Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

System-level modelling: IS-Wireless tutorial on IEEE Globecom 2015

6,778 views

Published on

"System-level modelling of HetNets, Carrier Aggregation and Scheduling in MATLAB" is a tutorial delivered on IEEE Globecom 2015 in San Diego, CA.

Presentation was conducted by IS-Wireless CEO - Dr. Slawomir Pietrzyk.

Published in: Technology
  • D0WNL0AD FULL ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶ http://1url.pw/uf6Q3 ◀ ◀ ◀ ◀
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • DOWNLOAD THIS BOOKS INTO AVAILABLE FORMAT (Unlimited) ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... Download Full PDF EBOOK here { https://soo.gd/qURD } ......................................................................................................................... Download Full EPUB Ebook here { https://soo.gd/qURD } ......................................................................................................................... Download Full doc Ebook here { https://soo.gd/qURD } ......................................................................................................................... Download PDF EBOOK here { https://soo.gd/qURD } ......................................................................................................................... Download EPUB Ebook here { https://soo.gd/qURD } ......................................................................................................................... Download doc Ebook here { https://soo.gd/qURD } ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................................... eBook is an electronic version of a traditional print book THIS can be read by using a personal computer or by using an eBook reader. (An eBook reader can be a software application for use on a computer such as Microsoft's free Reader application, or a book-sized computer THIS is used solely as a reading device such as Nuvomedia's Rocket eBook.) Users can purchase an eBook on diskette or CD, but the most popular method of getting an eBook is to purchase a downloadable file of the eBook (or other reading material) from a Web site (such as Barnes and Noble) to be read from the user's computer or reading device. Generally, an eBook can be downloaded in five minutes or less ......................................................................................................................... .............. Browse by Genre Available eBooks .............................................................................................................................. Art, Biography, Business, Chick Lit, Children's, Christian, Classics, Comics, Contemporary, Cookbooks, Manga, Memoir, Music, Mystery, Non Fiction, Paranormal, Philosophy, Poetry, Psychology, Religion, Romance, Science, Science Fiction, Self Help, Suspense, Spirituality, Sports, Thriller, Travel, Young Adult, Crime, Ebooks, Fantasy, Fiction, Graphic Novels, Historical Fiction, History, Horror, Humor And Comedy, ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... .....BEST SELLER FOR EBOOK RECOMMEND............................................................. ......................................................................................................................... Blowout: Corrupted Democracy, Rogue State Russia, and the Richest, Most Destructive Industry on Earth,-- The Ride of a Lifetime: Lessons Learned from 15 Years as CEO of the Walt Disney Company,-- Call Sign Chaos: Learning to Lead,-- StrengthsFinder 2.0,-- Stillness Is the Key,-- She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story THIS Helped Ignite a Movement,-- Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones,-- Everything Is Figureoutable,-- What It Takes: Lessons in the Pursuit of Excellence,-- Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money THIS the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!,-- The Total Money Makeover: Classic Edition: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness,-- Shut Up and Listen!: Hard Business Truths THIS Will Help You Succeed, ......................................................................................................................... .........................................................................................................................
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • CAN WE HAVE SCHEDULING FOR LTE ALSO WITH THIS TOOL?
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • These low level details are really help to those who really have thirst
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • You people are really doing the best in Advanced Wireless Technology in the World I would say
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

System-level modelling: IS-Wireless tutorial on IEEE Globecom 2015

  1. 1. System-level modelling of HetNets, Carrier Aggregation and Scheduling in MATLAB Dr. Sławomir Pietrzyk IEEE Globecom 2015 industry tutorial
  2. 2. Tutorial Outline • About us • LTE/LTE-Advanced introduction • E-UTRA Rel.10: HetNets, Carrier Aggregation and SON • LTE MAC Lab – system level simulator in MATLAB • LTE-A HeNet use cases modelled in MATLAB – Heterogeneous Network – Carrier Aggregation – Scheduling
  3. 3. ABOUT IS-Wireless is an advanced wireless communications company. We are developing protocols, simulators and IP algorithms. We also deliver 4G and 5G courses.
