wee k   Comments   1 Safety Audit   120   30   10   5   2   Based upon total crew count. Both internal and subcontractors. Goal, 1 audit, per crew, per quarter   2 Total Company Training Hours   2500   625   208   96   48       3 Accidents-Days Away   0   0   0   0   0       4 JSA's   2340   585   195   90   45   Based upon how many internal crews HPC is running on a given week.   5 Weekly Vehicle Inspections   728   182   61   28   14   Based on how many company vehicles we have in the Fleet. Currently 14   6 Safety Comment Cards (SBO'S)   1500   375   125   58   29   Based on how many per crew (preferably one per person per week)   7 In person training with each office   16   4   1   1   0   One per Office per Year   8 Unannounced Safety Site Inspections   48   12   4   2   1   To be coordinated with Area Managers   9 DOT Daily Log's   5824   1456   485   224   112   Based on how many active drivers we have driving company vehicles that could be over 10,000 lbs. combined weight. Currently 16   1 0 DOT Daily Vehicle Inspection   2860   715   238   110   55   Based on how many company vehicles we have in the Fleet, driven daily and could be over 10,000 lbs. combined weight. Currently 11  
  88. 88. —  —  —  —  — 
  89. 89. •  •  •  •  •  •  • 
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  91. 91. •  •  •  • 
  92. 92. •  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 
  93. 93. •  •  • 
  94. 94. ACTUAL •  18 •  30 •  17 •  18 •  5 88% SINGLE BALANCED SAFETY PERFORMANCE SCORE = 88%
  95. 95. —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  —  — 
  96. 96. •  •  •  •  •  •  • 
  97. 97. Tower Fatalities 2004 – 2014 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Tower Fatalities
  98. 98. —  —  —  —  —  —  —  — 
  99. 99. JKEAVENEY@NORTHRIVERINTEGRATED.COM WWW.NORTHRIVERINTEGRATED.COM
  100. 100. Northeast  Wireless  Safety  Summit   February  4,  2015   #NEWSS     #NEWSS          112   Site  Safety  Applica?ons   PRESENTOR:     James  McDonough   SeeForge      
  101. 101. Increase profits, lower risk, make smarter decisions Automate your operations with SEE Forge FatFinger™ app www.seeforge.com | Houston, USA +1 832 691 7277
  102. 102. www.seeforge.com | San Francisco, USA +1 415 613 6513 | Perth, Australia +61 8 6555 8072 Todays Overview 1.  SEE Forge – How we add value 2.  Case study – Oil & Gas 3.  Innovations – What we are working on 4.  Changes in the software industry – SaaS
  103. 103. Empower your team closest to where profit is created Operations have a huge impact to profit and the reputation of the company Front Line Supervisor C-Level www.seeforge.com | Houston, USA +1 832 691 7277
  104. 104. www.seeforge.com | San Francisco, USA +1 415 613 6513 | Perth, Australia +61 8 6555 8072 Compare the Workflows Your current process One app = One source of information
  105. 105. The massive problem You spend millions on people & technology but still operate on paper & excel www.seeforge.com | Houston, USA +1 832 691 7277 Employees hate filling out paperwork Executives are blind to critical operational information Legacy systems are clunky and slow to be populated with poor data
  106. 106. www.seeforge.com | San Francisco, USA +1 415 613 6513 | Perth, Australia +61 8 6555 8072 Critical processes at risk Your accounting, sales and HR systems don't cover vital parts of operations
