Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

#ASTRO19 - Radiation Oncology Hashtag Project - September 16, 2019

208 views

Published on

Presented at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology Annual Meeting (#ASTRO19) and intended to help improve online communication about radiation oncology between oncologists, physicists, nurses, patients, and others working to improve cancer care.

This is an ongoing and evolving initiative and your input is very welcome!

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Be the first to comment

#ASTRO19 - Radiation Oncology Hashtag Project - September 16, 2019

  1. 1. PURPOSE RESULTS Thank you to the growing online radiation oncology community including nurses, therapists, physicists, biologists, and patients for participating in our surveys, providing valuable insights, and continuing to help patients, providers, and our healthcare systems. Also thanks to Symplur for hosting the structured hashtags. SUMMARY METHODS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Developing Radiation Oncology Hashtags to Improve Our Online Communication I. Pereira1, S. Turner2, S. Siva3, A. A. Albert4, D. A. Loblaw5, R. A. Simcock6, N. G. Zaorsky7, and M. S. Katz8; 1Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada, 2Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead, Australia, 3University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, 5Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, 6Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton, United Kingdom, 7Department of Radiation Oncology, Penn State Cancer Institute, Hershey, PA, 8Lowell General Hospital, Lowell, MA Table 1. The Radiation Oncology Structured Hashtags. The result of 23 independent reviewers across North America and Europe. Radiation drug combinations, medical physics, and women in radiation oncology hashtags lacked consensus. The surveyed #RadOnc community preferred #RTDrugCombo (20/33), #MedPhys (16/28), and #RadOncWomen (38/78). This list was uploaded to Symplur to allow analytics. Can a structured set of specialty-specific hashtags be developed to enhance our online communication? How do we maximize the benefit and minimize the harm of social media’s influence on health? Since 2007, hashtags have provided an effective way to categorize messages, search for content, and find relevant results (Fig. 2). They were once a tool only for the digital elite (nerds). Figure 1. *We evaluated published structured hashtags for oncology, pathology, radiology, urology, cardiology, & hematology **Experts were from professional societies and academic journals across North America, Europe, & Australia +Crowdsourcing was done through anonymous surveys delivered to the #RadOnc community using Twitter or SurveyMonkey ++Where possible we cross-referenced duplicate hashtags with active sources (e.g. from the Cancer Tag Ontology) Figure 2. Anatomy of a hashtag. Appending this metadata to a Twitter post allows chronologic retrieval by using it as a search term. Figure 3. Current state of hashtags. Total number of tweets and tweets/day from May 2014 to August 2019. Figure 4. #RadOnc network analysis. Interactions between Participants using the #RadOnc hashtag on Twitter from January to August 2019. Larger size nodes and thicker lines indicate more interaction and stronger connections. We now welcome those interested to learn and share around these key topics to use the relevant hashtag, increase the breadth of participation, and help each topic grow. Some hashtags already see frequent use (Fig. 3) and may be a good introduction for those new to Twitter. Radiation oncologists, institutions, and journals may also use a specific hashtag to create communities of interest and advocate for specific topics in cancer care similar to #RadOnc (Fig. 4). We anticipate this structured set of hashtags can be evaluated and tested in use with participants to better enhance professionalism, educate the public about radiation oncology, and curate more accurate health information online. We created the first structured set of radiation oncology hashtags for organized social media use. Staying Power: Low barriers to digital entry, reach across silos, and acceptance by the medical community has driven increasing use of social media by providers, patients, and industry. Openness: Platforms such as Twitter help close gaps in diversity and inclusion through medical education, patient support, research, and networking. Relevance: Near real-time insight on trends, wider peer review, more exchange of ideas including uncommon diagnoses, a larger audience for important topics such as clinical trials, and detailed analytics. Fake news: Anti-HPV vaccine myths, false complementary medicine claims, and propaganda against radiation and other conventional treatment limits public health, leads to worse outcomes, and increases costs. Privacy: Most social media platforms by design are easily accessible and have led to professional and ethical breaches. Productivity: Traditionally thought a time sink, increasingly populated with more data, and not a typical workshop or lecture hall. 0.001 0.01 0.1 1 10 100 1000 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 1000000 # Tweets Tweets/day @IanJPereira @sandraturner49 @_ShankarSiva @AshleyAlbertMD @DrAndrewLoblaw @BreastDocUK @NicholasZaorsky @subatomicdoc For the most recent radiation oncology structured hashtag list: www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ontology/radiation-oncology
  2. 2. Developing Radiation Oncology Hashtags to Improve Our Online Communication I. Pereira1, S. Turner2, S. Siva3, A. A. Albert4, D. A. Loblaw5, R. A. Simcock6, N. G. Zaorsky7, and M. S. Katz8; 1Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada, 2Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead, Australia, 3University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, 5Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, 6Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton, United Kingdom, 7Department of Radiation Oncology, Penn State Cancer Institute, Hershey, PA, 8Lowell General Hospital, Lowell, MA @IanJPereira @sandraturner49 @_ShankarSiva @AshleyAlbertMD @DrAndrewLoblaw @BreastDocUK @NicholasZaorsky @subatomicdoc For the most recent radiation oncology structured hashtag list: www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ontology/radiation-oncology