  4. 4. Company overview • IS-Wireless is a Polish software developer and IP provider specializing in advanced solutions for wireless systems. • IS-Wireless develops 4G and 5G algorithms, protocols and tools that are targeted primarily at early technology adopters including ODMs, OEMs, chip vendors and operators. Founder and CEO Ownership Location Industry Products Services Web COMPANY FACTS Slawomir Pietrzyk Privately held Piaseczno near Warsaw, Poland, EU Wireless communications Software: protocols and simulators, IP: algorithms and know-how Technical courses, wireless systems design www.is-wireless.com
  5. 5. LTE-Advanced Introduction
  6. 6. 4G System Requirements IMT Advanced …a set of key features for ITU-R Has defined… …which are as follows: • a high degree of commonality and functionality worldwide while retaining the flexibility to support a wide range of services and applications in a cost efficient manner; • compatibility of services within IMT and with fixed networks; • capability of interworking with other radio access systems; • high quality mobile services; • user equipment suitable for worldwide use; • user-friendly applications, services and equipment; • worldwide roaming capability; • enhanced peak data rates to support advanced services and applications (100Mbit/s for high and 1Gbit/s for low mobility were established as targets for research). …for the technology, that can be called: A 4G System
  7. 7. 3GPP Features’ Roadmap 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Release 8: • MIMO (4 layers) • TF Scheduling • FDD/TDD mode • OFDMA/SCFDMA • HARQ • Reduced architecture • Adaptive MCS Release 9: • MBMS based on SFN • SON • Location services Release 10: • Carrier Aggregation • MIMO (8 layers in DL, 4 layers in UL) • Relay nodes • Enhanced HeNB and HetNets • eICIC Release 11: • CoMP • FeICIC • ePDCCH Release 12: • Device-to-Device • Proximity Services • Higher modulation order (256 QAM) • Dual connectivity • SON enhancements • Mobility enhacements Release 13: • LTE in unlicensed spectrum • Carrier Aggregation enhancement • Enhancements for D2D • Full-dimension MIMO
  8. 8. LTE-Advanced Introduction LTE Rel. 8/9 Basic Radio Access Techniques Summary OFDMA SC-FDMA • OFDMA Scheme • Adaptive modulation: QPSK, 16QAM, 64QAM • MIMO (2x2, 4x4, SISO, TxDiversity, SU-MIMO) • System BW: 1.4, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20 MHz • HARQ and QoS support DL Radio Interface Features • SCFDMA Scheme • Adaptive modulation: QPSK, 16QAM, 64QAM (opt) • System BW: 1.4, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20 MHz • HARQ and QoS support UL Radio Interface Features E-UTRA Rel. 8/9 Downlink E-UTRA Rel. 8/9 Uplink SC-FDMAOFDMA eNB eNB
  9. 9. LTE-Advanced Introduction LTE Rel. 10 Radio Access Enhancements Summary SC-FDMA • Carrier Aggregation • MIMO for up to 8x8 (MU-MIMO and BF) • Additional Pilots (CSI and UE specific) DL Radio Interface Additional Features • Carrier Aggregation • MIMO for up to 4x4 (SU-MIMO, MU-MIMO) • Clustered SCFDMA Scheme UL Radio Interface Additional Features E-UTRA Rel. 10 Downlink E-UTRA Rel. 10 Uplink OFDMA eNB eNB RN Relaying RN Relaying
  10. 10. LTE-Advanced Introduction LTE Rel. 11 Radio Access Enhancements Summary SC-FDMA • Coordinated Multipoint • Interference rejection combining (IRC) UE receiver DL Radio Interface Additional Features • Coordinated Multipoint using Virtual Cell ID (VCID) UL Radio Interface Additional Features E-UTRA Rel. 11 Downlink E-UTRA Rel. 11 Uplink OFDMA eNB eNB RRH small cell CoMP using VCID CoMP
  11. 11. LTE-Advanced Introduction LTE Rel. 12 Radio Access Enhancements Summary • Aggregating more CCs • More layers in MIMO • Device discovery Radio Interface Additional Features E-UTRA Rel. 12 eNB eNBsmall cell 256 QAM Discovery E-UTRA Rel. 12
