Regional water governance benchmarking project lessons from jordan and turkey

1,573 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,573
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
21
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Regional water governance benchmarking project lessons from jordan and turkey

  1. 1. Lessons from Jordan and Turkey Regional Water Governance Benchmarking Project Jonathan Lautze 1 , Mark Giordano 1 and Ra’ed Daoud 2 Stockholm Water Week August 2009 1:IWMI, 2: ECO Consult
  2. 2. <ul><li>Discuss some issues related to water governance in Jordan (Ra’ed) </li></ul><ul><li>Applying ReWaB benchmarking approach: Explain methods and some results from Jordan and Turkey (Lautze) </li></ul><ul><li>Does this approach capture conditions, & what are opportunities and constraints ? (Giordano) </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion </li></ul>Presentation Overview
  3. 3. Examples from Jordan <ul><li>Water pollution - Manshiyet Bani Hassan (Mafraq) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The way of solving the problem </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who participated in solving the problem </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Response time, serve customers, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>what substitute they have </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who was accountable to the public, is there </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>kind of carelessness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Was solving the problem (procedure) been </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>according to the rule of law </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information declared to the public </li></ul></ul>Photo Credit: Tamer Assad, ECO Consult Photo Credit: Tamer Assad, ECO Consult
  4. 4. <ul><ul><ul><li>Examples from Jordan </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>New Water Strategy v. Water Strategy and Policies of 1998 </li></ul><ul><li>Royal committee members from different stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>Drafts reviewed by many different stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>Workshops for discussion and developing action plan </li></ul><ul><li>Water strategy and policies of 1998 was almost developed internally by MWI </li></ul>Source: www.idrc.ca
  5. 5. Examples from Jordan <ul><li>Selecting the WWTP 1 location (South Amman) </li></ul><ul><li>Water sector restructuring </li></ul><ul><li>Private sector involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Water Users Associations in Jordan Valley </li></ul><ul><li>Disi water conveyance project </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Execution form: BOT 2 , government, DBO 3 , etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Financing issue </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Water quality information </li></ul></ul><ul><li>New Red Sea Dead Sea project (Declared in the World Economic Forum recently) </li></ul>WWTP 1 : Wastewater treatment plant BOT 2 : Build, Operate, Transfer DBO 3 : Design, Build, Operate
  6. 6. Examples from Jordan <ul><li>Karama Dam </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One solution was to wash the dam for some years </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other to build a desalination </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Was all information declared? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extensive debates about the project, who was responsible? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How decision taken to proceed with the project? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>After 12 years, limited benefits of the project </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deputies called for sending its file to the prosecutor general for investigation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>how liable party was identified? Who was accountable? </li></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Assessing Water Governance <ul><li>4 days of workshops, 27 people, Kempinski hotel, Amman </li></ul><ul><li>Participants came from different organizations </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Min of Water, Min of Environment, Universities, NGOs, private sector </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Two main exercises, one focused on water governance processes, one focused on water sector functions </li></ul><ul><li>Group work utilized to arrive at responses </li></ul>
  8. 8. Processes & Functions Source: Brown, B et al. “MENA Regional Water Governance Benchmarking Project, Concept and Approach Framework Part 1,” Third draft. USAID Regional Water Governance Benchmarking in the Middle East North Africa Region. Ed. Mark Svendsen.2009. IRG. < http://www.rewab.net/files/Water%20Governance%20Concept%20and%20Framework%20%28Part%20I%29%20V4.pdf> June 10,2010 Transparency Participation Accountability & Integrity Responsiveness Process Features Organizing & Building Capacity Planning Strategically Allocating Water Developing & Managing Water Resources Regulating Water Resources & Services Functions Rule of Law
