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IT-Shape 6. Newsletter

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2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615
it-shape.hu
NEWSLETTER
6. issue November 2014
Page 1 of 10
This project has been funded with suppor...

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2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615
it-shape.hu
NEWSLETTER
6. issue November 2014
Page 2 of 10
This project has been funded with suppor...

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2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615
it-shape.hu
NEWSLETTER
6. issue November 2014
Page 3 of 10
This project has been funded with suppor...

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IT-Shape 6. Newsletter

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Introducing and implementing the EUCIP Core training programme can only be efficient and successful if young professionals completing the training have a chance to be employed not only in Europe but also in Hungary. In the framework of the I-TShape project, the Pest County Foundation for Enterprise Promotion (PFEP) undertook to survey Hungarian stakeholders of the economy to assess the infrastructural background of various businesses, the status of this infrastructure, the conditions of its operation and the expectations towards professionals who operate and develop it. The results and conclusions of the survey are important for us, as we can use them in designing a training programme tailored to the needs of the Hungarian market demands that and then integrating it into the vocational training system in Hungary.

Introducing and implementing the EUCIP Core training programme can only be efficient and successful if young professionals completing the training have a chance to be employed not only in Europe but also in Hungary. In the framework of the I-TShape project, the Pest County Foundation for Enterprise Promotion (PFEP) undertook to survey Hungarian stakeholders of the economy to assess the infrastructural background of various businesses, the status of this infrastructure, the conditions of its operation and the expectations towards professionals who operate and develop it. The results and conclusions of the survey are important for us, as we can use them in designing a training programme tailored to the needs of the Hungarian market demands that and then integrating it into the vocational training system in Hungary.

