 Poverty reduction, biodiversityconservation and climate protectionthrough improved management offorests Equipping of po...
 CIFOR, IUCN and PROFOR havebeen working jointly on anumber of areas DFID saw a great opportunity toemphasise the value ...
KNOW-FOR DeliverablesThis programme will develop: Application of knowledge on how forestscontribute to economicdevelopmen...
KNOW-FOR DeliverablesCIFOR Application of knowledge on howforests contribute to economicdevelopment, poverty reduction an...
DFID KNOW-FOR: CIFOR investmentsCross-cutting & emerging issues Evidence-based forestry Communications & knowledge shari...
PROFOR: background and approachLivelihoods FinancingGovernanceCross-sectoralPolicies• Multidonor partnershipsupported by a...
What we do
KNOW-FOR Deliverables Application of knowledge abouthow forests contribute toeconomic development, povertyreduction and c...
Targeted outputs andoutcomes 120 outputs (knowledgeactivities, toolkits, fieldnotes, publications, videos, etc.) Focusse...
Accessing KNOW-FOR Deliverableswww.profor.infowww.twitter.com/forestideaswww.vimeo.com/forestideas
KNOW-FOR: IUCN investmentsin support of the Bonn ChallengeKey deliverables1. Production and uptake of newknowledge and ana...
KNOW-FOR: IUCN INVESTMENTS• Knowledge package on all 6 thematic areas• National restoration (includingeconomic, carbon) as...
A common framework forknowledge uptake and useHighlighting synergies betweenCIFOR, IUCN and PROFOR
For more information:DFID: G-allison@dfid.gov.ukIUCN: carole.saint-laurent@iucn.orgwww.iucn.org; www.forestlandscaperestor...
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UNFF 10: Knowfor

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Presentation held during the 10th session of the UN Forum on Forests

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  • Intro: Forests are fundamental to DFID’s development efforts on three fronts. Forests reduce carbon emissions, help reduce poverty in rural communities and protect global and local environmental services such as water, soils and biodiversity. Developing countries are ramping up their practical efforts to reduce and reverse deforestation and forest degradation on the ground. Demand has grown for knowledge, evidence and information on international forestry. Policymakers and practitioners wish to know what works best where; and be able to apply that knowledge to what they do. Forest policies and projects that are poorly underpinned by science and evidence, or do not use the best combination of technology and local know-how, run the risk of repeating and replicating past mistakes; for example, high mortality of tree seedlings in tree planting schemes; poor match between tree species and site-specific conditions; unworkable park conservation projects; limited participation of local people in design and monitoring of projects with subsequent poor project results; and inequitable arrangements for sharing the benefits from trees and forests, leading to lack of care and maintenance of trees and other elements of forest ecosystems. There are gaps in knowledge. There is a need for, first, systematically gathered and rigorous information that is comparable across sites and countries; second, more knowledge about how forests contribute to livelihoods, poverty reduction and economic development in developing countries; third, measurement of the range of impacts on the ground from projects that aim to deliver Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+); and fourth, understanding about the varying cost of different land use practices and the benefits they provide. Finally, practitioners and policymakers need to know what kinds of financing and investment arrangements work for forests.
  • Intro: Forests are fundamental to DFID’s development efforts on three fronts. Forests reduce carbon emissions, help reduce poverty in rural communities and protect global and local environmental services such as water, soils and biodiversity. Developing countries are ramping up their practical efforts to reduce and reverse deforestation and forest degradation on the ground. Demand has grown for knowledge, evidence and information on international forestry. Policymakers and practitioners wish to know what works best where; and be able to apply that knowledge to what they do. Forest policies and projects that are poorly underpinned by science and evidence, or do not use the best combination of technology and local know-how, run the risk of repeating and replicating past mistakes; for example, high mortality of tree seedlings in tree planting schemes; poor match between tree species and site-specific conditions; unworkable park conservation projects; limited participation of local people in design and monitoring of projects with subsequent poor project results; and inequitable arrangements for sharing the benefits from trees and forests, leading to lack of care and maintenance of trees and other elements of forest ecosystems. There are gaps in knowledge. There is a need for, first, systematically gathered and rigorous information that is comparable across sites and countries; second, more knowledge about how forests contribute to livelihoods, poverty reduction and economic development in developing countries; third, measurement of the range of impacts on the ground from projects that aim to deliver Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+); and fourth, understanding about the varying cost of different land use practices and the benefits they provide. Finally, practitioners and policymakers need to know what kinds of financing and investment arrangements work for forests.
  • UNFF 10: Knowfor