  107. 107. www.seeforge.com | Houston, USA +1 832 691 7277 Operators interact with an average of 17 different processes everyday •  Tool Box Meeting •  Shift handover doc •  Task allocation & job planning •  Job Safety Analysis (JSA) •  Safety Observation •  Work instructions •  Standard Operation Procedure (SOP) review •  Production/Quality/Plant round •  Maintenance request •  Lock/Tag out •  Post job quality checklist •  Startup checklist •  Daily diary / production log •  Consumable usage •  Shift handover doc •  LEAN metrics update •  Timesheet Monthly   Yearly   •  Contractor audit •  Site specific training •  Competency audit •  Equipment inspection •  Incident investigation •  Asset / Inventory audit •  Environmental audit
  108. 108. All your field processes on one FAT FINGER™ app Our clients' paperwork. Painful. into one easy place. www.seeforge.com | Houston, USA +1 832 691 7277
  109. 109. www.seeforge.com | San Francisco, USA +1 415 613 6513 | Perth, Australia +61 8 6555 8072 We make it remarkably easy to collect, report & manage information Any process. Any device. Any time. Employees need easy Executives need insights
  110. 110. FatFinger™ easy to use app for the technology challenged www.seeforge.com | Houston, USA +1 832 691 7277
  111. 111. www.seeforge.com | San Francisco, USA +1 415 613 6513 | Perth, Australia +61 8 6555 8072 Real-time insights to your operations & your KPIs Cloud based Command Centre – Stay on top of what matters most
  112. 112. GPS reporting to identify risk and optimization opportunities Cloud based Command Centre: Real time reporting plotted on map using GPS location. www.seeforge.com | Houston, USA +1 832 691 7277
  113. 113. www.seeforge.com | San Francisco, USA +1 415 613 6513 | Perth, Australia +61 8 6555 8072 Answering vital operational questions… Where is my risk? E.g. Serious fall injury 5 min ago in Texas. North building, 10th floor. Who is my best & worst employee? E.g. Bob never completes his projects status reports. What are we showing our customers? E.g. Forward professional PDFs to your customers from the field.
  114. 114. Client case study Energy www.seeforge.com | Houston, USA +1 832 691 7277
  115. 115. www.seeforge.com | San Francisco, USA +1 415 613 6513 | Perth, Australia +61 8 6555 8072 Case study: Results 12,675 FTE days = $14.4 Million Saved Client's current process Process with SEE Forge ~120 min to complete ~3 min to complete Data: 52,000 hazards/yr, 117min saved, $220K FTE cost, 8hr man-days.
  116. 116. Capturing information costs serious $ As reporting increases so does the cost. Best have an efficient process. www.seeforge.com | Houston, USA +1 832 691 7277 | Perth, Australia +61 8 6555 8072
  117. 117. www.seeforge.com | San Francisco, USA +1 415 613 6513 | Perth, Australia +61 8 6555 8072 Sneak peak to SEE Forge innovations ü  Automated Manager ü  Operational Parameters & Datawash
  118. 118. www.seeforge.com | San Francisco, USA +1 415 613 6513 | Perth, Australia +61 8 6555 8072 The software industry has changed SaaS – Software as a Service 1.  Lower initial costs – No large up front license fees 2.  Rapid implementation – Days not years 3.  Instant upgrades – Access to innovation 4.  Not locked into long term deals – Only stay with value adding services 5.  Seamless integration – Easily integrate to boost value of existing systems
  119. 119. www.seeforge.com | Houston, USA +1 832 691 7277 James McDonough Co-founder & CEO Houston office: 832 691 7277 james@seeforge.com www.seeforge.com
  120. 120. Plug-in & populate current systems with perfect real-time data Common frontend for all complex systems Users don’t need to worry that backend systems are changing Plug in your current systems Pass data to where it needs to go • Easy • No Training required • One app for everything www.seeforge.com | Houston, USA +1 832 691 7277
  121. 121. www.seeforge.com | San Francisco, USA +1 415 613 6513 | Perth, Australia +61 8 6555 8072 Intrinsically safe cases iPhones, iPads, Windows Mobile, Samsung Galaxy Note.