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IT-Shape 6. Newsletter

  1. 1. 2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615 it-shape.hu NEWSLETTER 6. issue November 2014 Page 1 of 10 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Welcome Demand for e-skills has been growing steadily during the last years all over the world. According to the study published in the frame of European e-Skills Forum: “e-Skills shortages will result in an excess demand of 384.000 ICT practitioners in 2015.” (Körte, W. B., Hüsing T.: Evaluation of the Implementation of the EC's Communication on "e-Skills for the 21st Century", Empirica, Bonn). An important conclusion of related studies was, that European companies "were increasingly struggling to hire people who were competent in both information technology and business management. Companies need so called "T- Shaped" professionals who enter the workforce with a strong business understanding, ‘soft’ skills and knowledge of leading-edge technology.” (Fonstad, N., Lanivyn, B.: European e- Competence Curricula development guidelines, Final Reports, European Commission, European e-Skills Forum, 2010). EUCIP Core - at European level recognized IT qualification - is an answer exactly to this demand as its competence framework strongly focuses on the business skills related to the fundamental e-skills. The certificate was established by CEPIS (Council of European Professional Informatics Societies) and has been used with success already in seven European countries. IT-Shape project aims to adapt EUCIP Core certificate in the Hungarian Vocational Education. The main impact of the project are the increased chances of Hungarian (young and adult) people getting their placement at enterprises, by offering them internationally recognized, true pan-European IT qualification. I-T Shape Consortium Table of Content Welcome.............................................................. 1 Results and Conclusions of the Survey Related to the EUCIP Core Training among Economic Stakeholders ........................................................ 2 Events .................................................................. 9 2inno.eu – „Do innovation now!” LLP Project.... 9 Project basics....................................................... 9 Partnership ........................................................ 10 Target groups..................................................... 10 Objectives .......................................................... 10 Work-packages .................................................. 10 This issue was published by: P9 PMVA, Hungary Editor: Dr. Gábor Bujáki Copyright © IT-Shape Consortium
  2. 2. 2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615 it-shape.hu NEWSLETTER 6. issue November 2014 Page 2 of 10 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Results and Conclusions of the Survey Related to the EUCIP Core Training among Economic Stakeholders Introducing and implementing the EUCIP Core training programme can only be efficient and successful if young professionals completing the training have a chance to be employed not only in Europe but also in Hungary. In the framework of the I-TShape project, the Pest County Foundation for Enterprise Promotion (PFEP) undertook to survey Hungarian stakeholders of the economy to assess the infrastructural background of various businesses, the status of this infrastructure, the conditions of its operation and the expectations towards professionals who operate and develop it. The results and conclusions of the survey are important for us, as we can use them in designing a training programme tailored to the needs of the Hungarian market demands that and then integrating it into the vocational training system in Hungary. The survey used a questionnaire with 15 questions. Respondents could fill in the survey online, on a voluntarily basis and anonymously. The survey was sent out to the regular contacts of the PFEP, corresponding to more than 600 organisations. Less than 10% of them (56 respondents) filled in the questionnaire yet we think we could collect useful information and opinions that can be relied on when designing the training programme. Questions in the first part of the questionnaire, questions were supposed to facilitate the interpretation and evaluation of those related to professional issues. Questions were related to the legal form of the organisation, number of staff, economic sector and scope of the activities as well as the position, age and gender of the responding person as these latter factors may bias the attitude of respondents. One third of the participants were women and two thirds men. This ratio is considered ”favourable” regarding today’s „masculine” trends in the composition of top management, in the IT sector in particular. More than 70% of respondents held positions in the top management (chief executives, business managers, marketing directors, IT directors, managing directors, heads of sales, heads of financing, etc.). From the respondents, 52% were older than 50, 45% fell into the age group of 30-50 and only 5% were younger than 30. The distribution of responding organisations regarding business sectors approached the typical sectorial distribution of companies in Hungary (see the graph below). Fig. 1. Sectorial distribution of responding organisations 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Commerce Construction industry Education Agriculture Industry Real estate bussines Health and social services Catering and accomodation Processing industry
  3. 3. 2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615 it-shape.hu NEWSLETTER 6. issue November 2014 Page 3 of 10 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. The distribution according to number of staff of Hungarian businesses is also well represented by respondents. More than 95% of the participants belonged to the group of micro enterprises and SMEs and less than 5% were big companies. Fig. 2.Distribution of respondents according to number of staff Assessing the IT infrastructure of organisations, the activities where such tools and structures were used and the method of use were considered important. As illustrated by Fig. 3, more than 70% of the respondents applied PCs and had internet connection; more than 60% used networks of peripherals. However, less than 50% of the participants used PCs in a connected setup (network), while only 10% of the respondents had intranet and operated web servers. Fig. 3. IT infrastructure at the responding organisations. We also wanted to collect information on the current status of existing IT tools and equipment. Our impressions here are actually quite positive; more than 70% of the organisations modernised their hardware and software stock within the last 3 years. According to our results, the existing IT infrastructure is typically used for administration (82%). About 50% of the respondents used software packages for finances, accounting and payroll calculations, customer and client registry, document management and maintaining registries. Unfortunately, IT systems are not widely 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 0-9 fő 10-49 fő 50-249 fő 250 fő felett 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% PCs for individual users Internet Printer, scanner, fax, etc. Connected to the same… WLAN PC netvork Network server, also available for saving data LAN Network database server Intranet WEB server
