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Professional Ethics with Values Formation
Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI
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Week 8 Sessions 21 23 Personal Value System (E.Q.)

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Personal Value System

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Week 8 Sessions 21 23 Personal Value System (E.Q.)

  1. 1. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 1 of 15 TOPIC TITLE: PERSONAL VALUE SYSTEM (E.Q.) SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: At the end of the topic session the students are expected to: Cognitive: 1. Define emotional intelligence (E.Q.) and intelligence quotient (I.Q.). 2. Identify the roots of the term emotional intelligence (E.Q.) 3. Analyze the different definitions of E.Q. and be able to create their own definitions. 4. Identify the difference between E.Q. and I.Q. 5. Enumerate the eight fundamental E.Q. skills. 6. Explain the different models of E.Q. Affective: 1. Listen to others with respect. 2. Participate in class discussions and activities actively. Psychomotor: 1. Follow the instructions given in the short activities. MATERIALS/EQUIPMENT: o Topic Slides o OHP o Student Handout 5 - Testing Your Emotional Intelligence TOPIC PREPARATION: o The first two sessions will discuss the basic theories and concepts of emotional intelligence (definition, aspect, signs of high and low emotional intelligence). o Reproduce a sufficient number of copies of the Student Handout 5 (Testing Your Emotional Intelligence). o The instructor may visit the following websites for further readings on theories of emotional intelligence: http://www.kellybear.com/TeacherArticles/TeacherTip3.html http://www.6seconds.org/index.php TOPIC PRESENTATION: The topic will be the continuation of the discussion for Personal Value System (E.Q.). Discussions will include Emotional Intelligence, Aspects of E.Q. According to Goleman, Six Seconds Emotional Intelligence Network and Signs of High and Low E.Q. This will be the suggested flow of discussion for Emotional Intelligence. 1. Introduce the continuation of the topic to the class by presenting two situations which show the comparison between emotional intelligence (E.Q.) and cognitive intelligence (or intelligent quotient). 2. Furthermore, facilitate a brief discussion by identifying the
  2. 2. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 2 of 15 qualities of a person with high emotional quotient. Enumerate some of the benefits of having a high E.Q. First Example: Bill was brilliant in his field and the best IT person in the office as to technical skills, but his interpersonal/relational skills were very low. He was abrasive, arrogant, short-tempered and a perfectionist. Other people didn't like to work with him and he was unable to explain things in terms other people could understand. Second Example: Mary, who was also in the IT department, had good technical skills and a good education, though it was less than Bill’s. However, her emotional intelligence more than made up for this. She was able to handle herself and other people well and to explain things calmly and clearly. People loved to work with her and requested her by name. She received promotion after promotion because of her technical expertise and her high emotional intelligence. Source: http://www.teach-nology.com/tutorials/teaching/iq/ 3. Present a brief history on how E.Q. started and give different definitions of this term. 4. Challenge students to compare the definitions and identify the key points in each term. 5. After presenting basic theories and concepts on emotional intelligence, distribute Student Handout 5 to the class. Have them answer the distributed test questionnaire. 6. The instructor may interpret their scores right after they have answered the emotional intelligence exam. Personal Value System - cont. Page 1 of 8 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 1 of 8 Personal Value System – cont. o Emotional Intelligence v (1990) Dr. Salovey of Yale University & Dr. Mayer of the University of New Hampshire started to publish articles on emotional intelligence v Daniel Goldman – “Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More than I.Q.” and “Working with Emotional Intelligence” • “Working with Emotional Intelligence” - shaken up the old order and brought the entrenched mid-century ways of teaching and business under scrutiny [ See Personal Value System - cont., Page 1 of 8 ] Emotional Intelligence ¦ History In 1990, Dr. Peter Salovey of Yale University and Dr. John Mayer of the University of New Hampshire started to publish articles on emotional intelligence. They tested how people could identify emotions in faces, abstract designs and colors, and from these studies, they believed they discovered a sort of universal aptitude of emotions. Several years after that breakthrough, Daniel Goleman published a book entitled “Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More than I.Q.” Afterwards, a follow-up book was published entitled “Working with Emotional Intelligence,” has shaken up the old order and brought the entrenched mid-century ways of teaching and business under scrutiny.