  12. 12. LTE-Advanced Introduction LTE Rel. 13 Radio Access Enhancements Summary • 3D antennas (full-dimension beamforming) • LTE in unlicensed Radio Interface Additional Features E-UTRA Rel. 13 eNB Unlicensed band
  13. 13. E-UTRA Release 10 Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets)
  14. 14. E-UTRA Rel. 10 HetNets Heterogeneous Network Concept and Cell Types Internet Homogeneous Network EPC • Regular network • General macro-cell approach • Equal power nodes • Large coverage • Planned sites Heterogeneous Network HeNB RN EPC eNB MeNB Macro PeNBPeNB Pico • Non regular network • Overlapping cells • Different node types • Different power levels • Different coverages • HeNBs - not planned sites (interference problem) Extended macrocell Max Tx Power = 30dBm Macrocell Max Tx power = up to regulator Picocell (eNB with lower power in hot zones – for capacity increase) Max Tx power = 24dBm Femtocell (CSG approach) Max Tx power = 20dBm Backhaul links eNB eNB eNB
  15. 15. E-UTRA Rel. 10 HetNets LTE ICIC and SON – HeNB Configuration Example (Over the Air) HeNB MeNB 1. Plug in to power supply and internet 2. Configuration downloading 3. Carrier sensing and measurements 4. Self configuration: Power and time/frequency settings 5. Adaptive cell adjustments by PC and FFR: more users in hotspot – higher power less users – less power f1 f1 Time domain shift Time and frequency domain shift 10MHz (MeNB) 10MHz (HeNB) 1SF 10MHz (MeNB) 5MHz (HeNB) 10MHz (MeNB) MeNB DL Radio frame MeNB DL Radio frame HeNB DL Radio frame HeNB DL Radio frame PDSCH PDCCH PBCH & SS 3 symbols time shift for CR 1 Subframe timing change for sync and PBCH 3 symbols time shift for CR Fc shift (provides sync and PBCH shift)
  16. 16. E-UTRA Rel. 10 HetNets HeNB RF Issues HeNB HeNB MeNB DL Receiver ”HeNB Sniffer” ”NW listening module” Macro eNB Measurements RSRP, RSRQ, Cell ID, Frame Timing HUE to MeNB pathloss calc. other HeNB Measurements RSRP, Cell ID HUE to HeNB pathloss calc Max overall Tx power, Pmax = 20dBm 1 Tx  20dBm / AP2 Tx  17dBm / AP 4 Tx  14dBm / AP 8 Tx  11dBm / AP
  17. 17. E-UTRA Rel. 10 HetNets LTE ICIC – Picocell ICIC Mechanisms Non-Carrier Aggregation Scenarios Carrier Aggregation Scenario MeNB PeNB X2 Over X2 transmission agreement: subframe reservation Almost Blank Subframes usage (time domain resource partitioning max power in non-overlapping subframes) Pico cell range extension method (less than max power in some subframes) MeNB DL Tx PeNB DL Tx subframes subframes MeNB DL Tx PeNB DL Tx subframes subframes MeNB and PeNB are transmitting with max powers (in different SFs) PeNB transmits in all SFs MeNB transmits with lower power in certain SFs MeNB PeNB fCC1 (PCC) CC2 (SCC) fCC1 (SCC) CC2 (PCC) CC1 CC2 t t t t PDCCH PDSCH Scheduling assignment MeNB PeNB Use of Cross-Carrier scheduling For CEU use PCell For CCU use SCell MeNB’s power is lower in this SF (SNIR at PeNB higher)
  18. 18. PHY Enhancements Carrier Aggregation (Bandwidth Extension)
  19. 19. E-UTRA Rel. 10 PHY Bandwidth Extension by Carrier Aggregation (Component Carriers) Example CA Configurations f BW (1.4 MHz – 20MHz) f BW (1.4 MHz – 20MHz) Rel.8 Bandwidth – max 20MHz Component Carrier (Rel. 8 Carrier) Rel.10 Bandwidth – max 100MHz (up to 5 Component Carriers) LTE Rel. 8 Carrier LTE Rel. 10 Carrier Aggregation f 20MHz 20MHz 40MHz f 20MHz 20MHz 100MHz 20MHz 20MHz 20MHz f 20MHz 10MHz 35MHz 5MHz Equal size CCs Various sizes CCs
