A look into mmorpg communities

569 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
569
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

A look into mmorpg communities

  1. 1. A LOOK INTO MMORPG COMMUNITIES By Cody Yong
  2. 2. • MMORPG Predecessors • Integration of social media • Incentives/motivation of play • Guilds and Parties • Idea of playing “Alone Together” • Tying it all together OUTLINE
  3. 3. • MUD – Multi-User Dungeon – Text based gameplay – Online chat • RPG – Role-Playing Game – Interact with NPC’s to follow a narrative • Both hold emphasis on character development. PREDECESSORS
  4. 4. • MUD + RPG = MMORPG • Avatar – customizable character/persona • Online Chat (private messaging, shout, friends list) • Still interact with many NPC’s, but a high reliance is placed on other users – LFP, WTS, WTB, LFG, WTF…? INTEGRATION OF SOCIAL MEDIA
  5. 5. • There are no final victory or loss conditions – Therefore the game continues to evolve • “Emotional proximity” for their avatar • Although there is a single background narrative, the player is allowed to interact with the environment and help shape the game. Dickey (2007) INCENTIVES/MOTIVATION OF PLAY (GAME SIDE)
  6. 6. • Shared experience with others • Role-Playing concept • Collaborative nature of in-game activities • Most importantly, the reward of being socialized into a community of gamers and acquiring a reputation within it. Ducheneaut, Yee, Nickell, Moore (2007) INCENTIVES/MOTIVATION OF PLAY (SOCIAL SIDE)
  7. 7. • A way to cumulate in-game social capital. – Guild mates function as weak ties typically • Many aspects of an MMORPG require/encourage Guilds and/or Parties. – Difficulty of level – Class variety – GvG • Social pressure to play presented by guild. GUILDS AND PARTIES
  8. 8. Ducheneaut, Yee, Nickell &Moore (2007)
  9. 9. • Players seem to play surrounded by others, instead of playing with them. • Background chatter supplies a sense of social presence. – Player can input at anytime. • Other players provide an audience and a sort of spectacle. Ducheneaut, Yee, Nickell, Moore (2007) NOT THAT SOCIAL? WHY NOT PLAY “ALONE TOGETHER?”
  10. 10. Seay, Jerome, Lee, & Kraut (2004) TYING IT ALL TOGETHER
  11. 11. • Social aspects of an MMORPG are nearly unavoidable. • The game itself helps facilitate and encourages social interaction. • “community of practice” (Bogost 2007) TYING IT ALL TOGETHER (CONT’D)

×