  3. 3. PURPOSE Can a structured set of specialty-specific hashtags be developed to enhance our online communication? How do we maximize the benefit and minimize the harm of social media’s influence on health? Since 2007, hashtags have provided an effective way to categorize messages, search for content, and find relevant results (Fig. 2). They were once a tool only for the digital elite (nerds). Fake news: Anti-HPV vaccine myths, false complementary medicine claims, and propaganda against radiation and other conventional treatment limits public health, leads to worse outcomes, and increases costs. Privacy: Most social media platforms by design are easily accessible and have led to professional and ethical breaches. Productivity: Traditionally thought a time sink, increasingly populated with more data, and not a typical workshop or lecture hall. Staying Power: Low barriers to digital entry, reach across silos, and acceptance by the medical community has driven increasing use of social media by providers, patients, and industry. Openness: Platforms such as Twitter help close gaps in diversity and inclusion through medical education, patient support, research, and networking. Relevance: Near real-time insight on trends, wider peer review, more exchange of ideas including uncommon diagnoses, a larger audience for important topics such as clinical trials, and detailed analytics. For the most recent radiation oncology structured hashtag list: www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ontology/radiation-oncology
  4. 4. Figure 2. Anatomy of a hashtag. Appending this metadata to a Twitter post allows chronologic retrieval by using it as a search term (#RadOnc). For the most recent radiation oncology structured hashtag list: www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ontology/radiation-oncology PURPOSE
  5. 5. METHODS Figure 1. *We evaluated published structured hashtags for oncology, pathology, radiology, urology, cardiology, & hematology **Experts were from professional societies and academic journals across North America, Europe, & Australia +Crowdsourcing was done through anonymous surveys delivered to the #RadOnc community using Twitter or SurveyMonkey ++Where possible we cross-referenced duplicate hashtags with active sources (e.g. from the Cancer Tag Ontology) For the most recent radiation oncology structured hashtag list: www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ontology/radiation-oncology
  6. 6. RESULTS Table 1. The Radiation Oncology Structured Hashtags. A result of 23 independent reviewers across North America & Europe. Radiation drug combinations, medical physics, & women in radiation oncology hashtags lacked consensus. The surveyed #RadOnc community preferred #RTDrugCombo (20/33), #MedPhys (16/28), & #RadOncWomen (38/78). This list was uploaded to Symplur to allow analytics. For the most recent radiation oncology structured hashtag list: www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ontology/radiation-oncology
  7. 7. RESULTS Figure 3. The current state of hashtags. Total number of tweets and tweets/day from May 2014 to August 2019. 0.001 0.01 0.1 1 10 100 1000 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 1000000 # Tweets Tweets/day For the most recent radiation oncology structured hashtag list: www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ontology/radiation-oncology
  8. 8. RESULTS Figure 4. #RadOnc network analysis. Interactions between Participants using the #RadOnc hashtag on Twitter from January to August 2019. Larger size nodes and thicker lines indicate more interaction and stronger connections. For the most recent radiation oncology structured hashtag list: www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ontology/radiation-oncology
  9. 9. SUMMARY We intend for this evolving list to improve our communication online. We created the first structured set of radiation oncology hashtags for organized social media use. We now welcome everyone interested in learning and sharing radiation oncology knowledge to use the relevant hashtag, increase the breadth of participation, and help each topic grow. Some hashtags already see frequent use (Fig. 3) and may be a good introduction for those new to Twitter. Radiation oncologists, institutions, and journals may also use a specific hashtag to create communities of interest and advocate for specific topics in cancer care similar to #RadOnc (Fig. 4). We anticipate this structured set of hashtags can be evaluated and tested with participants to better enhance professionalism, educate the public about radiation oncology, and curate more accurate health information online. For the most recent radiation oncology structured hashtag list: www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ontology/radiation-oncology
  10. 10. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Thank you to the growing online radiation oncology community including nurses, therapists, physicists, biologists, and patients for participating in our surveys, providing valuable insights, and continuing to help patients, providers, and our healthcare systems. Also, thanks to Symplur for hosting the structured hashtags. Find the most recent radiation oncology structured hashtag list here: www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ontology/radiation-oncology Finally, thank you to the ASTRO Organizing Committee for allowing us this invaluable opportunity to communicate IRL (in real life) to improve our communication in the digital world. For the most recent radiation oncology structured hashtag list: www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ontology/radiation-oncology
  11. 11. For the most recent radiation oncology structured hashtag list: www.symplur.com/healthcare-hashtags/ontology/radiation-oncology CONTACT US Please do not hesitate to reach out to us for comments, feedback, likes, retweets, or replies. We look forward to the online engagement. @IanJPereira @sandraturner49 @_ShankarSiva @AshleyAlbertMD @DrAndrewLoblaw @BreastDocUK @NicholasZaorsky @subatomicdoc

×