Creative Quarter

430 views

Published on

Scottish Government event Nov 2013.

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
430
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • The IRISS Innovation and Improvement programme is focused on supporting the workforce to realise their potential to make change happen with others. We believe there are enough of us who want to make a difference. However, we know that innovation and improvement is challenging, because it means continually questioning, reflecting and sometimes rethinking our values, beliefs and assumptions. In essence it is an ongoing process of learning in relation to interactions, support models and the shape of systems. Part of our role is to support the sector to create conditions where ideas and new thinking can flourish.
  • Building evidence about innovation and creativity to improve the understanding and confidence of people in this sector
  • The IRISS Innovation and Improvement programme is focused on supporting the workforce to realise their potential to make change happen with others. We believe there are enough of us who want to make a difference. However, we know that innovation and improvement is challenging, because it means continually questioning, reflecting and sometimes rethinking our values, beliefs and assumptions. In essence it is an ongoing process of learning in relation to interactions, support models and the shape of systems. Part of our role is to support the sector to create conditions where ideas and new thinking can flourish.
  • In fact, IRISS conducted a piece of research x years ago which showed that practitioners felt that there were numerous barriers to innovating in their organisation/ project /work - - To name a few were : lack of money, lack of time, lack of political will, organisational structures not being conducive to change etc etc….
    So we know that practitioners don’t generally feel creative – although the evidence suggests that they definitely do
  • In Scotland there is a drive to reform public services in general, and social services in particular.  
    The government in Scotland have responded to these complex challenges by presenting an improvement agenda with creativity at its core. From reshaping care for older people, self directed support and public sector reform – there is a sympathetic policy context at the moment supporting people to have ideas and to do things differently.
    However, at the same time, there is the competing agenda of improvements which will also be achieved by tightening oversight and accountability, through transparent and rigorous audit.  
  • Although these things may be true, as an innovation and improvement team we think that there is a remarkable opportunity for people to reshape a space for new ways of doing things – to bring what is known from other places and to introduce new approaches to those attempting to find ways of collaborating, innovating and finding imaginative responses.
    Our response as an innovation and improvement team is to look at creativity. To think about what stimulates it in social services and what it means in practice for the workforce working to implement many of the agendas that have been outlined. There are four main strands of the project:
    Looks at disciplines that have creativity as a central feature – the arts (the shared experience in the arts has offered a powerful reference point for dialogue as it touches upon deeper (often non verbal) starting points. We know that creativity can change lives for the better and we would like you to help us understand how the creative arts are being used, and the impact this type of work can have for people supported by services and for staff. )
    Looks at how we can support practitioners to inspire creativity within their organisaiton and within their practice (that includes providing opportunities for practitioners to reflect on their organisation's current practice and involves introducing them to tools and techniques that will help encourage greater creativity and innovation within their current infrastructure)
    Looks at how we can support the development of more creative support for people who use services
    Today’s presentation will focus on the last strand: supporting the development of more creative support packages for people who use services.
  • Hobson’s choice is a phrase that has come from Mr Hobson (1544-1631) developed an intriguing way of offering choice to his customers. Hobson ran a business hiring out horses and would offer the customer any one of his forty horses ‘so long as they chose the one next to the door'. This was to prevent the best horses always being chosen, which would have caused those horses to become overused. Hobson’s choice is a free choice in which only one option is offered. The story of Hobson is dramatic, and a little ridiculous, but it carries an important point about facilitating real choice.
    With the emergence of SDS in Scotland It is crucial to ensure there is a range of support for people to choose between. This project is a call for action! Local authorities, in their role as commissioners, have a challenging role in facilitating the market and providing choice for people who use services..With the move towards Self-Directed Support in Scotland, we are interested to consider how we can support local authorities to encourage market diversification and facilitation
    The market facilitation task breaks into three areas: 
    Market intelligence: a shared (co-produced) understanding of local supply and demand
    Market structuring: a clear statement of how the local authority intends to behave/perform in the market
    Market interventions: the activities the local authority will undertake to do this.
    Co-production of market solutions is a key theme recognising that knowledge of need, demand, mapping of local assets and understanding of support quality and effectiveness is enhanced when it comes from a range of sources. Our focus for this project, therefore, is on this first stage of market facilitation. And making sure that people fron the community, who use services and who provide services have the opportunity to shape the types of supports that are offered.
  • Locally, P&K Council struggles to provide services in the area. And with the introduction of SDS a choice of services in the area seems very unlikely as it stands
    However there is a large enterprising section of the community and an organisation called Growbiz have been working in the area and have been commissioned for a further two years to develop enterprise. So there are lots of people out there with business skills and capacity. There are lots of artists and lots of people who work several jobs - but who are lacking in ideas and real insight into how their local market – and thus environment could be different.
    Inspired by the work we showcased from Community Catalysts last year……In spring 2014 IRISS will make available a £10,000 seed fund to help people who use services, carers and the wider community of Pitlochry with ideas for a new business start up, or existing small businesses develop new innovative ideas. The function of this is to stimulate new services and supports for people to choose from locally – i.e. to stimulate the market place.
    IRISS are working alongside these two agencies to support the network of interested people to develop ideas that are grounded in the needs and ambitions of local people. Our role in the process is to:
    support creative idea development (linking with Duncan of Jordanstone Art school students to accommodate this)​,​
    put forward £10k as a development fund to support people to test out their ideas in practice​, and​
    recording the progress of ideas as they are developed​.​
  • First phase of the project….. is that we have some service design masters students working together with local people to gather insights about the gaps and opportunities for service delivery in the area. They will use the tried and tested design process to get a better understanding of what it is like to live locally. Over a period of 4 weeks, we’ve worked with local partners to ensure that the students have sufficient time to engage with a wide variety of people.
    Fascinating how close the students were able to get to the people and practitioners. And how beneficial it has been to the project that people who are equally removed from policy and practice discussing what it all means (students and people who access support).
  • - highlight the insights from student presentations.
    A really beautiful setting
    Higher than average proportion of older people and an aging population
    A community in good nick in general.
    Good influx of visitors and money through tourism
    Lack opportunity for all-year employment
    Difficulty of communication between older and young
    A changing place – used to be closer 15 years ago
    Influx of migrant workers who are less included
  • Informing themselves of the roles and responsibilities of the key players of care and support in Pitlochry.
  • Researching the true nature of the town – it’s opportunities and what is missing.
  • Using their learning from the research to visualise the connections between the community and the key health and social care stakeholders in Pitlochry. From that they developed a conversation toolkit which identifies their key outcomes and what they would like to spend their time and money on. This would be useful for self-identification of needs prior to conversations with social work.
  • Community box – of which there will be several.
    It moves around the community over s set period – and can be findable anywhere people go. Co-op, Library, car park…
    Take it home, use it, pass it on.
    There would be a set day for when people would be coming together to open the boxes.
    In it you will find activities, games to explore yourself more, a puzzle which helps identify your offers to the community and what you would like to receive.
  • Use of personas to explain the process and its benefits. Telling a story.
    - Impact both as a research/design tool as well as a way to explain to the audience.
    Video clip.
  • Following on from this – we will invite people who live locally, people who use services, service providers, practitioners and the entrepreneurs to come together to learn from the students insights and to build and develop their ideas over a variety of sessions running into March. In march we will allocate funding to support people to test their ideas in practice.
    Partnership continues
    Working from identifying gaps and opportunities to strengthening abilities and towards business plans for micro enterprises.
    In spring 2014 IRISS will make available a £10,000 seed fund to help people who use services, carers and the wider community of Pitlochry with ideas for a new business start up, or existing small businesses develop new innovative ideas. The fund will be split between three opportunity strands:
     