  3. 3. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 3 of 15 Personal Value System - cont. Page 2 of 8 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 2 of 8 o Emotional Intelligence v definitions: • Salovey and Meyer define E.Q. as “… the subset of social intelligence that involves the ability to monitor one’s own and other’s feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one’s thinking and actions” • Goleman claims that emotional intelligence “does not give free reins to feelings (let it all hang out). Rather, it means managing feelings so that they are expressed appropriately and effectively, enabling people to work together smoothly toward their common goals” • “the awareness of and ability to manage one’s emotions in a healthy and productive manner” • indicates a kind of intelligence or skill that involves the ability to perceive, assess and positively influence one’s own and other people’s emotions Personal Value System – cont. [ See Personal Value System - cont., Page 2 of 8 ] ¦ Definitions v Salovey and Meyer (1990) define emotional intelligence as “… the subset of social intelligence that involves the ability to monitor one’s own and other’s feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one’s thinking and actions.” v Goleman (1998) claims that emotional intelligence “does not give free reins to feelings (let it all hang out). Rather, it means managing feelings so that they are expressed appropriately and effectively, enabling people to work together smoothly toward their common goals.” v “The awareness of and ability to manage one’s emotions in a healthy and productive manner.” - www.allpsych.com/dictionary/dictionary2.html v E.Q. indicates a kind of intelligence or skill that involves the ability to perceive, assess and positively influence one’s own and other people’s emotions. v E.Q. vs. I.Q. • I.Q. refers to the numerical rate of one’s cognitive ability. It is made up of a series of standardized tests which attempt to measure intelligence. Intelligence quotient usually involves several kinds of intelligence which were developed by Dr. Howard Gardner, an education professor from Harvard University. Recall that Gardner provided kinds of multiple intelligence, namely, spatial, musical, naturalist, intrapersonal, bodily-kinesthetic, interpersonal, linguistic, existential, and logical-mathematical intelligence. Emotional intelligence, on the other hand, refers to a skill or capacity to control the existing/present emotion of oneself and of others. This will be the suggested flow of discussion for Aspects of E.Q. According to Goleman, Six Seconds Emotional Intelligence Network and Signs of High and Low E.Q. 1. Discuss the aspects and domains of E.Q. 2. Present the six seconds E.Q. model. Discuss what it means and what does it take to be emotionally intelligent. 3. Present the list of general characteristics of people with low and high E.Q. according to Steve Hein.
  4. 4. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 4 of 15 Personal Value System - cont. Page 3 of 8 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 3 of 8 o Aspects of E.Q. v understanding yourself, your goals, intentions, responses, behavior and all v understanding others and their feelings v domains: • knowing your emotions • managing your emotions • recognizing and understanding other people’s emotions • managing relationships Personal Value System – cont. Personal Value System - cont. Page 4 of 8 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 4 of 8 o Aspects of E.Q. v 6 seconds’ E.Q. model: • know yourself § self-awareness § self-honesty § independence • choose yourself § delay gratification § prioritize § manage feelings § optimism § accountability Personal Value System – cont. [ See Personal Value System - cont., Pages 3 - 4 of 8 ] Aspects of E.Q. ¦ Understanding yourself, your goals, intentions, responses, behavior and all. ¦ Understanding others and their feelings. ¦ Domains of E.Q. According to Goleman: v Knowing your emotions v Managing your emotions v Recognizing and understanding other people’s emotions v Managing relationships, i.e. managing the emotions of others ¦ Six Seconds’ E.Q. Model v Know Yourself - involves increasing self awareness and understanding how the individual functions Questions: • What makes you think, act and feel the way you do? • What parts of your reaction are habitual (done without conscious thought) and which parts are intentional? • What are you afraid of? Components: • Self- awareness. The recognition of the causes and effects of your own feelings and reaction. • Self-honesty. The acceptance of your own qualities and faults, your own experiences and emotions, and your own power. • Independence. The recognition of your own rights and responsibilities as a free person. v Choose Yourself - involves building self-management and consciously choosing your thoughts, feelings and actions Questions: • How do you know what is right for you? • Can you increase your awareness of your actions so that you see their effects? • If you were not afraid, what would you do? • Can you live with doing less that what is right? Components: • Delay gratification. Take "right" action even though there may not be immediate reward. • Prioritize. Bring to the forefront of your mind a "checklist" of what is most important so you can weigh decisions and actions. • Manage feelings. Use simple techniques, like a pause for reflection, to act - not react.
