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Are MUS more sustainable than single-use systems?
Floriane Clement, IWMI
Paras Pokhrel, Water Aid
INTERNATIONAL MUS
WORKSH...
Introduction
Farmer managed water systems
High sustainability and resilience
Respond to multiple needs
ARE MUS MORE SUSTAI...
Definitions
• RESILIENCE: “Capacity of a system to experience
shocks while retaining function, structure and
feedback capa...
Framework of analysis for social-
ecological systems
Water source
Water user committee
Physical condition
and rules for O&...
Methodology
• Case study programme: SIMI
• Rapid appraisal of 16 MUS
• Case study of 2 MUS
• Syangja, Kaski, Palpa
• June ...
• Benefits: Time saved,
enhanced diet and knowledge
• Average annual household
income: NPR 13,722 (USD 136)
• Who controls...
Sustainability indicators
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
No of
MUS
Physical
condition
InstitutionsSourceEquity Performance
Sustainability and resilience
assessment
• Most systems are still functional (87.5%)
• Security of the source of water is ...
LUMLE-I, KASKI
Photos: Ramesh Tamang / IWMI
BHANDAREKHOLA, SYANGJA
Photos: Ramesh Tamang / IWMI
Pre-existing factors affecting
cooperation
• Characteristics of the
resource: Sufficient flow of
water throughout the year...
Addressing inequities and supporting
cooperation
• Technology: Increased storage
and taps has allowed a fair
allocation an...
Providing multiple services
• Basic needs: improved for
all users, covered all year
round
• Economic returns: for a
large ...
Conclusion
• The ‘multiple’ of MUS matters
but is not sufficient !
• ‘Multiple’ needs careful inter-
community planning
• ...
Recommendations
• Feasibility study:
– Consider level of trust/reciprocity and existing
conflicts
– Comprehensive assessme...
THANK YOU
Photo: Ramesh Tamang / IWMI
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Are MUS more sustainable than single-use systems?

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Presented by IWMI's Floriane Clement at the International Workshop on Multiple Use Water Systems (MUS) for Climate Resilience, in Kathmandu, Nepal.
25-26 Feb 2016

Published in: Environment
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Are MUS more sustainable than single-use systems?

  1. 1. Are MUS more sustainable than single-use systems? Floriane Clement, IWMI Paras Pokhrel, Water Aid INTERNATIONAL MUS WORKSHOP KATHMANDU, 25-26 Feb 2016 Photo: Ramesh Tamang / IWMI
  2. 2. Introduction Farmer managed water systems High sustainability and resilience Respond to multiple needs ARE MUS MORE SUSTAINABLE AND RESILIENT THAN SINGLE-USE SYSTEMS? WHY? External water interventions Low sustainability and resilience Designed as single-use systems Photos: Ramesh Tamang / IWMI
  3. 3. Definitions • RESILIENCE: “Capacity of a system to experience shocks while retaining function, structure and feedback capabilities” (Redman, 2014) • SUSTAINABILITY: “The capability of maintaining over indefinite periods of time specified qualities of human well-being, social equity and environmental integrity” (Leach et al., 2010)
  4. 4. Framework of analysis for social- ecological systems Water source Water user committee Physical condition and rules for O&M Quantity and quality of water for drinking and irrigation From Anderies et al., 2004
  5. 5. Methodology • Case study programme: SIMI • Rapid appraisal of 16 MUS • Case study of 2 MUS • Syangja, Kaski, Palpa • June – August 2014 Study findings to inform MAWTW project, Feed the Future initiative and food security programmes in general Photos: Ramesh Tamang / IWMI
  6. 6. • Benefits: Time saved, enhanced diet and knowledge • Average annual household income: NPR 13,722 (USD 136) • Who controls income: Women (58%), men (33%), both (8%) • Income used for: household expenses, education and health • CB ratio: 11 • 0.7 year return period Contribution to well-being Photo: Ramesh Tamang / IWMI
  7. 7. Sustainability indicators 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 No of MUS Physical condition InstitutionsSourceEquity Performance
  8. 8. Sustainability and resilience assessment • Most systems are still functional (87.5%) • Security of the source of water is the biggest issue for sustainability/resilience • Our sustainability assessment matches with farmers’ resilient assessment • All sustainable/resilient systems are governed by formal institutions
  9. 9. LUMLE-I, KASKI Photos: Ramesh Tamang / IWMI
  10. 10. BHANDAREKHOLA, SYANGJA Photos: Ramesh Tamang / IWMI
  11. 11. Pre-existing factors affecting cooperation • Characteristics of the resource: Sufficient flow of water throughout the year • Characteristics of the infrastructure: Relatively compact settlement • Characteristics of the water users: Small group and good social cohesion. Homogeneity (size of bari land and use of water). High financial capacity. • Characteristics of the resource: Decline in water flow • Characteristics of the infrastructure: spread settlement, steep terrain; • Characteristics of the resource users: Lack of social cohesion; Water use is heterogeneous LUMLE I BHANDAREKHOLA
  12. 12. Addressing inequities and supporting cooperation • Technology: Increased storage and taps has allowed a fair allocation and increased equity • Institutions: Simple set of institutions is sufficient LUMLE I BHANDAREKHOLA • Technology: Increased storage has not addressed inequity in water allocation for the overall system • Institutions: Ineffective and not functional
  13. 13. Providing multiple services • Basic needs: improved for all users, covered all year round • Economic returns: for a large share of users LUMLE I BHANDAREKHOLA • Basic needs: some users face shortage during the dry season • Economic returns: for a small share of users
  14. 14. Conclusion • The ‘multiple’ of MUS matters but is not sufficient ! • ‘Multiple’ needs careful inter- community planning • Need to consider social and gender equity in how this ‘multiplicity’ is distributed Photo: Ramesh Tamang / IWMI
  15. 15. Recommendations • Feasibility study: – Consider level of trust/reciprocity and existing conflicts – Comprehensive assessment of water demand and supply beyond the targeted community • Social survey on existing/potential inequities and recommendations for technological intervention and institutional support
  16. 16. THANK YOU Photo: Ramesh Tamang / IWMI

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