  122. 122. Northeast  Wireless  Safety  Summit   February  4,  2015   #NEWSS     #NEWSS          134   Fall  Preven?on  Standard   PRESENTOR:     Paul  Colangelo    
  123. 123. ANSI  Z359  Fall  PrevenZon  Code:   Fundamentals  for  an  EffecZve   Management  Program     Paul  J.  Colangelo,  STS,  CHST,  CET   Na?onal  Director  of  Compliance  Programs   Paul.Colangelo@clicksafety.com    
  124. 124.       •  Industry  StaZsZcs   •  Common  Fall   Hazards     •  RegulaZons  &   Standards   •  EffecZve  Program   Elements   •  Your  Training  Culture   •  Where  to  get  Help               AGENDA
  125. 125. Industry Fall Statistics FALL  STATISTICS     •  Falls are among the leading causes of fatalities and injuries across all industries such as construction, manufacturing, marine, agriculture and mining •  Falls are the leading cause of fatalities in the construction industry. In   2010,  there  were  264  fall  fatali?es  (255  falls  to  lower  level)  out  of  774  total   fatali?es  in  construc?on.   •  Falls accounted for over 300 fatalities in construction in 2012   •  Alarming increase of fall incidents during construction and maintenance of communication towers- 11 recorded fatalities in 2014 (OSHA) •  The average workers’ comp claim in all industrial classifications stemming from falls from elevations is 50k. •  OSHA fines and violations- Serious (7k) up to Willful/Repeat (70k)
  126. 126. Leadership Quotes     “In  the  effort  to  prevent  fall  fatali?es  and  injuries,  we   encourage  employers  to  par?cipate  in  OSHA’s  Plan,   Provide  and  Train  ini?a?ve”   -­‐  Thomas  E.  Perez   Secretary  of  Labor   Occupa?onal  Safety  and  Health  Administra?on  
  127. 127. Leadership Quotes              -­‐  President  Barack  Obama     "Falls  account  for  more  than  a  third  of  all  deaths  in  this   industry.  We're  working  with  employers,  workers,  industry   groups,  state  OSH  plans,  and  civic  and  faith-­‐based   organiza?ons  to  host  safety  stand-­‐downs  that  focus  on   recognizing  hazards  and  preven?ng  falls.  We  are  geung  the   message  out  to  America's  employers  that  safety  pays  and   falls  cost.“   -­‐  Dr.  David  Michaels,  Assistant  Secretary  of  Labor     Occupa?onal  Safety  and  Health  Administra?on    
  128. 128. PHYSICS OF A FALL Elapsed Time Distan ce Travel ed Speed MPH Force at Impact 0.25 1ft 5.5 400lbs 0.50 4ft 11 1600lbs 0.75 9ft 16 3600lbs 1.00 16ft 22 6400lbs 1.25 25ft 27 10,000lbs 1.50 36ft 33 14,000lbs 1.75 49ft 38 19,600lbsCalculaZons  based  on  180lb  worker  carrying  20lbs  of  tools  
  129. 129. •  LADDERS   •  SCAFFOLDS   •  STAIRWAYS     •  RAMPS,  RUNWAYS  &   WALKWAYS   •  PLATFORMS   •  ROOFTOPS   •  STRUCTURES   •  MOBILE  EQUIPMENT   •  HOLES/SKYLIGHTS   •  TRENCHES  &   EXCAVATIONS   •  4’,  5’,  6’,  10’,  15’,  25’,   30’  fall  trigger  height   rules     Common  Fall  Hazards  
  130. 130. STRUCTURES •  Towers •  Tanks •  Poles •  Common for utilizing positioning systems and PFAS •  https://www.osha.gov/ doc/topics/ communicationtower/ index.html