  5. 5. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 5 of 15 Personal Value System - cont. Page 5 of 8 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 5 of 8 Personal Value System – cont. o Aspects of E.Q. v 6 seconds’ E.Q. model: • give yourself § interdependence § empathy § noble goals v summary of the 8 fundamental emotional skills: Personal Value System - cont. Page 6 of 8 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 6 of 8 o Aspects of E.Q. v ways on how to be emotionally literate • increase self-awareness • manage emotions • norms for acceptable behavior • control negative impulses • develop listening and communication skills • self-motivate • involve parents • nurture your own E.Q. v signs of high E.Q. (Steve Hein) • expresses his feelings clearly and directly • does not disguise thoughts as feeling • not afraid to express his feelings Personal Value System – cont. • Optimism. Recognize that you have choice, that you can make a difference, that you are an important part of a living whole. • Accountability. Hold yourself to high standards and do what is right even when it seems hopeless. [ See Personal Value System - cont., Pages 5 - 6 of 8 ] v Give Yourself - involves developing a self-direction and creating a more compassionate world through empathy and principled decision-making Questions: • Am I giving a legacy of good? • Am I healing or hurting? • Do I live the golden rule? • Will I die knowing I lived well? Components: • Interdependence. The recognition of an individual's place in the larger community, awareness and decision making that takes into account the short & long- term consequences of our actions. • Empathy. Use your awareness to guide your choices. • Noble Goals. Commit to action that serves ideals & serves others, but does not hurt anyone and does not profit one over another. The following table summarizes the eight fundamental emotional intelligence skills: Know Yourself Choose Yourself Give Yourself Enhance emotional literacy Apply consequential thinking Increase empathy Recognize patterns Navigate emotions Pursue noble goals Engage intrinsic motivation Exercise optimism ¦ Ways on How to Be Emotionally Literate v Increase self-awareness • Encourage the individual to identify their feelings, recognize links between feelings, thoughts and actions. • Guide him to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses to develop realistic view of themselves. v Manage emotions • Each individual must be aware that each has the power to cope with negative feelings in constructive ways. v Norms for acceptable behavior • Acknowledge and appreciate differences in other’s feelings and perspectives.
  6. 6. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 6 of 15 v Control negative impulses • This can be done through self-regulation. The choices that have been made today will determine the kind of future each one has. v Develop listening and communication skills • Emphasize nonverbal communication including tone of voice, gestures, facial expressions, and eye contact. • Be a good listener. It is important to express one’s ideas and emotions clearly and effectively. • Be assertive and not to be aggressive and passive. v Self-motivate • This can be done by setting clear goals and developing a hopeful and optimistic attitude. • Encourage self-confidence, zeal and patience. Taking responsibility for such actions is also a prerequisite. v Involve parents • Parents/guardians can serve as a model in order to have an emotionally healthy behavior in the home. v Nurture your own E.Q. • Strive to be empathic, self-disciplined, enthusiastic, tolerant and compassionate. ¦ Signs of High and Low E.Q. Steve Hein (1999) suggests the general characteristics of people who have high and low level of E.Q. v Signs of High E.Q. • Expresses his feelings clearly and directly (Example: “I feel irritated…”). • Does not disguise thoughts as feeling (Example: "I feel like...... ”). • Not afraid to express his feelings. • Not dominated by negative emotions such as fear, worry, guilt, shame, embarrassment, obligation, disappointment, hopelessness, powerlessness, dependency, victimization and discouragement. • Recognize non-verbal communication. • Use feelings to guide him through life. • Balances feelings with reason, logic, and reality. • Acts out of desire, not because of duty, guilt, force or obligation. • Independent, self-reliant and morally autonomous. • Intrinsically motivated. • Not motivated by power, wealth, status, fame, or approval. • Emotionally resilient. • Optimistic. • Interested in other people's feelings. • Comfortable talking about feelings.