    Products
    Services
    Models / processes of service
  • A way to collect on-the-spot feedback and document the day.
    We want the feedback to be usable in future session – and have an impact on the people who are involved in the process, and make connections.
    So it is important to document in this way – rather than the much used, and very effective, tick box approach.
  • Now there are some knotty legislative and regulatory problems that can stop community enterprise in its tracks. But the local authority is committed to addressing these and coming up with solutions to rectify.
    PAs: Can personal assistants be self-employed? Some people say yes, some no; Some councils say yes, some no… That’s before we come to the views of HMRC…
    Council readiness: How does the council ensure that they continue to support people – and at the same time support the creating of a more diverse and self-regulating service provision market?
    Local people readiness: Ensuring there is engagement across all stakeholders, that all are informed and involved to the best of our ability.
  • Creative Quarter

    1. 1. 1
    2. 2. 2
    3. 3. Data Visualisation 3
    4. 4. 4
    5. 5. Blog 5
    6. 6. 6
    7. 7. P 7
    8. 8. 8
    9. 9. Managing resistance 9
    10. 10. Barriers to creativity 10
    11. 11. Creative Quarter 11
    12. 12. Our focus 12
    13. 13. The challenge 13
    14. 14. Creative Care and Support 14
    15. 15. Service Design Service Design 15
    16. 16. Picture from students presentations Insights 16
    17. 17. 17
    18. 18. 18
    19. 19. 19
    20. 20. 20
    21. 21. 21
    22. 22. 22
    23. 23. 23
    24. 24. Show a pic of some of the prototypes that the students created Prototype 24
    25. 25. 25
    26. 26. PEOPLE powered 26
    27. 27. 27
    28. 28. Personal assistants Council readiness Local readiness 28

    ×