  131. 131. ELECTRICAL  CONTACT   HAZARD   •  Awareness of required or incidental contact with live electricity must be incorporated into fall prevention training! •  Many fatalities and severe injuries stemming from contact with live electricity result from falls after contact •  Maintain a 10’ clearance from electrical hazards unless source de- energization is verified   +   =  
  132. 132.       FALL REGULATIONS & STANDARDS OCCUPATIONAL  SAFETY  &  HEALTH  ADMINSTRATION  (OSHA)   CODE  OF  FEDERAL  REGULATIONS  (CFR)     1910  (General  Industry)   Subpart  D  -­‐  Walking-­‐Working  Surfaces   •  General  requirements   •  Guarding  floor  and  wall  openings  and  holes   •  Fixed  industrial  stairs   •  Portable  wood  ladders   •  Portable  metal  ladders   •  Fixed  ladders   •  Safety  requirements  for  scaffolding   •  Manually  propelled  mobile  ladder  stands  and  scaffolds  (towers)   •  Other  working  surfaces   Subpart  F  -­‐  Powered  Plaoorms,  Man  Lips,  and  Vehicle-­‐Mounted  Work   Plaoorms   Subpart  I-­‐  Personal  ProtecZve  Equipment   •  Personal  Fall  Arrest  Systems   •  Posi?oning  Device  Systems   Subpart  R-­‐  Special  Industries   •  Telecommunica?ons-­‐  1910.268   •  Electric  Power  Genera?on,  Transmission,  and  Distribu?on-­‐  1910.269                    
  133. 133.       FALL REGULATIONS & STANDARDS OCCUPATIONAL  SAFETY  &  HEALTH  ADMINSTRATION  (OSHA)   CODE  OF  FEDERAL  REGULATIONS  (CFR)     1926  (ConstrucZon)  -­‐  Subpart  M-­‐  Fall  ProtecZon-­‐  Applies  to:   •  "Unprotected  sides  and  edges”-­‐  6’  or  more  above  a  lower  level.     •  "Leading  edges."   •   "Hoist  areas."   •   "Holes."   •   "Formwork  and  reinforcing  steel."   •  "Ramps,  runways,  and  other  walkways."   •  "Excava?ons/Trenches."   •   "Dangerous  equipment."   •  "Overhand  bricklaying  and  related  work.“   •  "Roofing  work  on  Low-­‐slope  roofs."   •  "Steep  roofs."   •  "Precast  concrete  erec?on."   •   "Residen?al  construc?on."   •  "Wall  openings."     •  "Walking/working  surfaces  not  otherwise  addressed."                
  134. 134.       FALL REGULATIONS & STANDARDS OCCUPATIONAL  SAFETY  &  HEALTH  ADMINSTRATION  (OSHA)   CODE  OF  FEDERAL  REGULATIONS  (CFR)     1926  (ConstrucZon)  -­‐  Subpart  M-­‐  Fall  ProtecZon-­‐  Does  Not  Apply  to:   •  Scaffolds - Subpart L- •  Certain derricks and cranes- Subpart N •  Steel Erection- Subpart R- •  Certain tunneling operations- Subpart S •  Electric distribution lines- Subpart V •  Ladders and stairs- Subpart X •  Also consult OSHA Letters of Interpretation sections •  Remember: Regulations are the minimum requirements!          
  135. 135.       FALL REGULATIONS & STANDARDS   AMERICAN  NATIONAL  STANDARDS  INSTITUTE  (ANSI)     Z359  FALL  PROTECTION  CODE     •  First  published  1992,  revisions/addi?ons  in  1999,   2007,  2009,  2012,  2013   •  Umbrella  of  17  standards  that  mainly  address  the   variety  of  equipment  developed  for  fall  protec?on   •  Original  standard  applied  to  fall  arrest  equipment   used  in  General  Industry  and  non-­‐construc?on   occupa?ons.     •  Construc1on  Industry  has  its  own  set  of  standards,   ANSI  A10.32-­‐2004.  