  7. 7. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 7 of 15 Personal Value System - cont. Page 7 of 8 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 7 of 8 o Aspects of E.Q. v signs of low E.Q. (Steve Hein) • doesn't take responsibilities for his feelings • can't tell why she feels the way she does, or can't do it without blaming someone else • has the tendency to attack, blame, command, criticize, interrupt, invalidate, lecture, advise and judge other people • tries to analyze everybody • often begins sentences with "I think you...“ • sends "You messages" disguised as "I feel messages" • lays guilt trips on other people • exaggerates or minimizes his feelings • lacks integrity and a sense of conscience • lacks integrity and a sense of conscience • carries grudges; unforgiving • acts out his feelings, rather than talking them out Personal Value System – cont. • Not immobilized by fear or worry. • Able to identify multiple concurrent feelings. [ See Personal Value System - cont., Pages 7 - 8 of 8 ] v Signs of Low E.Q. • Doesn't take responsibilities for his feelings; has the tendency to blame others for them. • Can't put together three word sentences starting with "I feel..." • Can't tell you why she feels the way she does, or can't do it without blaming someone else. • Has the tendency to attack, blame, command, criticize, interrupt, invalidate, lecture, advise and judge other people. • Tries to analyze everybody, for instance, when someone tries to express his feelings. • Often begins sentences with "I think you..." • Sends "You messages" disguised as "I feel messages." For example, "I feel like you......" • Lays guilt trips on other people. • Withholds information about or lies about his feelings (emotional dishonesty). • Exaggerates or minimizes his feelings. • Lets things build up, then they blow up, or react strongly to something relatively minor. • Lacks integrity and a sense of conscience. • Carries grudges; unforgiving. • Doesn’t tell you where you really stand with her. • Uncomfortable to be around. • Acts out his feelings, rather than talking them out. • Plays games; is indirect or evasive. • Insensitive to other’s feelings. • Has no empathy and compassion. • Rigid, inflexible; needs rules and structure to feel secure. • Not emotionally available; offers little chance of emotional intimacy. • Does not consider your feelings before acting. • Does not consider their own future feelings before acting. • Insecure and defensive and finds it hard to admit mistakes, express remorse, or apologize sincerely. • Avoids responsibility by saying things like: "What was I supposed to do? I had no choice!” • Pessimistic and often believes the world is unfair. • Frequently feels inadequate, disappointed, resentful, bitter or victimized. • Locks himself into courses of action against common sense, or jumps ship at the first sight of trouble. • Avoids connections with people and seeks substitute relationships with everything from pets and plants to imaginary beings. • Rigidly clings to his beliefs because he is too insecure to be open to new facts. • Can tell you the details of an event, and what they think about it, but can't tell you how she feels about it.
  8. 8. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 8 of 15 Personal Value System - cont. Page 8 of 8 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 8 of 8 References/Sources Punsalan, T. and Badayos, P., (1999), Buhay: Edukasyon sa Pagpapahalaga (EP) Para sa Kolehiyo, Values Education Faculty, Philippine Normal University Instructor’s Guide (Week 9 Session 26): Emotional Intelligence. Child and Adolescent Development. STI Education Services Group, 2006 Dunn, S.G. (2007), Emotional Intelligence vs. Cognitive Intelligence, Teachnology : The Online Teacher Resource, Retrieved June, 2007 from http://www.teach- nology.com/tutorials/teaching/iq/ Davies, L., (2000, October), Emotional Intelligence: An Essential Component of Education, Kelly Bear Website, Retrieved June, 2007 from http://www.kellybear.com/TeacherArticles/TeacherTip3.ht ml “Emotional Intelligence.” Wikipedia–the free encyclopedia. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_intelligence, retrieved June, 2007 allpsych.com/dictionary/dictionary2.html http://www.6seconds.org/index.php • Uses his intellect to judge and criticize others without realizing he is feeling superior, judgmental, critical, and without awareness of how his actions affects others' feelings. • A poor listener. Interrupts. Invalidates. Misses the emotions being communicated. Focuses on "facts" rather than feelings. References: Punsalan, T. and Badayos, P., (1999), Buhay: Edukasyon sa Pagpapahalaga (EP) Para sa Kolehiyo, Values Education Faculty, Philippine Normal University Instructor’s Guide (Week 9 Session 26): Emotional Intelligence. Child and Adolescent Development. STI Education Services Group, 2006 Dunn, S.G. (2007), Emotional Intelligence vs. Cognitive Intelligence, Teachnology : The Online Teacher Resource, Retrieved June, 2007 from http://www.teach-nology.com/tutorials/teaching/iq/ Davies, L., (2000, October), Emotional Intelligence: An Essential Component of Education, Kelly Bear Website, Retrieved June, 2007 from http://www.kellybear.com/TeacherArticles/TeacherTip3.html “Emotional Intelligence.” Wikipedia–the free encyclopedia. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_intelligence, retrieved June, 2007 allpsych.com/dictionary/dictionary2.html http://www.6seconds.org/index.php EVALUATION/GENERALIZATION: Class Activity To summarize the session, determine the level of EQ of the class using a sample EQ test designed by EI Hay Group Services. After answering the questionnaire, ask students to sum up their scores. Evaluate the answers of the students by referring to the provided handout for the instructor (interpreting your scores). Note that the purpose of this activity is to provide the students an idea of their E.Q. level. However, the suggested questionnaire in this activity does not provide a comprehensive tool for evaluating one’s emotional intelligence. Discuss the interpretations for each question. Give students a sufficient amount of time to reflect on their respective E.Q. scores.