  20. 20. E-UTRA Rel. 10 PHY Carrier Aggregation Options Intraband Contiguous CA • Less likely scenario for today allocations (no 100MHz bands) • Possibly to be used in 3.5GHz bands • Considered for DL and UL Intraband Non-Contiguous CA • E.g. scenario where operator has two non contiguous carriers with other operator’s allocation inbetween • Considered for DL and UL Interband Non-Contiguous CA • Multiple CCs belongs to different bands (e.g. 2.6GHz and 800MHz are aggregated) • Can improve mobility robustness by exploiting different radio propagation characteristics of different bands • Require additional complexity in RF front end • Considered for DL only f CC1 Band A (e.g. 1800 MHz) e.g. 20MHz CC x 5 f CC1 Band A (e.g. 1800 MHz) e.g. 20MHz CC x 3 f CC1 Band A (e.g. 800 MHz) e.g. 20MHz CC x 2 CC2 Band B (e.g. 2600 MHz) CC2 CC3 CC2 CC3 CC4 CC5 It is easiest to use contiguous CA: •Single IFFT •Easier scheduling •Single RF units possible
  21. 21. E-UTRA Rel. 10 PHY Carrier Aggregation for FDD and TDD Example FDD Configurations No aggregation Symmetric aggregation f DL UL f DL UL Asymmetric aggregation f DL UL Example TDD Configurations f DL/UL f DL/UL Asymmetric aggregation not possible!
  22. 22. E-UTRA Rel. 10 PHY DL and UL Radio Frames Consideration for Rel. 8 and Rel. 10 Downlink Radio FramesRel. 8 DL Radio Frame (Single DL Carrier) Rel. 10 DL Radio Frames (CA with 3 CCs) BW (e.g. 20MHz) 10ms CC1 CC2 CC3 PDCCH per CC (backhwards compatibilty for rel. 8 UEs) Broadcast per CC Uplink Radio FramesRel. 8 UL Radio Frame (Single UL Carrier) Rel. 10 UL Radio Frames (CA with 3 CCs) PUCCH per CC (backwards compatibility for rel.8 UEs) PUSCH PUCCH 10ms
  23. 23. LTE and SON Introduction SON Introduction
  24. 24. SON Introduction SON Concept – Drivers for SON Technical Drivers Business Drivers Increasing demand for diversity of services Need to reduce Time-To-Market for innovative / new services High performance required • Growing number of BW hungry services • Growing number of devices and change of device character (M2M) Heterogeneous Network to be cooperatively managed • Macro/Micro/Pico/Femto cells and Relays Overlaying multiple networks for a single operator • 2G/3G/LTE/WiFi Higher operational frequencies • Increase number of cells required / higher NW cost Increasing complexity of networks • Multitude / growing number of parameters with interdependencies • Multitude of RRM algorithms working at different time scales HO thresh PRB conf TimeToTrig Hysteresis AC thresh AC PSched LTE GSM UMTS WiFi Core cdma 2000
  25. 25. SON Introduction SON Concept – Expected SON Benefits OPEX Reduction Reduction of Drive Tests (UE & eNB meas) Reduction of manual effort in planning (by param settings) Energy saving (energy efficiency) Less staff for OAM Less / no site visits Simplified deployment of femto cells Less leased transmission lines required due to optimized resource utilization Reduction of manual effort for monitoring & optimization (e.g. identify of problems/troubleshooting) SON Technical Benefits Business Benefits More Capacity Better Coverage Improved Quality Increased Automation Streamlined CAPEX Improved ROI Reduced Churn Lower OPEX Capex Reduction Postponed investments (delayed capacity expansions) Less sites for the same cap/cov targets (reducing amount of equip.) Churn Reduction / Improved ROI Better service quality (optimized NW) Better service availability Fast recovery from failures (reduction of NW „downtime” Less human errors Faster Time to Market Reduction of time for first commercial operation Fast new eNB config and run
  26. 26. SON Introduction SON Concept – Evolution Path Towards Autonomous System OAM 1. Basic Meas Action 2. Managed Meas Action OAM 3. Predictive Auto Algs Suggested change Approved OAM 4. Adaptive Auto Algs Suggested change Approved Policy Long term performance report Adjust policy OAM 5. Autonomic Auto Algs Suggested change Approved Policy Adjust policy One time high level policy definition All NEs are managed independetly Collect & aggregate info from NEs into few consoles where required configs are initiated manually Automatic algs (e.g. SON) recommend actions based on gathered info. Actions need to be approved System automatically takes action based on measurements controlled by low level policies set/adjusted by operator Fully integrated system is dynamically managed based on business rules and policies