  136. 136.       FALL REGULATIONS & STANDARDS AMERICAN  NATIONAL  STANDARDS  INSTITUTE  (ANSI)     Z359  FALL  PROTECTION  CODE   Established  Standards:     Z359.0-­‐2012-­‐  Defini1ons  and  Nomenclature.  Used  for  Fall  Protec?on  and  Fall  Arrest  Establishes  the   defini?ons  and  nomenclature  used  for  the  Z359  Fall  Protec?on  Code.       Z359.1-­‐2007-­‐  Safety  Requirements  for  Personal  Fall  Arrest  Systems,  Subsystems  and  Components.   Establishes  requirements  for  the  performance,  design.  marking,  qualifica?on,  instruc?on,  training,   inspec?on,  use,  maintenance  and  removal  from  service  of  personal  fall  arrest  systems.       Z359.2-­‐2007-­‐  Minimum  Requirements  for  a  Comprehensive  Managed  Fall  Protec1on  Program.   Establishes  guidelines  and  requirements  for  an  employer's  managed  fall  protec?on  program,  including   policies,  du?es  and  training,  fall  protec?on  procedures,  elimina?ng  and  controlling  fall  hazards,  rescue   procedures,  incident  inves?ga?ons  and  evalua?ng  program  effec?veness.       Z359.3-­‐2007-­‐  Safety  Requirements  for  Posi1oning  and  Travel  Restraint  Systems.  Establishes   requirements  for  the  performance,  design,  marking,  qualifica?on,  test  methods  and  instruc?ons  of   lanyards  and  harnesses  comprising  personal  posi?oning  and  travel  restraint  systems.       Z359.4-­‐2013-­‐  Safety  Requirements  for  Assisted-­‐Rescue  and  Self-­‐Rescue  Systems,  Subsystems  and   Components.  Establishes  requirements  for  the  performance,  design,  marking,  qualifica?on,   instruc?on,  training,  use,  maintenance  and  removal  from  service  of  connectors,  harnesses,  lanyards,   anchorage  connectors,  winches/hoists,  descent  control  devices,  rope  tackle  blocks  and  self-­‐retrac?ng   lanyards  with  integral  rescue  capability  comprising  rescue  systems  used  in  preplanned  self-­‐rescue  and   assisted-­‐rescue  applica?ons.        
  137. 137.       FALL REGULATIONS & STANDARDS AMERICAN  NATIONAL  STANDARDS  INSTITUTE  (ANSI)     Z359  FALL  PROTECTION  CODE   Established  Standards  ConZnued:     Z359.6-­‐2009-­‐  Specifica1ons  and  Design  Requirements  for  Ac1ve  Fall  Protec1on  Systems.  This  standard   is  intended  for  engineers  with  exper?se  in  designing  fall  protec?on  systems.  It  specifies  requirements  for   the  design  and  performance  of  complete  ac?ve  fall  protec?on  systems,  including  travel  restraint  and   ver?cal  and  horizontal  fall  arrest  systems.       Z359.7-­‐2011-­‐  Qualifica1on  and  Verifica1on  Tes1ng  of  Fall  Protec1on  Products.    Specifies  requirements   for  qualifica?on  and  verifica?on  tes?ng  of  Z359,  Fall  Protec?on  Code,  products.  It  includes  requirements   for  third-­‐party  tes?ng,  witness  tes?ng  and  manufacturer  tes?ng  of  fall  protec?on  products.       Z359.12-­‐2009-­‐  Connec1ng  Components  for  Personal  Fall  Arrest  Systems  (PFAS).  Establishes   requirements  for  the  performance,  design,  marking,  qualifica?on,  test  methods  and  removal  from   service  of  connectors.       Z359.13-­‐2013-­‐  Personal  Energy  Absorbers  and  Energy  Absorbing  Lanyards.  This  standard  establishes   requirements  for  the  performance,  design,  marking,  qualifica?on,  instruc?ons,  inspec?on,  maintenance   and  removal  from  service  of  energy  absorbing  lanyards  and  personal  energy  absorbers.       Z359.14-­‐2012-­‐  Safety  Requirements  for  Self-­‐Retrac1ng  Devices  for  Personal  Fall  Arrest  and  Rescue   Systems.  This  standard  establishes  requirements  for  the  performance,  design,  qualifica?on  tes?ng,   markings  and  instruc?ons,  inspec?ons,  maintenance  and  storage,  and  removal  from  service  of  self-­‐ retrac?ng  devices  (SRD's)  including  self-­‐retrac?ng  lanyards  (SRL's),  self-­‐retrac?ng  lanyards  with  integral   rescue  capability  (SRL-­‐R's),  and  self-­‐retrac?ng  lanyards  with  leading  edge  capability  (SRL-­‐LE's).  Reference   Standards  and  Documents:.          