  9. 9. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 9 of 15 TOPIC TITLE: PERSONAL VALUE SYSTEM (E.Q.) – continuation SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: At the end of the topic session the students are expected to: Cognitive: 1. Recall Robert Plutchik’s eight primary emotions of man. 2. Enumerate and explain the four extreme types of emotion according to Sid Cornier. 3. Identify some of the possible ways to avoid the four extreme types of emotion. 4. Name and explain the foundations of emotional intelligence. 5. Identify the sub-types of each foundation. Affective: 1. Listen to others with respect. 2. Participate in class discussions and activities actively. Psychomotor: 1. Follow the instructions given in the suggested activities. MATERIALS/EQUIPMENT: o Topic Slides o OHP o Audio file (mp3, wma, CD file) of any soothing and “easy listening” music o CD/cassette player (optional) o PC with mp3 or wma player (optional) o DVD/CD copy of “Anger Management” o DVD/CD player TOPIC PREPARATION: o Incorporate various kinds of strategies while discussing the suggested topics. The instructor may use the suggested learning activities below to facilitate a thorough and creative discussion of the featured course topics. o Synthesize all the key concepts and principles discussed in the previous session. o Anticipate the questions that the students might ask and be prepared to answer them. o The instructor may visit the following website for further theories on emotional energy (energy drains and energy moves): http://www.oprah.com/health/omag/health_omag_200301_energ y.html TOPIC PRESENTATION: The topic will be the continuation of the discussion for Personal Value System (E.Q.). Discussions will include Extreme Types of Emotions and Foundations of Emotional Intelligence.
  10. 10. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 10 of 15 This will be the suggested flow of discussion for Extreme Types of Emotions. 1. Begin the session by asking the class to compile/classify the eight primary kinds of emotion: negative in one column and positive in another. 2. State that the initial part of the session will focus on the discussion of the four extreme types of emotions. 3. Furthermore, it will attempt to describe what happens when people get angry and what they do as well as not do. 4. Prepare the audio system. While playing a soothing/easy listening music, ask the students to reflect on the last time that they were angry. Instruct them to identify on where the anger came from. 5. Ask them if these angry feelings have synonyms such as disappointment, frustration, rage or etc. 6. While playing the audio file, ask the students to pair up (let them choose their desired partner). Throw the following questions to the class (have them share their answers on their respective partners): Questions: v What does it feel like when someone is angry at/with you? v How did you know the other person was angry? v What did they do in reaction to the other person’s anger? 7. After their sharing, ask each pair to join with another pair. Ask the new foursomes to discuss if there is an absolute correct way to handle anger. Have them report back to the class. Record their answers on the blackboard. 8. The instructor may also introduce the course topic by facilitating a film viewing activity to the class (Anger Management - starred by Adam Sandler and Jack Nicholson). 9. Discuss the four extreme types of emotions. Personal Value System - cont. Page 1 of 9 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 7 of 9 o Foundations of Emotional Intelligence v emotional depth • commitment § requires unusual strength and courage § individuals who are ready to commit are said to be “risk-takers” • influence without authority - material/economic status, age, social role, educational attainment and experience • unique potential & purpose - different purposes on why we exist • applied integrity § ways on how we facilitate our emotions § emotions which have a material purpose often lead into the individual’s glory, thus, establishing his integrity Personal Value System – cont. [ See Personal Value System - cont., Page 1 of 9 ] Extreme Types of Emotion Sid Cormier (1992) enumerates four extreme types of emotions which can lead into undesirable/odd results. ¦ Guilt Guilt feeling, like the fly, keeps buzzing until we deal with it. However, how and why does it occur to us? Dictionary.com defines the word guilt as “a feeling of responsibility or remorse for some offense, crime, wrong and etc., whether real or imagined.” Some believe that one of the compositions of human conscience is the feeling of guilt. In this context, guilt somehow acts as an imaginary prosecutor which brings us up short and condemns us if we committed erroneous actions and thoughts. On the other hand, there are also individuals who perceive that guilt is a kind of inherent gift. Unfortunately, because of our pride, we tend not to use it. Instead, we usually attempt to suppress it. The following are some of the possible techniques on how to avoid the feeling of guilt:
  11. 11. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 11 of 15 Personal Value System - cont. Page 2 of 9 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 2 of 9 Personal Value System – cont. o Extreme Types of Emotion v fear • inherently present among individuals • reminds us to monitor our actions, thoughts and behaviors in order to avoid any possible harm • real or imaginary • fear serves as a preemptive response of the individual towards the existing danger/threat • techniques on how to avoid this feeling: § make yourself busy § clear things up § share your thoughts Personal Value System - cont. Page 3 of 9 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 3 of 9 o Extreme Types of Emotion v grief • denial - “This can’t be happening.” • anger - “How dare you do this to me?” • bargaining - “I would do anything just let me live.” • depression - “I’m so sad, why bother with anything?” • acceptance – “I know that I will be in better place” v anger • often associated with the feeling of disgust in which it can be resulted into physical and emotional harm Personal Value System – cont. v Confessions may be made in writing. One of the effective ways to avoid the feeling of guilt is to make a confession (admission of committed offense) in your diary. Apologize to the person whom you committed such erroneous act. The letter may not be necessarily given to the injured person. v Do not try to hide it, nor suppress it. Trying to suppress this feeling can lead into serious physical and mental illnesses such as anxiety disorder and etc. v Confiding/sharing the feeling with a friend/relative. A person could bring his emotional feelings into balance by trusting someone who can listen to him without judging or condemning his actions/thoughts. v Pray/meditate. [ See Personal Value System - cont., Pages 2 - 3 of 9 ] ¦ Fear Just like all other extreme types of emotion, fear is inherently present among individuals. It reminds us to monitor our actions, thoughts and behaviors in order to avoid any possible harm. As stated before, fear maybe imaginary (that is, based on trauma that was experienced in the past) or real (that is, based on the present and immediate possibility of any danger/threat). Recall that in the context of evolutionary point of view, fear serves as a preemptive response of the individual towards the existing danger/threat. The following are some of the possible techniques on how to avoid this feeling: v Make yourself busy. This enables us to direct our focus from the things that we fear to the things that we love to do. v Clear things up. We need to define the things that we normally fear by listing and at the same time, designing a plan (or possible plans) on how to conquer these things. v Share your thoughts. It is also important to share our fearful thoughts to the people we normally trust. They can give us comfort and advices on how to deal, if not conquer, with these things. ¦ Grief It is normally associated with death. Elizabeth Ross (author of the book entitled “On Death and Dying”) proposed five stages of grief which include denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. v Denial. In this stage, the individual tends to act as if the loss of his loved one is just a nightmare. He cannot accept the reality that he could not be with him/her anymore. • “This can’t be happening.” v Anger. The occurrence of this feeling is directed either towards God, oneself or other people. • “How dare you do this to me?”
  12. 12. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 12 of 15 v Bargaining. Arises in both or either parties: the one who is dying and the relatives of the dying person. • “I would do anything just let me live.” v Depression. Refers to the extreme form of sorrow and grief. This can lead into serious physical and mental problems if the person failed to recover into his previous conscious state. • “I’m so sad, why bother with anything?” v Acceptance. Dying is a difficult business. Unfortunately, it is an inevitable human process that every individual must undertake. Until today, the issue on dealing with regard to dying is still widely unaccepted. Learning to accept the departure of the dying person is the most possible way to help him accept his fate. • “I know that I will be in a better place.” ¦ Anger Often associated with the feeling of disgust in which it can be resulted into physical and emotional harm. The following are some of the possible ways for anger management: v Exercise v Openness to have reconciliation This will be the suggested flow of discussion for Foundations of Emotional Intelligence. 1. Discuss the four foundations of emotional intelligence according to Robert Cooper and Ayman Sawaf (Executive E.Q.: Emotional Intelligence in Leadership and Organizations). 2. Afterwards, encourage the students to provide relevant examples in each foundation. Personal Value System - cont. Page 4 of 9 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 4 of 9 o Foundations of Emotional Intelligence v emotional literacy • emotional honesty § E.Q. helps us to determine as to when it is the right time to be emotionally honest § the society teaches us to be emotionally dishonest – to cover our true feelings with our own social role/status § emotional dishonesty may be dangerous because it can result into the degradation of one’s emotional state • emotional energy § having an exact level of emotional energy can influence the people around us to produce something desirable whether within a family unit, an organization, or the general society Personal Value System – cont. [ See Personal Value System - cont., Page 4 of 9 ] Foundations