  27. 27. SON Introduction NW Management: No-SON vs SON Approaches NO SON SONManual Configuration Self-Configuration Manual Optimization Self-Optimization Manual Fault Management Self-Healing eNB Manual setup (on-site visits) eNB Plug in OAM Plug&Play (automatic config) eNB Config download eNB Poor quality Performance Indicators Hmm… how to adjust? AGES later… adjust params eNBeNB Better quality eNBeNB Poor quality eNBeNB Performance Indicators Few seconds later… adjust params Best/optimum quality eNBeNB eNB Failure Alarm OAM AGES later… recovery team (on site visit) eNBeNB eNB Failure Alarm OAM Alarm Few seconds later… reload/fallback software Take over UEs OAM Auto-Tune Auto-Repair
  28. 28. SON Introduction SON Background – Involved Parties • NGMN (www.ngmn.org) – Wireless operator consortium provides requirements on next generation networks – Identifies real needs from operators about what is necessary for OAM to optimize – Defines recommendations on SON & OAM Requirements • 3GPP (www.3gpp.org) – Standardization body for 2G/3G/LTE/LTE-Advanced – Defines a framework based on NGMN inputs to enable SON – Defines interfaces / messages / procedures to enable SON – Defines Use Cases for SON features – Defines common language (XML) and network management architecture (NMS) – Does not define algorithms • SOCRATES (www.fp7-socrates.org) – Self-Optimisation and self-ConfiguRATion in wirelEss networkS – FP7 project to provide SON features (individual algorithms) – Jan 2008 to Dec 2010 – Worked closely with NGMN to get real needs from operators – Worked closely with 3GPP to define the algorithms within a framework – Developed algorithms for Self-Configuration, Self-Optimization, Self-Healing, X-Map Estimation – Provided requirements and framework for SON Coordination
  29. 29. LTE-Advanced Deployment Issues
  30. 30. LTE-Advanced Deployment RAN Performance Enhancements Due to LTE-Advanced Components eNB RN UE position [m] DataRate Cell Edge User (CEU)Cell Center User (CCU) LTE Rel. 8 Coverage hole LTE-Advanced Rel. 10/11 Relays and Beamforming Higher order MIMO Carrier Aggregation CoMP CoMP Simple formula Max_throughput = Required_Spectral_Efficiency * BW Assuming MIMO 8x8 and BW 100MHz We end up at Max_thr = 30bit/s/Hz * 100MHz = 3Gbit/s
  31. 31. LTE-Advanced Deployment Backward Compatibility to LTE Rel. 8 Bandwidth Issues f Total BW e.g. 100MHz Component Carrier (20MHz) UE capabilities 100MHz support 40MHz support 20MHz support Rel. 10 UE Rel. 10 UE Rel. 10 UE Rel. 8 UE Rel. 8 UE Rel. 10 UE Rel. 10 UE Rel. 8 UE UEs during NW attach signalls the supported release and number of supported Carriers CA concept allows to be backward compatible to Rel. 8 (separate PHY per CC) Other backward compatibility Issues Issue Backwards compatibility support PHY signalling PDCCH and PUCCH per Component carrier RF Processing per component carrier UE Rel. 8 categories Signalled explicitely MIMO Support Signalled explicitely Relay transparency Use of MBSFN subframe Scheduling Per component carrier
  32. 32. LTE-Advanced Deployment Migration from LTE Rel. 8 to LTE-Advanced Rel. 10 (example) Rel. 8 Macrocell Deployment R.8 eNB R.8 eNB f f R.8 eNB R.8 eNB f MoreBWandMIMO (softwareupgrade) R.10 eNB R.8 eNB R.8 eNB HetNet MIMO 2x2 BW 20MHz MIMO 4x4 BW 40MHz RN HeNB R.10 eNB RN HeNB MoreBWandMIMO f R.10 eNB R.10 eNB MIMO 4x4 BW 40MHz MIMO 8x8 BW 100MHz Rel. 10 HeNBs and Relay Nodes Deployment R.10 eNB Additional Component Carrier Aggregations and MIMO extensions Rel. 10 Macrocell Deployment (base case for CA and MIMO)