  138. 138.       FALL REGULATIONS & STANDARDS AMERICAN  NATIONAL  STANDARDS  INSTITUTE  (ANSI)     Z359  FALL  PROTECTION  CODE   Forthcoming  Standards:     Z359.5-­‐  Safety  Requirements  for  Personal  Fall  Arrest  Systems     Z359.8-­‐  Managed  Fall  Protec?on  Programs     Z359.11-­‐  Safety  Requirements  for  Full-­‐Body  Harness  for  Personal  Fall  Arrest   System     Z359.15-­‐  Safety  Requirements  for  Ver?cal  Lifelines  for  Personal  Fall  Arrest   Systems     Z359.16-­‐  Safety  Requirements  for  Fall  Arresters  for  Personal  Fall  Arrest   Systems     Z359.17-­‐  Safety  Requirements  for  Horizontal  Lifelines  for  Personal  Fall  Arrest   Systems     Z359.18-­‐  Safety  Requirements  for  Anchorage  Connectors  for  Personal  Fall   Arrest  Systems     .    
  139. 139. EEFECTIVE  FALL   PROGRAM  ELEMENTS   ANSI  Z359.2-­‐2007  standard   Minimum  Requirements  for   a  Comprehensive  Managed   Fall  Protec1on  Program   ANSI  Z359.2-­‐2007  Program  elements:   •  Policies,  duZes,  and  training-­‐  Ensure  your  company  has  a  clear  policy  on  fall  management,   iden?fies  the  program  key  personnel  and  their  associated  du?es,  and  the  training  program   requirements.     •  Fall  protecZon  procedures-­‐  Project  specific,  wriAen    fall  protec?on  procedures  should  be   developed  and  implemented  well  in  advance  of  any  work  being  performed,  and  reviewed  by  all   personnel  associated  with  job  opera?ons.     •  EliminaZng  and  controlling  fall  hazards-­‐  Elimina?ng  fall  hazards  are  always  a  beAer   op?on  than  protec?ng  from  them.  Ensure  competent  and  qualified  personnel  iden?fy  and   implement  proper  control  mechanisms     •  Rescue  procedures-­‐  Workers  must  be  trained  on  rescue  procedures  in  the  event  of  a  fall,   such  as  communica?on,  suspension  trauma,  first  aid  and  CPR.  Only  trained  and  qualified   personnel  should  ever  aAempt  a  rescue!     •  Incident  invesZgaZons-­‐  Incidents  should  always  be  inves?gated  for  root  cause  and   communicated  to  aid  in  the  preven?on  of  the  incident  occurring  again.       •  EvaluaZng  program  effecZveness-­‐  Your  fall  management  program  is  a  living,  breathing   program  that  must  con?nuously  evolve  with  your  company.  The  program  should  be  evaluated   whenever  there  is  a  relevant  change  in  work  opera?ons  or  procedure.  Evaluate  the  program  at   least  annually.      
  140. 140. WHAT’S  YOUR   COMPANY  SAFETY   CULTURE  LIKE? •  Injury and Illness Prevention Plans •  Hazard Specific Plans •  Management Commitment •  Employee Involvement •  Communication Unsafe Conditions or Unsafe Acts and Behaviors? •  Complacency •  Short Cuts •  Lack of Training •  Lack of Supervision •  Lack of Understanding •  Subcontractors! QUESTION:  WHO  IS  RESPONSIBLE  FOR  YOUR  SAFETY?           I  AM!  
  141. 141. EFFECTIVE  FALL   PROGRAM  ELEMENTS •  OSHA’s Fall Prevention Campaign June 2-6, 2014 •  Nationwide Safety Stand Down •  Over 1 Million workers in all 50 states participated •  Hundreds of violations and hazardous conditions found and mitigated •  Safety Week 2015 May 4 thru May 10
  142. 142. EFFECTIVE  FALL   PROGRAM  ELEMENTS-­‐   PLAN PLAN ahead to get the job done safely! •  Employers  must  plan  projects  to  ensure  that  the  job  is  done  safely,  and  fall   hazards  are  assessed  and  mi?gated.     •  Begin  by  deciding  how  the  job  will  be  done,  what  tasks  will  be  involved,   and  what  safety  equipment  may  be  needed  to  complete  each  task.   •  When  es?ma?ng  the  cost  of  a  job,  employers  should  include  safety   equipment,  and  plan  to  have  all  the  necessary  equipment  and  tools   available  at  the  construc?on  site.     •  Get  your  team  involved!  Es?mators,  Engineers,  Project  Managers,  Safety    
  143. 143. EFFECTIVE  FALL   PROGRAM  ELEMENTS-­‐   PROVIDE •  PROVIDE the right equipment! •  Workers  who  are  exposed  to  fall  hazards  are  at  risk  for  serious  injury  or   death  if  they  should  fall.   •  To  protect  workers,  employers  must  provide  the  right  kinds  of  ladders,   scaffolds,  and  fall  preven?on  &  protec?on  safety  equipment.   •  Remember-­‐  PPE  isn’t  one  size  fits  all!  Make  sure  the  equipment  fits   properly,  with  special  emphasis  on  worker  gender  (anthropometry).  