of Emotional Intelligence Robert Cooper and Ayman Sawaf (1997) proposed the four foundations of emotional intelligence in their book entitled “Executive E.Q.” ¦ Emotional Literacy - involves emotional honesty, emotional energy, emotional feedback and emotional connection & intuition v Emotional honesty. One must be emotionally aware in order to be emotionally honest. The role of emotional intelligence is essential to attain this state. E.Q. helps us to determine as to when it is the right time to be emotionally honest. Some of the social behaviorists agree that most of time, it is inappropriate to be emotionally honest. According to them, the society teaches us to be emotionally dishonest – to cover our true feelings with our own social role/status, physical gestures and etc. We always declare that we are in a good condition when we are not. It is because we are afraid that the society may give us an unusual treatment if we declare that we are not doing well. However, emotional dishonesty may be dangerous because it can result
  13. 13. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 13 of 15 Personal Value System - cont. Page 5 of 9 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 5 of 9 o Foundations of Emotional Intelligence • emotional connection & intuition § individuals tend to use their subjective aspect (intuition) instead of exercising their rational senses • emotional feedback § allows us to classify and summarize the values and emotions that we possess Ø learn how to accept your emotions and find ways on how to deal with them Ø listen to the results of the emotional feedback --- try to focus on what your emotions want to convey Ø struggle to guide your emotional energy towards a good, desirable and appropriate goal Personal Value System – cont. Personal Value System - cont. Page 6 of 9 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 6 of 9 o Foundations of Emotional Intelligence v emotional fitness • trust radius § in the context of Psychology, trust is essential to the concept of social influence, that is, an individual can persuade or influence someone who is trusting § Sociology considers trust as a mental state • genuine presence - the ability of the individual to be physically, mentally and emotionally aware on the situation at hand • constructive discontent - the sensitivity produced by this discontent (or irritation) merely serves as an impetus to motivate ourselves toward a much better condition • resilience & renewal - the individual’s ability to adjust on eccentric however relevant conditions that may affect his personal perspective about life in general Personal Value System – cont. into the degradation of one’s emotional state. Each of us must express our true feelings in order to get to know our “true selves” on a deeper level. v Emotional Energy. When someone feels so tired most of the time (or feeling so wasted), we may conclude that he has low level of emotional energy. Having an exact level of emotional energy can influence the people around us to produce something desirable whether within a family unit, an organization, or the general society. Positive level of emotional energy brings positive mood and output in every individual. The article from Oprah.com attempts to solve the emotional energy crisis by enumerating eight energy drains. It also provides eight corresponding steps (energy moves) on how to fix them. The following were directly quoted from the article written by Annie Gottlieb entitled Solving the Emotional Energy Crisis. Energy Drains Energy Moves Other people’s expectations Declare independence Loss of self Personalize your life Deprivation Add pleasure, beauty, fun Envy Count your blessings Worry Get going Unfinished business Do it or dump it Over commitment Say “yes” to yourself Holding on to loss Cry all your tears [ See Personal Value System - cont., Pages 5 - 6 of 9 ] v Emotional Connection and Intuition. Individuals who have this kind of sub foundation tend to use their subjective aspect (intuition) instead of exercising their rational senses. For instance, we Filipinos are generally fond of using our intuitions which are mostly subjective. Americans, on the other hand, are known for their pragmatic behavior which is generally based on practical considerations. v Emotional Feedback. It is also important to be emotionally aware for it allows us to classify and summarize the values and emotions that we possess. Robert K. Cooper and Ayman Sawaf prescribed three tips on how to facilitate our emotions. • Learn how to accept your emotions and find ways on how to deal with them. • Listen to the results of the emotional feedback --- try to focus on what your emotions want to convey. • Struggle to guide your emotional energy towards a good, desirable and appropriate goal. ¦ Emotional Fitness - involves genuine presence, trust radius, constructive discontent and resilience and renewal v Trust Radius. Involves two kinds of perspectives: psychological and sociological. In the context of psychology, trust is essential to the concept of social influence, that is, an individual can persuade or influence someone who is trusting. However, it is also a popular fact that it is very hard to regain trust once it is lost. Sociology considers trust as a mental state. Trust in the context of sociology involves competence, honesty and benevolence.
