Volunteering in your own country part 3

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Volunteering in your own country part 3

  1. 1. +Part 3Volunteering inyour Country
  2. 2. +Good Practice for Managing Volunteers Devise mini-projects with a definite life-span Prepare tailored job descriptions for recruitment of volunteers Take into account the volunteer’s requirements as well as the institution Evaluate the extent to which volunteers can be offered training and, insome cases, responsibility Make sure relevant staff members are are available for shadowing andsupervision Log what volunteers do and the hours they commit (e.g. via a signing inbook) Evaluate volunteer performance through written reports and formalmeetings Outline any training needs and assess the contribution of volunteers
  3. 3. +What should institutions offer theirvolunteers? The opportunity to contribute Induction and training sessions A manageable workload and appropriate responsibility A sense of belonging and appreciation Confidentiality of personal information Insurance within the workplace Refund expenses incurred for transport and food (often dependentupon number of hours worked)
  4. 4. +Legal Obligations for Institutions Reimbursement Health and Safety Insurance: Data Protection Copyright Complaint’s Procedure Risk Assessment‘Volunteers: Your Legal Obligations’ Museum Practice, November 2010:http://www.museumsassociation.org/museum-practice/volunteers/15112010-volunteers-legal-obligations
  5. 5. +Working with Volunteers –adhering to UK LegislationInstitutions must consider the following UKlegislation when recruiting and working withvolunteersEqual Opportunities PolicyHealth and Safety at Work Act 1974Children Act 1989Disability Discrimination Act 1995
  6. 6. +Volunteering Online –Crowdsourcing ProjectsWhat is crowdsourcing?‘The act of taking a job traditionally performed bya designated agent (usually an employee) andoutsourcing it to an undefined, generally largegroup of people in the form of an open call’Jeff Howe, Wired Magazine
  7. 7. +Types of Crowdsourcing Projectsfacilitated by Cultural Institutions Correction and Transcription: E.g. correcting and/or transcribing outputsof digitisation Contextualisation: E.g. adding contextual knowledge to objects Complementing Collections: E.g. pursuing objects to be included in anexhibit or collection Classification: E.g. gathering descriptive metadata related to the objectsin a collection Co-curation: E.g. collaborating with non -museum professionals to createexhibits Crowdfunding: E.g. pooling money and other resources together tosupport efforts initiated by others(Oomen, J. Aroyo, L. (2011) Crowdsourcing in the Cultural Heritage Domain: Opportunities and Challenges)
  8. 8. +Examples of Successful Online VolunteeringProjects in Cultural InstitutionsWhat different types of crowdsourcing arereflected in the following examples? Old Weather (National Maritime Museum, National Archivesetc.) http://www.oldweather.org UK Soundmap (British Library) http://sounds.bl.uk/Sound-Maps/UK-Soundmap What’s on the Menu? (New York Public Library)http://menus.nypl.org Citizen Archivist (American National Archives)http://www.archives.gov/citizen-archivist/

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