Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
<ul><li>Taking a lead in promoting choice, control and valued opportunities for socially excluded and vulnerable people  <...
The five faces of oppression <ul><li>Individuals and groups experience these to different degrees of intensity and in diff...
The five faces of oppression <ul><li>Continued... </li></ul><ul><li>Powerlessness...  power is used to consign people to a...
Disability places,  just people involved with services Ordinary places,  but everyone in the group shares the label Side b...
Blending in...? <ul><li>Just before I went on holiday I saw five people with learning disabilities off for a hike with two...
Slide 936 Jim Sue Raj Computing Fishing Painting “ Let’s start a fishing club”
Slide 936 Jim Sue Raj Computing Fishing Painting “ Let’s find five clubs”
43% of the UK population (27 million people) are on Facebook. One Facebook user has over 700,000 Facebook fans, according ...
Experts do not always predict well <ul><li>“ But in all my experience, I have never been in any accident... of any sort wo...
Are risk assessments accurate predictors? Ryan C, Nielssen, O, Paton M & Large M (2010)  Clinical decisions in psychiatry ...
A third of assessments failed Ryan C, Nielssen, O, Paton M & Large M (2010)  Clinical decisions in psychiatry should not b...
Risky starts Sometimes called an ‘extinction burst’ in behaviour management New opportunity
Schools or Armies? Are you hoping to add some new ideas to what people already know... ...or do you aim to defeat their ol...
Percentage of male deaths caused by war Slide 577 Graph from Layard 2005, p106 Hope for the community’s future
<ul><li>Grace  –  believing that the universe is designed to ultimately help rather than harm. </li></ul><ul><li>Responsib...
Your problem, our fix Your problem, your fix Our fix, your words Our fix, our words Slide 731 Adapted from Bevans 2002 Emp...
Joining the poetry club <ul><li>“ John refused to wash or clean clothes, preferring to wear one outfit at a time until it ...
Are community groups welcoming? Slide 818 Judged welcoming – 561 visits in total
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Taking a lead in promoting choice, control and valued opportunities for socially excluded and vulnerable people - Peter Bates

1,258 views

Published on

Peter Bates, from the National Development Team for Inclusion, speaks about the promotion of choice for excluded and vulnerable people. Recorded at North Lanarkshire Council's event Self Directed Support: The Bigger Picture on 8th November 2011.

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Taking a lead in promoting choice, control and valued opportunities for socially excluded and vulnerable people - Peter Bates