  33. 33. E-UTRA Rel. 10 Carrier Aggregation Deployment Scenarios for CA Scenario 1 (supported for DL and UL in Rel. 10) • F1 and F2 cells - co-located and overlaid (nearly the same coverage). • Both freqs provide sufficient coverage. • Mobility – based on F1 or F2 coverage • F1 and F2 in the same band, e.g., 2.6 GHz Description Example F1 F2 • F1 and F2 cells - co-located and overlaid (F2 - smaller coverage due to larger path loss) • F1 provides sufficient coverage, F2 - used to improve throughput. • Mobility - based on F1 coverage. • F1 and F2 in different bands, e.g., F1 = 800 MHz, F2 = 3.5 GHz. • F1 and F2 cells - co-located. F2 antennas directed to F1 cell edges (cell edge thrpt increased) • F1 provides sufficient coverage, F2 can have holes, e.g., due to larger path loss. • Mobility - based on F1 coverage. • Likely when F1 and F2 in different bands, e.g., F1 = 800 MHz, F2 = 3.5 GHz. • F1 provides macro coverage, on F2 (RRHs) are used to improve throughput at hot spots. • Mobility - based on F1 coverage. • Likely when F1 and F2 in different bands, e.g., F1 = 800 MHz, F2 = 3.5 GHz. • Similar to scenario #2, but frequency selective repeaters are deployed - coverage is extended for one of the carrier frequencies. Scenario 2 (supported for DL and UL in Rel. 10) Scenario 3 (supported for DL and UL in Rel. 10) Scenario 4 (supported for DL in Rel. 10) Scenario 5 (supported for DL in Rel. 10)
  34. 34. LTE-Advanced HetNet Deployment Issues
  35. 35. LTE-Advanced Deployment Femto-cell (HeNB) Typical Attributes Attribute name Macro eNB HeNB Infrastructure finance Operator End User Backhaul Fiber/Microwave Existing broadband internet Planning Operator End user (no central planning) Deployment Operator rollout End user one touch installation (SON based) QoS Operator controlled Best effort Control Operator via O&M Operator via Internet Mobility Typical scenario (outdoors and moving) Nomadic / best effort HO (indoors and sitting down)
  36. 36. Rep HeNB eNB RN L1 Repeater (amplifies the signal – backward compatible to Rel. 8 UEs) L3 Rel. 10 Relay Node •uses MBSFN subframe for backhauling  known by Rel. 8 UEs •it is backward compatible and can be used for relaying to Rel. 8 terminals •Transparent to Rel. 8 and Rel. 10 terminals fCC1 (PCC) CC2 (SCC) fCC1 (SCC) CC2 (PCC) Carrier aggregation for Hetnet Cross carrier scheduling for interference avoidance for signalling Relaying HeNBs Femtocells deployment in a building •No planning sites •Switched on and off depending on end user decision Femtocell location Walls Interference (ICIC required) LTE-Advanced Deployment HetNet Deployment Issues
  37. 37. Self-Optimization for HetNets Resource Partitioning for Femto-Scenario (Example) Scenario and algorithm (graph based scheme) Example graph coloring for resource distribution A B C Interference Feedback Central Controller (HeMS) A B C Femto cell Interference Interferer: A A,C B Interfering neighbor discovery • UE makes measurements • HeNB identifies its interfering neighbors according to a predefined SINR thresh 1 HeNBs send CellIDs of the interfering neighbors to central node 2 Central controller maps info to interference graph • HeNB – node • Interference relation between two HeNBs - edge 3 Identify the bandwidth distribution (PRB-HeNB) pairs which maximizes the resource efficiency A C E BD Freq Power Basic / not optimized case Resource efficiency: 5/15 Available resources A C E BD Resource efficiency: 9/15 A C E BD Resource efficiency: 6/15
  38. 38. LTE MAC Lab Product presentation
  39. 39. LTE MAC Lab Overview LTE MAC Lab is an Advanced HetNets system-level simulation tool running under MATLAB environment. It allows user to model a wireless LTE network deployment, analyze its performance and understand dynamic mechanisms of the radio interface.