  144. 144. EFFECTIVE  FALL   PROGRAM  ELEMENTS-­‐   TRAIN Reference: •  OSHA CFR 1910/1926 •  OSHA 2254 •  ANSI Z359 & Z490.1 •  EM385 •  Manufacturer Specs & Recommendations •  Falls  can  be  prevented  when  workers  understand  proper  set-­‐up  and  safe  use   of  equipment  through  structured  orienta?on  and  training.   •  Employers  must  train  workers  in  hazard  recogni?on  and  in  the  maintenance   and  inspec?on  of  ladders,  scaffolds,  fall  protec?on  and  preven?on  systems,   and  other  equipment  they'll  be  using  on  the  job.   •  U?lize  all  training  and  learning  mediums  including  instructor  led,  online,   blended,  hands-­‐on  prac?cal,  demonstra?ons,  toolbox  talks  and  safety   mee?ngs.  Encourage  management  and  employee  par?cipa?on!  
  145. 145. YOUR  TRAINING   CULTURE   SOME  QUESTIONS:       DOES  TRAINING  IMPROVE  WORKER  BEHAVIOR  AND  CONFINDENCE?       NO     DOES  TRAINING  REDUCE  INCIDENT,  INJURY  AND  ILLNESS  RATES?       NO     DOES  TRAINING  HAVE  A  DIRECT  EFFECT  ON  QUALITY  AND  PERFORMANCE?     NO       HOW  ABOUT  EFFECTIVE  TRAINING?     “What’s  worse  than   training  your  workers   and  losing  them?  Not   training  them  and   keeping  them”                                          -­‐  Zig  Ziglar  
  146. 146. YOUR  TRAINING   CULTURE   WHAT  CRITERIA  SHOULD  MY  TRAINING   PROGRAM  BE  EVALUATED  AGAINST?     •  DEFENSIBLE-­‐  Are  you  prepared  to  defend  your  program  under  any   worse  case  scenario?   •  RECOGNIZED-­‐  Home  grown  programs  or  regula?on/standard/ industry  based?  CEUs?   •  ONGOING-­‐  One  and  done?  Regiment  and  schedule.  Incident  follow   up.   •  MEASURABLE-­‐  Reduc?on  in  incidents  clearly  resul?ng  from  effec?ve   training  and  learning  reten?on  vs.  plain  luck?  Tes?ng  results?  Student   course  evalua?on/survey?   •  EFFECTIVE-­‐  Dis?nc?ve  culture  change  in  workforce  behavior  and   awareness?  Was  training  the  cure  for  the  problem?      