    1. 1.  Poverty reduction, biodiversityconservation and climate protectionthrough improved management offorests Equipping of policymakers andpractitioners in developing countrieswith strategic knowledge, comparableevidence, reliable tools and systematicanalysis on forests and climate Recognition that many forest policiesand projects are poorly underpinned byscience, evidence and knowledgeKNOW-FORImproving the way knowledge on forestsis understood, communicated and used internationally
    2. 2.  CIFOR, IUCN and PROFOR havebeen working jointly on anumber of areas DFID saw a great opportunity toemphasise the value added ofglobally important organisationsworking together on knowledgeuptake Capitalizes on respective,complementary strengths andnetworks of partners:- CIFOR, IUCN, PROFORKNOW-FORImproving the way knowledge on forestsis understood, communicated and used internationally
    3. 3. KNOW-FOR DeliverablesThis programme will develop: Application of knowledge on how forestscontribute to economicdevelopment, poverty reduction andclimate change Systematic, rigorous and comparableevidence of what works and what does notin forestry science and practice, whichrapidly reaches those who need itinternationally and on the frontline Improved design and implementation ofbroader national policies and programmesin 40 countries Techniques and practices for forestrestoration (the “+” in REDD +) creatinghealthy landscapes in up to15 countries A broad suite of toolkits, analyses andknowledge products that are mainstreamedinto in 30 countries
    4. 4. KNOW-FOR DeliverablesCIFOR Application of knowledge on howforests contribute to economicdevelopment, poverty reduction andclimate change Systematic, rigorous and comparableevidence of what works and what doesnot in forestry science and practice,which rapidly reaches those who needit internationally and on the frontline. Improved design and implementationof broader national policies andprogrammes in 40 countries
    5. 5. DFID KNOW-FOR: CIFOR investmentsCross-cutting & emerging issues Evidence-based forestry Communications & knowledge sharing Future emerging issuesEnvironment portfolio Planted forests SFM capacity buildingGovernance portfolio Global & regional trade & investment impacts Property rights & REDD+Livelihoods portfolio Forests & food security Livelihoods in the context of REDD+ Poverty-Environment Network
    6. 6. PROFOR: background and approachLivelihoods FinancingGovernanceCross-sectoralPolicies• Multidonor partnershipsupported by aconsortium of 8 donorsand the World Bank• Secretariat is hosted bythe World Bank• Collaborative tiesestablished with theNFP facility and itssuccessor, the Forestand Farm Facility
    7. 7. What we do
    8. 8. KNOW-FOR Deliverables Application of knowledge abouthow forests contribute toeconomic development, povertyreduction and climate change Improved design andimplementation of nationalpolicies and programmes toolkits, analyses, videos, knowledgeproducts, publications, fieldnotes;
    9. 9. Targeted outputs andoutcomes 120 outputs (knowledgeactivities, toolkits, fieldnotes, publications, videos, etc.) Focussed dissemination throughinteractive search-based web and face-to-face interaction on-the-ground Mainstream findings intolocal, national, regional, global forests-related activitiesWhere appropriate, complement donoroperations (including World Bankgroup) At least 30 countriesKNOW-FOR Deliverables
    10. 10. Accessing KNOW-FOR Deliverableswww.profor.infowww.twitter.com/forestideaswww.vimeo.com/forestideas
    11. 11. KNOW-FOR: IUCN investmentsin support of the Bonn ChallengeKey deliverables1. Production and uptake of newknowledge and analysis on keyeconomic, social and biophysicalopportunities for and constraints tolandscape restoration2. Development and testing of robustand easy-to-use tools to assist local,national and regional actors toidentify, negotiate, implement, andmonitor locally suited landscaperestoration strategies3. Strengthening capacity for scalingup landscape restoration efforts andinvestmentThematic focus1. Restoration as a vehicle for carbon-intensive land stewardship2. Land-use dynamics as acontribution to LR (farm fallow)3. Adaptation/mitigation synergiesthrough landscape restoration4. Links between water, water flowsand LR, including implications forurban areas5.Governance, institutional, monitoringarrangements for LR6. Models for private and publicsector investment in LR
    12. 12. KNOW-FOR: IUCN INVESTMENTS• Knowledge package on all 6 thematic areas• National restoration (includingeconomic, carbon) assessments• Assessment of revenue streams fromrestored landscapes• Decision-support framework to improveresilience of LR• Best practice guidance for negotiatingoutcomes and equitable trade-offs atlandscape scale• Peer review and early action support fornational and stakeholder commitments toBonn Challenge• Systematic pooling and dissemination ofanalysis, good practice and policy-relevantlessons: exchanges and online learning
    13. 13. A common framework forknowledge uptake and useHighlighting synergies betweenCIFOR, IUCN and PROFOR
    14. 14. For more information:DFID: G-allison@dfid.gov.ukIUCN: carole.saint-laurent@iucn.orgwww.iucn.org; www.forestlandscaperestoration.orgPROFOR: profor@worldbank.org; pdewees@worldbank.orgwww.profor.info; www.twitter.com/forestideas; www.vimeo.com/forestideasCIFOR: j.colmey@cgiar.orgcifor.org

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