  4. 4. 2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615 it-shape.hu NEWSLETTER 6. issue November 2014 Page 4 of 10 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. used yet in high level company processes such as designing and controlling production and manufacturing, human resource management, project management, logistics, PR, marketing and quality assurance. In these fields, the rate of IT users was below 20%. The use of integrated company management systems was reported in less than 10% of the cases. Fig. 4. Fields of IT use. Regarding the importance of IT tools and technology in operating and developing organisations, 63% considered it very important or essential, 34% said IT applications facilitate daily work and only 3% thought IT use had only minimum effect on their work. We also asked the participants about the actual solutions regarding system administration and other IT tasks, i.e. whether they employ professionals for the purpose or hire subcontractors and what qualifications they set as criteria for performing such tasks. One fifth of the respondents employ full time IT experts and about 30% hire subcontractors to perform IT tasks with long term contract or on a case by case basis. Fig. 5. Solutions regarding system administration and other IT tasks . 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Administration Finances Accounting, payroll calculation Customer and client registration Documenting, archiving, registry Purchase and sales Education and training Project management PR, marketing Planning, controlling and developing manufacture… Quality management HR management Logistics Integrated company management 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% Part time IT expert Full time IT expert Tasks performed by someone in another position Subcontractor with long-term contract Subcontractors contracted on a case by case basis
  5. 5. 2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615 it-shape.hu NEWSLETTER 6. issue November 2014 Page 5 of 10 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. As Fig. 6 shows, system administration and other IT tasks are performed by people with specialised college degrees at about 60% of the respondents. In about 30% of the cases, the experts performing these tasks have special secondary qualifications. At one fifth of the organisations, the employed IT experts do not have relevant degrees. Fig. 6. Distribution of people performing IT tasks at the participating companies according to their qualification. According to the results of the survey, participants employ IT experts to facilitate the operation of users’ PCs and mailing systems and to manage web pages. Subcontractors are typically hired to develop software tools or web pages or to provide web server or storage services. Network servers and systems are operated by employees and subcontractors in about 50-50%, respectively; the same applies to regular hardware and software maintenance, backup tasks and IT development. 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Non-specialised intermediate Specialised intermediate Vocational qualification registered in the National Qualification Registry (OKJ) Specialised college or university degree Non-specialised college or university degree
  6. 6. 2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615 it-shape.hu NEWSLETTER 6. issue November 2014 Page 6 of 10 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Fig. 7. Distribution of IT tasks between employees and subcontractors. Our most important question regarding the EUCIP Core training programme was related to the importance participants gave to the knowledge, abilities, skills and competences listed by us in relation to IT experts. According to the results, 80% of respondents think it to be essential for IT experts to be familiar with modern IT tools, technologies and should be able to install, use, operate and maintain these. Being aware of the relevant legal and ethical aspects is considered almost as important. The rate of those who expect IT experts to make recommendations IT developments to support particular operation processes is lower (67%). Competences beyond the strictly professional ones with special regard to English as a language for special purposes as well as independence and problem solving are considered important or essential by 80%. 41 21 21 22 36 5 17 14 26 13 13 21 21 11 20 26 25 8 34 22 26 13 26 24 15 15 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%100% Facilitate the operation of users’ PCs Operate servers Operate networks, supervise network security Hardware and software maintenance, regular backups for data and programmes Operate email system; creation and administration of mailing lists Software development Development of IT infrastructure Web page development Content management for the operating web pages Hosting service Operate the server for web contents and provide access Prepare applications for IT infrastructure and other development projects Prepare and implement IT infrastructure and other development projects employee subcontractor
  7. 7. 2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615 it-shape.hu NEWSLETTER 6. issue November 2014 Page 7 of 10 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Fig. 8. Evaluation of knowledge, skills and competences expected from IT experts. The questionnaire also included a part where participants could make comments or recommendations regarding the training programme. From these comments, the following were considered particularly useful:  The training should focus on practical solutions and include personal motivation exercises. 1 1 1 1 3 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 1 4 1 7 2 4 3 5 4 4 3 1 2 2 9 7 8 10 12 12 7 11 8 10 11 8 6 9 18 15 17 20 18 21 23 22 22 23 19 10 15 17 27 29 29 18 21 18 23 18 22 17 22 36 33 27 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Should be familiar with modern IC tools, technologies and should be able to install, use, operate and… Should be familiar with the operation of various systems and should be able to install and safely… Should be able to define, develop and test the specifications of IT systems used at the organisation. Should be aware of the importance of IT investments and should be able to assess their feasibility Should be aware of the importance of innovation and the challenges of supporting innovation Should know the legal and ethical aspects of using IT systems Should know and understand the objectives, strategies, operation and business processes of the… Language skills (esp. English) Team work Good written and oral communication skills Creativity Independence, problem solving ability Loyalty, ability to compromise 1 2 3 4 5