  147. 147. YOUR  TRAINING   CULTURE   OSHA  2254   Index of Training Requirements for •  General Industry (1910) •  Construction (1926) •  Maritime (1915, 1917, 1918) •  Agriculture (1928) •  Federal Employees (1960) OSHA 2254- Training Requirements in OSHA Standards and Training Guidelines
  148. 148. YOUR  TRAINING   CULTURE   ANSI  Z490.1   •  Criteria  was  developed  by   combining  accepted   pracZces  in  the  training   industry  with  those  in  the   safety,  health,  and   environmental  industries     •  Standard  sZpulates  how   to  effecZvely:   •  Analyze   •  Design     •  Develop   •  Deliver   •  Implement   •  Evaluate   ANSI Z490.1- Criteria for Accepted Practices in Safety, Health and Environmental Training
  149. 149. YOUR  TRAINING   CULTURE   EM385-­‐1-­‐1   •  Compliance  with  the  U.S.   Army  Corps  of  Engineers   Engineering  Manual   385-­‐1-­‐1-­‐  Safety  and  Health   Requirements  is  required  by   Federal/DoD  contract   specificaZons  in   construcZon,  alteraZon  and   demoliZon  contracts       •  Over  250  references  to   training  requirements   •  2014  Revisions:  Fall   ProtecZon/Competent   person,  a  minimum  of  24   hours,  (at  least  16  hours  of   formal  classroom  training   and  8  hours  of  pracZcal   applicaZon)   EM385-1-1- Engineering Manual for Safety & Health Requirements  
  150. 150. YOUR  TRAINING   CULTURE   IACET  CEU’s       A  WORD  ABOUT  CONTINUING  EDUCATION  UNITS  (CEUs)     IACET-­‐  The  Interna?onal  Associa?on  for  Con?nuing  Educa?on  and  Training       •  CommiAed  to  best  prac?ces  in  adult  learning  and  professional  training   •  Interna1onally  recognized  training   •  Professional  development     •  CEUs  and  Contact  Hours   •  Authorized  IACET  providers  must  follow  strict  design  and  development   criteria  for  CEU  course  qualifica?ons  including  needs  assessment,  learning   objec?ves/outcomes  and  cer?ficates  of  comple?on  
  151. 151. Reference Materials and Resources • Where  can  you  go   for  more  help,   informaZon  and   resources  on   structuring  an   effecZve  fall   program?           •  Occupa?onal  Safety  &  Health  Agency  (OSHA)                          www.osha.gov/     •  Center  for  Construc?on  Research  and  Training  (CPWR)                      hAp://www.cpwr.com/                      hAp://stopconstruc?onfalls.com/     •  Na?onal  Ins?tute  of  Occupa?onal  Safety  and  Health  (NIOSH)                      hAp://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/falls/     •  American  Na?onal  Standards  Ins?tute  (ANSI)                      hAp://ansi.org/     •         Na?onal  Associa?on  of  Tower  Erectors  (NATE)                    hAp://natehome.com/     •         Equipment  Manufacturers-­‐  Miller,  DBI  SALA,  Garlock     •  ClickSafety  Online  Safety  Training     www.ClickSafety.com    
  152. 152. Summary       Some  Fall  Management  Program  Tips     •  Establish  effec?ve  safety  culture.  Remember:  Plan.  Provide.  Train.   •  Learn  the  ANSI  Z359  Fall  Protec?on  Code   •  Evaluate  your  training  programs-­‐  DROME   •  Always  inves?gate  incidents  and  share  conclusions   •  Prac?ce  safety  stand  downs!   •  Safety  Week  2015-­‐  May  4  through  May  10-­‐   hAp://www.safetyweek2015.com/    
  153. 153. ANSI  Z359  Fall  PrevenZon  Code:   Fundamentals  for  an  EffecZve   Management  Program       QuesZons?     THANK  YOU!     Paul  J.  Colangelo,  STS,   CHST,  CET   NaZonal  Director  of   Compliance  Programs   ClickSafety.com  
  154. 154. Northeast  Wireless  Safety  Summit   February  4,  2015   #NEWSS     #NEWSS          166   Thank  You  to  Our  Event  Sponsors!  
  155. 155. Northeast  Wireless  Safety  Summit   February  4,  2015   #NEWSS     #NEWSS          167   Thank  You  to  Our  Event  Sponsors!  
  156. 156. Northeast  Wireless  Safety  Summit   February  4,  2015   #NEWSS     #NEWSS          168   Thank  You  to  Our  Event  Sponsors!    
  157. 157. Northeast  Wireless  Safety  Summit   February  4,  2015   #NEWSS     #NEWSS          169   Thank  You  to  Our  Event  Partners!   NORTHEAST DAS& small cell ASSOCIATION
  158. 158. Thank  You  for  AAending  

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