Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Corrosion Protection for Offshore Wind
Prevention and Aftercare: Meet the Industry Players
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
------...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Corrosion in offshore monopile foundations: Case studies reveal issues and solutions

467 views

Published on

Current research highlighted the problems of corrosion within monopile foundations and many wind farm operators have begun to retrofit existing monopile structures with internal cathodic protection while new offshore projects are increasingly installing internal cathodic protection as part of the design.
Do you want to know how the major market leaders are facing the challenge of corrosion prevention? Download the full article for free here: http://bit.ly/article_CorrosionMonopile

Published in: Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Corrosion in offshore monopile foundations: Case studies reveal issues and solutions

  1. 1. Corrosion Protection for Offshore Wind Prevention and Aftercare: Meet the Industry Players
  2. 2. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------- IQPC GmbH | Friedrichstr. 94 | D-10117 Berlin, Germany t: +49 (0) 30 2091 3 274 | f: +49 (0) 30 2091 3240 | e: eq@iqpc.de | w: www.iqpc.de Visit IQPC for a portfolio of topic-related events, congresses, seminars and conferences: www.iqpc.de Prevention and Aftercare Corrosion continues to be a huge issue in offshore wind, and one which could have a critical effect on the economic viability of the entire industry. Wind turbines are designed to have a lifespan of 20-25 years, but development is increasingly aimed at improving this life expectancy to 25-30 years and beyond. While wind energy is heavily subsidized by European governments as they try to facilitate a reduction in carbon emissions, at some point in the near future the wind industry must show that it can produce power at a comparable CoE to other sources of energy. The effects of corrosion were underestimated in early offshore turbine design, and while lessons can be learned from the oil and gas industries, there is a clear need for updated standards and guidelines for the very specific challenges of offshore wind turbines. These challenges include, but are not limited to, the problems arising from steel structures in shallow waters under extreme tide loads, and the cost of maintenance for wind farms, which unlike oil and gas stations, are primarily unmanned. A Growing Problem The most common form of foundation for wind turbines up to now has been the use of monopile structures, of which thousands have been installed in European waters. During the earliest installations no measures were taken to protect the internal surfaces of the monopile foundations from corrosion; partly to cut costs, but also on the assumption that the airtight compartments would starve the area of oxygen and thereby prevent corrosion. In recent years, with the benefit of data from inspections and surveys, there have been many unexpected corrosion related issues arise, particularly in relation to monopile structures. While external cathodic protection is generally well-understood and draws many parallels with existing offshore industries, internal protection and monitoring have become costly challenges, not least because working offshore in confined spaces presents many logistical and safety challenges.

×