  8. 8. 2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615 it-shape.hu NEWSLETTER 6. issue November 2014 Page 8 of 10 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.  Typically, IT experts can either assist in developing own software solutions or in the application of generally available software packages. Experts who have the field specific knowledge and are able to provide advice in finding customised alternatives of commercially available packages are missing.  The training should be held in English.  The training programme should be designed in a way that it can be later incorporated into higher education, as part of the curriculum for college degrees or second degrees. We may summarise the results and experiences of the survey as follows (conclusions are obviously not inclusive): 1. Most organisations use software packages for administration, document and data management, maintaining registries, finances, accounting and payroll calculations, customer and client registry. Hence, IT developments are implemented in these fields. It is rarely assessed, however, if these developments optimise internal business or operation processes. 2. The most important aspect of IT development is usually modernising existing tools and systems, thus developments are scheduled according to the amortisation of these. 3. The rate of respondents considering ICT essential hardly reached two thirds. A potential reason for this is that participants are not fully aware of the potentials ICT offers for their organisations. 4. Most organisations rely on the IT services of people with college or university degrees. However, the rate of employees with such qualifications is only about 20% while employees with secondary qualifications make up for about 30%. 5. Organisations show a demand for customised consultations by well prepared IT experts to receive practical help for IT applications and developments facilitating efficient operation. Our conclusions and recommendations based on the summary are as follows. 1. As only few with a special intermediate degree are employed by organisations, an EUCIP Core training with contents somewhat different compared to previous trainings should be introduced into intermediate vocational education specialised at ITC. As a result, graduates could replace experts with higher education degrees in certain fields while the training could also serve as a suitable base for professional development. 2. When designing the EUCIP Core training programme, having courses or exams in English should also be considered. 3. The training programme should particularly emphasis practical solutions and the development of extra competences such as independence, problem solving or team working. 4. When designing the EUCIP Core training programme, its potential incorporation into tertiary vocational training in the future.
  9. 9. 2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615 it-shape.hu NEWSLETTER 6. issue November 2014 Page 9 of 10 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Events I-T Shape Meeting, Dublin, Ireland 23rd -24th October 2014. The third I-T Shape meeting was held on the 23rd -24th October 2014 in Dublin. The purposes of the meeting were the sustainability, the Hungarian localization of EUCIP Core certificate, and the expert groups’ discussion about the experience of localization. You can find a detailed report from the meeting in the 5th issue of the I-T Shape Newsletter. 2inno.eu – „Do innovation now!” LLP Project The project aims at managing directors and senior employees of SMEs and supports them in recognizing the need for innovation management and innovation processes introduce even the smallest companies, and to make practical usable.18 experienced partners from Europe, including 6"core partners”, will introduce the results of the project in six EU countries(AT,ES,HU,IE,IT,SI). But why is it – especially for small businesses – so difficult to put "innovation" into practice? The way we suggest in the 2inno.eu project is the DUI-mode: "learning by doing, using and interacting mode". Small businesses should learn very practical, in just a few weeks, how they can start concrete innovation projects and further implement them successfully. In customized workshops on "Innovation Management" we want to help them to close the gap between theory and practice, so they can find their own "culture of innovation". All according the motto „DO innovation now!“ Website: www.2inno.eu Project basics Acronym: I-T Shape Title: I-T Shape – Shape European Level Competitive IT Certification for the Hungarian Vocational Education Duration: 1.October 2013 – 30 September 2015 Action type: Transfer of Innovation Program: Leonardo da Vinci – LLL Subprogram Participating countries: Hungary, Italy, Ireland Website: http://it-shape.hu Contact: Mária Hartyányi, iTStudy Hungary Educational and Researching Centre, Hungary E-mail: maria.hartyanyi@itstudy.hu, skype: hmaria718
  10. 10. 2013-1-HU1-LEO05-09615 it-shape.hu NEWSLETTER 6. issue November 2014 Page 10 of 10 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Partnership ITSTUDY- iTStudy Hungary Ltd. HU AICA - Association of Italian Information Technology IT ISF - S Fermi in Pontedera IT ICS The Irish Computer Society IE SZÁMALK-Szalézi Vocational Highschool HU Öveges József Vocational and Grammar School HU Neumann János Vocational School for Information Technology HU Makó – Galamb József Agricultural Vocational School HU University of West Hungary HU Enterprise Development Foundation of Pest Country HU Target groups Primary target group: Hungarian VET students, career changers, non-qualified IT practitioners, job-seekers looking to break into the industry, secondary target group: VET teachers and trainers, managers and employees of SMEs Objectives Adaptation and localization of EUCIP Core in Hungary included its three Knowledge Areas (Plan, Build and Operate) Elaborate the detailed syllabuses and the Hungarian EUCIP Core Program Validating the results: piloting the first module by involving Hungarian teachers, 50-60 participants from vocational/university and adult educational institutes Accrediting EUCIP Core under the Hungarian Program Accreditation System. Work-packages WP1 Project Management WP2 Analysis and Design WP3 EUCIP Core Adaptation WP4 EUCIP Core Localization WP5 Pilot trainings WP6 Evaluation WP7 Valorization WP8 Dissemination

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