  14. 14. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 14 of 15 Personal Value System - cont. Page 7 of 9 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 7 of 9 o Foundations of Emotional Intelligence v emotional depth • commitment § requires unusual strength and courage § individuals who are ready to commit are said to be “risk-takers” • influence without authority - material/economic status, age, social role, educational attainment and experience • unique potential & purpose - different purposes on why we exist • applied integrity § ways on how we facilitate our emotions § emotions which have a material purpose often lead into the individual’s glory, thus, establishing his integrity Personal Value System – cont. Personal Value System - cont. Page 8 of 9 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 8 of 9 o Foundations of Emotional Intelligence v emotional alchemy • reflective time shifting - there are individuals who are capable of experiencing things that are made up of different kinds of emotions • intuitive flow – composed of intuitions that are based on one’s experiences • opportunity setting – “opportunity knocks only once” • crediting the future § we must work hard and strive in order to attain future success in life § involves an extreme degree of patience Personal Value System – cont. v Genuine Presence. Refers to the ability of the individual to be physically, mentally and emotionally aware on the situation at hand. v Constructive Discontent. Sometimes, loss of satisfaction can bring constructive outputs. Constructive discontent does not mean to be skeptic, or to be absolutely doubtful. The sensitivity produced by this discontent (or irritation) merely serves as an impetus to motivate ourselves toward a much better condition. Constructive in the sense that the individual does not aim for perfection, but aspiring to enhance not only his life, but the lives of other people. v Resilience and Renewal. Refers to the individual’s ability to adjust on eccentric however relevant conditions that may affect his personal perspective about life in general. It also involves the ways on how would the individual react if he experiences such failure. These are: • Remain to be a loser and dwell into that kind of situation; or • Start to improve your life, stand up, and keep your chin up. [ See Personal Value System - cont., Pages 7 - 9 of 9 ] ¦ Emotional Depth - involves unique potential and purpose, commitment, applied integrity and influence without authority v Commitment. This requires unusual strength and courage. It also requires faith, trust and love. Individuals who are ready to commit are said to be “risk-takers,” or the ones who can accept the possibility to fail. On the other hand, individuals who fear commitment may not be ready for such kind of interpersonal arrangement. v Influence without Authority. The following are the grounds to be influential, namely, material/economic status, age, social role (i.e. government position), educational attainment and experience. v Unique Potential and Purpose. No one is perfectly similar; our DNA characteristics are exclusively distinct from the others, the same goes with our fingerprints. Even our emotions and “intangible” characteristics (i.e. intelligence and moods) have various levels. We also have different purposes on why we exist. v Applied Integrity. Refers to the ways on how we facilitate our emotions. Most of the time, emotions which have a material purpose often lead into the individual’s glory, thus, establishing his integrity. ¦ Emotional Alchemy - involves intuitive flow, reflective time-shifting, opportunity sensing, creating the future v Reflective Time Shifting. There are individuals who are capable of experiencing things that are made up of different kinds of emotions. These experiences can help the individual to figure out plans and strategies on how to deal with them. Learning is a continuous process. It also serves as a training ground for them to discover effective ways on how to facilitate their emotions
  15. 15. Professional Ethics with Values Formation Personal Value System (Emotional Intelligence) *Property of STI Page 15 of 15 Personal Value System - cont. Page 9 of 9 Personal Value System - continuation Values Formation * Property of STI Page 9 of 9 References/Sources Punsalan, T. and Badayos, P., (1999), Buhay: Edukasyon sa Pagpapahalaga (EP) Para sa Kolehiyo, Values Education Faculty, Philippine Normal University Cooper, R. and Sawaf, A., (1998), Executive E.Q.: Emotional Intelligence in Leadership Organizations, Perigree Books Kubler-Ross, E. (1969), On Death and Dying, New York, Simon & Schuster Inc. Grossman, S., (1997, February), Principles for Transforming Business: The Artists Way, # 262 from R&D Innovator Volume 6, Number 2, Retrieved June 2007 from http://www.winstonbrill.com/bril001/html/article_index/articles/251- 300/article262_body.html Gottlieb, A. (2003, January), Solving the Emotional Energy Crisis, O, The Oprah Magazine, Retrieved June 2007 from http://www.oprah.com/health/omag/health_omag_200301_energy. jhtml “Trust.” Wikipedia–the free encyclopedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trust_(sociology), retrieved June, 2007 appropriately. v Intuitive Flow. It refers to intuitions that are based on one’s experiences. v Opportunity Setting. “Opportunity knocks only once.” v Crediting the Future. We must work hard and strive in order to attain future success in life. Success, just like all other positive elements of life, is not a simple midnight process. It also involves an extreme degree of patience. References: Punsalan, T. and Badayos, P., (1999), Buhay: Edukasyon sa Pagpapahalaga (EP) Para sa Kolehiyo, Values Education Faculty, Philippine Normal University Cooper, R. and Sawaf, A., (1998), Executive E.Q.: Emotional Intelligence in Leadership Organizations, Perigree Books Kubler-Ross, E. (1969), On Death and Dying, New York, Simon & Schuster Inc. Grossman, S., (1997, February), Principles for Transforming Business: The Artists Way, # 262 from R&D Innovator Volume 6, Number 2, Retrieved June 2007 from http://www.winstonbrill.com/bril001/html/article_index/articles/251- 300/article262_body.html Gottlieb, A. (2003, January), Solving the Emotional Energy Crisis, O, The Oprah Magazine, Retrieved June 2007 from http://www.oprah.com/health/omag/health_omag_200301_energy.html “Trust.” Wikipedia–the free encyclopedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trust_(sociology), retrieved June, 2007 EVALUATION/GENERALIZATION: Class Discussion Ask the students to restate the four foundations (and sub foundations) of emotional intelligence. Encourage them to provide relevant examples in each sub foundation.

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