  1. 1. <ul><li>Taking a lead in promoting choice, control and valued opportunities for socially excluded and vulnerable people </li></ul><ul><li>Peter Bates </li></ul><ul><li>peter.bates@ndti.org.uk Tel 0115 910 9387 </li></ul>Slide 001 people lives communities
  2. 2. The five faces of oppression <ul><li>Individuals and groups experience these to different degrees of intensity and in different combinations. </li></ul><ul><li>Exploitation... a steady transfer of the results of the labour of one social group to benefit another. </li></ul><ul><li>Marginalisation... The labour market cannot or will not use people placed on the margin and so they become poor, dependent and excluded from cultural life. </li></ul>Iris Marion Young, 1990, quoted in Thomas C (2007) Sociologies of disability and illness: Contested ideas in Disability Studies and Medical Sociology Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan Slide 821
  3. 3. The five faces of oppression <ul><li>Continued... </li></ul><ul><li>Powerlessness... power is used to consign people to a low status and so restrict their choice and opportunities. </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural imperialism... the dominant group think their view of the world is the natural and only way. </li></ul><ul><li>Violence... harassment, intimidation, ridicule and violence is used to damage, humiliate or destroy the victim. </li></ul>Iris Marion Young, 1990, quoted in Thomas C (2007) Sociologies of disability and illness: Contested ideas in Disability Studies and Medical Sociology Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan Slide 821
  4. 4. Disability places, just people involved with services Ordinary places, but everyone in the group shares the label Side by side with the general public Slide 062 “ All models are wrong, but some are quite useful.” George Box Bates et al (2006) Moving to inclusion Mental Health Today, April, pp16-18 The Inclusion Traffic Lights
  5. 5. Blending in...? <ul><li>Just before I went on holiday I saw five people with learning disabilities off for a hike with two support workers. The five wore fluorescent tabards but the supporters did not. </li></ul>While on holiday I witnessed exactly the same scene. Had they walked a very long distance or have I missed a vital piece of government legislation? From Choice Forum 29/09/10
  6. 6. Slide 936 Jim Sue Raj Computing Fishing Painting “ Let’s start a fishing club”
  7. 7. Slide 936 Jim Sue Raj Computing Fishing Painting “ Let’s find five clubs”
  8. 8. 43% of the UK population (27 million people) are on Facebook. One Facebook user has over 700,000 Facebook fans, according to Wikipedia We asked 470 staff, ‘ Would you be a Facebook friend with someone who uses services?’ 78% said definitely not and another 14% said probably not . FACEBOOK FRIENDS Slide 877 Aleksandr Orlov
  9. 9. Experts do not always predict well <ul><li>“ But in all my experience, I have never been in any accident... of any sort worth speaking about. I have seen but one vessel in distress in all my years at sea. I never saw a wreck and never have been wrecked nor was I ever in any predicament that threatened to end in disaster of any sort.” </li></ul>E.J. Smith speaking in 1907. Subsequently, Captain, RMS Titanic Slide 933
  10. 10. Are risk assessments accurate predictors? Ryan C, Nielssen, O, Paton M & Large M (2010) Clinical decisions in psychiatry should not be based on risk assessment Australasian Psychiatry 18,5, 398-403 Slide 910 Harm happened afterwards No harm afterwards Assessed as high risk More resources, more restrictions, more help Falsely labelled, unnecessary coercion, resources misallocated Assessed as low risk Avoidable harm? Reduces trust level in the wider community and media Assessment wasted time and diverted resources away from high risk patients.
  11. 11. A third of assessments failed Ryan C, Nielssen, O, Paton M & Large M (2010) Clinical decisions in psychiatry should not be based on risk assessment Australasian Psychiatry 18,5, 398-403 Slide 911 Harm happened afterwards Harm did not happen afterwards Assessed as High Risk 19 (12%) 36 (23%) Assessed as Low Risk 9 (6%) 93 (59%)
  12. 12. Risky starts Sometimes called an ‘extinction burst’ in behaviour management New opportunity
  13. 13. Schools or Armies? Are you hoping to add some new ideas to what people already know... ...or do you aim to defeat their old ideas and replace them with new ones? Slide 711
  14. 14. Percentage of male deaths caused by war Slide 577 Graph from Layard 2005, p106 Hope for the community’s future
  15. 15. <ul><li>Grace – believing that the universe is designed to ultimately help rather than harm. </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibility - influence and control in place of helpless victim thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Vision - a big project worth living for </li></ul><ul><li>Action - making plans, anticipating good things and taking action </li></ul><ul><li>Gratitude - a tireless focus on positives rather than negatives. </li></ul>Hope unpacked
  16. 16. Your problem, our fix Your problem, your fix Our fix, your words Our fix, our words Slide 731 Adapted from Bevans 2002 Empowerment Message Culture
  17. 17. Joining the poetry club <ul><li>“ John refused to wash or clean clothes, preferring to wear one outfit at a time until it needed replacing, then taking it off in a charity shop where he would collect a new one. John was a distinctive figure in town. He talked loudly and incessantly to himself as he walked about... [He] was an accomplished writer and poet, occasionally reading his work at mainstream social events. This opened up a new life for him where he was accepted, valued and admired and part of his local community. Thus, John found a social network tolerant enough to define him as an ‘‘artist’’ rather than a ‘‘mental health case’’. </li></ul>Forrester-Jones R & Barnes A (2008) On being a girlfriend not a patient: The quest for an acceptable identity amongst people diagnosed with a severe mental illness. Journal of Mental Health, April 2008; 17(2): 153 – 172. Quote from pages 161, 168. Slide 868
  18. 18. Are community groups welcoming? Slide 818 Judged welcoming – 561 visits in total

×