  9. 9. <ul><li>Methods </li></ul>1. To satisfy increased drinking water demand, there are options to increase use of surface water, groundwater and desalinated water. There are also options to increase efficiency of water use. Key decisions must be made in selecting the appropriate mix of these and other options. Source: http://www.rewab.net/files/Water%20Governance%20Concept%20and%20Framework%20%28Part%20I%29%20V4.pdf Source: Brown, B et al. “MENA Regional Water Governance Benchmarking Project, Concept and Approach Framework Part 1,” Third draft. USAID Regional Water Governance Benchmarking in the Middle East North Africa Region. Ed. Mark Svendsen.2009. IRG. < http://www.rewab.net/files/Water%20Governance%20Concept%20and%20Framework%20%28Part%20I%29%20V4.pdf> June 10,2010 How participative are decisions for selecting the best mix of options to satisfy increased drinking water demand? How transparent are decisions for selecting the best mix of options to satisfy increased drinking water demand? How much integrity/accountability in decisions for selecting the best mix of options to satisfy increased drinking water demand? To what degree do decisions for selecting the best mix of options to satisfy increased drinking water demand follow the rule of law ? How responsive are these decisions to changes in demand and other new circumstances?
  10. 10. <ul><li>Processes </li></ul><ul><li>Asked participants to assess the strength of processes for five common challenges to our focal countries: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Satisfying drinking water demand </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reducing GW (over)abstraction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Balancing rural-urban needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Balancing up-downstream needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allocating re-used wastewater </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Methods </li></ul>Source: Fieldwork Protocol, http://www.rewab.net/files/ReWaB%20Fieldwork%20Protocol%20final.pdf Source: Brown, B et al. “MENA Regional Water Governance Benchmarking Project, Concept and Approach Framework Part 1,” Third draft. USAID Regional Water Governance Benchmarking in the Middle East North Africa Region. Ed. Mark Svendsen.2009. IRG. < http://www.rewab.net/files/Water%20Governance%20Concept%20and%20Framework%20%28Part%20I%29%20V4.pdf> June 10,2010
  12. 12. <ul><li>Functions </li></ul><ul><li>Participants assessed the extent to which key organizations were involved in carry out standard water resources functions </li></ul><ul><li>Also asked to assess how effectively they collectively carry out these functions </li></ul><ul><li>1-5 rating system </li></ul><ul><li>Group work </li></ul>
  13. 13. <ul><li>Results from Jordan (Processes) </li></ul>Source: Preliminary results, REWAB Project, USAID-OMEP
  14. 14. <ul><li>Results from Turkey (O&F matrix) </li></ul>Source: Brown, B et al. “MENA Regional Water Governance Benchmarking Project, Concept and Approach Framework Part 1,” Third draft. USAID Regional Water Governance Benchmarking in the Middle East North Africa Region. Ed. Mark Svendsen.2009. IRG. < http://www.rewab.net/files/Water%20Governance%20Concept%20and%20Framework%20%28Part%20I%29%20V4.pdf> June 10,2010
  15. 15. What does this suggest ? <ul><li>Governance processes appear strongest with re-used wastewater </li></ul><ul><li>Integrity not strong in reducing groundwater table decline </li></ul><ul><li>Little participation in transferring water to Amman from rural areas </li></ul><ul><li>More organizations participate in planning than allocating water </li></ul><ul><ul><li>effectiveness scores suggest more is better </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Nonetheless, centrist tendency in responses </li></ul>
  16. 16. Constraints, Opportunities, Broader Context <ul><li>Selection of Participants </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges with lack of understanding, or with confused understanding about what water governance means </li></ul><ul><li>Complex concept: difficult to explain in 1 day or even 1 week </li></ul><ul><li>Need additional countries to test comparability (anchoring) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>But are there motivational issues with doing this many exercises? </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Some bigger picture issues <ul><li>The political economy context: When is it appropriate to examine just water governance? </li></ul><ul><li>Levels of governance: National, regional, local </li></ul><ul><li>Scale of governance: National versus basin versus … </li></ul><ul><li>Local relevance versus international comparison </li></ul>
  18. 18. Local Relevance versus International Comparability <ul><li>Centrist tendency in responses might be explained by the general nature of questions </li></ul><ul><li>But general nature of questions is almost inherent in questions applicable across a range of countries </li></ul><ul><li>How to produce questions that elicit strong responses yet are applicable across range of countries? </li></ul>
  19. 19. An important initial step <ul><li>Despite drawbacks, this work is important step to assessing water governance </li></ul><ul><li>Much can be taken from this; important opportunity to build on it </li></ul><ul><li>Work on this project has highlighted that much greater clarity is needed in defining and using “water governance” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Clarity means less words, not more </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. For more information visit: www.rewab.net <ul><li>Thank you! </li></ul>

×