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Policy questions on migration, rural transformation and water resources management in Sub Saharan Africa

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Presented by IWMI's Alan Nicol at the 2016 Stockholm World Water Week, in Stockholm, Sweden, on August 29, 2016. At the session on "Migration and water management: Lessons for policy and practice".

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Policy questions on migration, rural transformation and water resources management in Sub Saharan Africa

  1. 1. Policy questions on migration, rural transformation and water resources management in Sub-Saharan Africa Dr Alan Nicol, IWMI
  2. 2. Scale • Demographic shifts • Employment challenges • Cash economies – migration options • Water scarcity / climate change are not the core drivers • Key Issues – Rural-urban outmigration – Uganda – half the population 15 or younger – Youth migration – Implications for the demographic transition • where people work • how they manage resources • What they choose to invest in
  3. 3. Implications • Remittances: 2013 (official inflows) $33.2 billion / ODA $46.8 (World Bank 2016, Migration and Remittances) • Substantial inflows – E.g. Liberia 24.6% (GDP); lower proportion, larger absolutes • Nigeria ($21bn) • Ghana ($2bn) • Kenya ($1.6bn) • Uganda ($0.9bn) – Unofficial far higher • Key Issues – Gender-disaggregation of data – Origins of migrants / feedback loops • 75% of poor and food insecure live in rural areas • Where are remittances going / what are they used for? – Youth as drivers of change • Land ownership, catchment management • Policy agendas on water-smart agriculture, climate-smart agriculture, sustainable intensification • Rural-urban linkages
  4. 4. (some) key follow-up questions • What is understood/misunderstood about migration and land-water-energy developments? • What could a typology of migration tell us? • What are the goals and policy implications of ‘doing more’ for migrants (and communities)? • What might an integrated migration and development policy look like in practice? (economic, social protection, financial policy, resource governance, legal instruments, etc…)

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