Value from waste – Converting a
problem into a resource
Jeremy Bird, IWMI
Modified from Rockström et al. (2009)
Planetary boundaries
High time for
Resource Recovery
and Reuse!
What if urban wastes and used water could
have a second life in agriculture and the
reuse is actually safe and viable?
Where there's muck
there's money
• In many cultures, wastewater reuse and waste composting have a
long tradition, at least...
The concept is simple, at least for rural
households
Source: Wikipedia inspired by Peter Morgan
It is not that simple in our urbanizing world
www. Vimeo.com/25122496
This means first of all transport COSTS
between source and reuse
Atmosphere
Peri-urban
agriculture
Urban
agriculture
Saw-mills
Breweries
Poultry farms
Transport/
Distribution
Landfill
Fer...
Thus, for converting our larger urban waste
problems into a resource, we need strategic
partnerships and have to apply rob...
Resource Recovery & Reuse (RRR)
A research flagship of CGIAR-WLE
Current Status of RRR program after 18 months
 Database of 150+ inspiring RRR business cases
 Selection of 60 cases for ...
Example of a business model currently being implemented
in Ghana as a Private Public Partnership :
Fecal Sludge Valorizati...
Value from waste – converting a problem into a resource
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Value from waste – converting a problem into a resource

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Presented by Jeremy Bird, IWMI, for the Laureate Seminar during World Water Week in Stockholm on 5th September 2013.

Published in: Business, Technology

Value from waste – converting a problem into a resource

  1. 1. Value from waste – Converting a problem into a resource Jeremy Bird, IWMI
  2. 2. Modified from Rockström et al. (2009) Planetary boundaries High time for Resource Recovery and Reuse!
  3. 3. What if urban wastes and used water could have a second life in agriculture and the reuse is actually safe and viable?
  4. 4. Where there's muck there's money • In many cultures, wastewater reuse and waste composting have a long tradition, at least at household level. • The technical knowledge is available. • It is an apparent win-win situation for the sanitation, environmental and agricultural sectors. • Why is there no large compost plant or wastewater reuse project in every southern city?
  5. 5. The concept is simple, at least for rural households Source: Wikipedia inspired by Peter Morgan
  6. 6. It is not that simple in our urbanizing world
  7. 7. www. Vimeo.com/25122496 This means first of all transport COSTS between source and reuse
  8. 8. Atmosphere Peri-urban agriculture Urban agriculture Saw-mills Breweries Poultry farms Transport/ Distribution Landfill Fertilizer 1 Fertilizer 2 Food 1 Food 2 Food 3 Consumer products 1 Compost 1 SW10 Excreta3 SW3 SW5 SW9 SW 11 SW12 Excreta1 WW1 Gas3 WW2 BS 1 Raw material SW 13 Food 4 Consumer products 2 Compost 2 System border Industry Excreta 2Wood1 Wood2 120 1150 13 3200 1700 3200 680 43 230 80 4750 230 530 1010 130 830 220 640 2500 15 90 530 700 <10 18 530 Air1 Air2 Gas5 Gas6 Gas7 400 85 <10 <10 560 Gas1 Gas2 1000 30 <10 Soil SW2 640 Leachate1 50 Leachate2 110 WW3 150 SW6 SW8 7 130 Co-composting Household Treatment of excreta Scenario 1 Groundwater and surface waters city level N t/yr Source:SANDEC/EAWAG It looks easy But in a city it looks more like this:
  9. 9. Thus, for converting our larger urban waste problems into a resource, we need strategic partnerships and have to apply robust economics and business modeling.
  10. 10. Resource Recovery & Reuse (RRR) A research flagship of CGIAR-WLE
  11. 11. Current Status of RRR program after 18 months  Database of 150+ inspiring RRR business cases  Selection of 60 cases for in-depth analysis (see map)  So far 20 promising business models extracted  Feasibility studies of models starting in 9 cities (map)  Business model implementation targeting 5 cities
  12. 12. Example of a business model currently being implemented in Ghana as a Private Public Partnership : Fecal Sludge Valorization

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