  40. 40. Main Applications LTE MAC Lab is an universal tool for LTE MAC simulation. Software can be used by ODM, OEM, Chip manufacturers, Protocol Stack Developers, Operators, Research Institutes, Univerisities, Training Companies. Main Applications: • MAC prototyping, where LTE MAC Lab shortens the development time. • R&D, where LTE MAC Lab provides simulation framework. • Development of MAC protocols and RF processing, where LTE MAC Lab serves as a reference model. • Network modeling and analysis, where LTE MAC Lab allows to estimate cell-level performance. • Education, where LTE MAC Lab serves as an environment to visualize LTE network operation.
  41. 41. LTE MAC Lab architecture and deliverables Deliverables: • LTE MAC Lab is delivered as a Toolbox operating under MATLAB environment, • It consists of m-, mex- and p-files, • Substantial parts of the code are open for the customer modification, • All functions have well-defined interfaces with described parameters, which make it possible to replace them with proprietary customer’s implementation.
  42. 42. Technical Specification Summary • LTE specific features: – Carrier Aggregation (3GPP LTE Rel. 10) – Heterogeneous Network (multicell environment with diverse parameters of the eNBs) – LTE channel bands: 700 - 3000 MHz – All LTE bandwidths: 1.4MHz, 3MHz, 5MHz, 10MHz, 15MHz, 20MHz • Simulator features: – Dedicated functions for user defined algorithms (i.e. open API) – Downlink transmission – RRM Functionalities: scheduling (PF, RR, ISW proprietary), link adaptation, handover, carrier activation/deactivation – Users Mobility Models: Random Direction Model, Random Way Point Model; • Link model: – Pathloss models: Modified Okumura – Hata model, 3GPP TS 36.942 Model, Winner Model, COST 231 Model; – Multipath models: 3GPP TS 36.942 Model, Winner Model, Random Distribution Model; – Environments: Rural, Urban, Suburban; – Antennas Characteristic Model; Omnidirectional Characteristic, 1 or 3 Sectors Characteristic
  43. 43. LTE MAC Lab Simulation scenarios
  44. 44. Main simulation parameters Parameter Value Simulation length 100 ms (TTIs) SINR mapping model MIESM Simulated area size 300m x 300m Pathloss model 3GPP TS 36.942 Multipath model 3GPP TS 36.101 Number of UEs 10 Mobility of UEs low Tx power of the eNB 46 dBm Antenna characteristics Omnidirectional Carrier frequency 800 MHz Bandwidth 5 MHz Scheduling algorithm Round Robin
  45. 45. Simulated cases • Benchmark scenario – Single cell – Single carrier • Two-carriers scenario – Single cell – Two carriers • HetNet scenario – Large cell – And small cell (BW = 5 MHz, fc = 800 MHz, Tx Power = 30 dBm) • Scheduling comparison – Round-robin – ISW-proprietary
  46. 46. IS-Wireless ul. Puławska 45b, 05-500 Piaseczno / near Warsaw, Poland, EU phone fax web e-mail +48 22 213 8297 +48 22 213 8298 www.is-wireless.com info@is-wireless.com CONTACT DETAILS

×