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Automotive Cyber Security
How vulnerable are automakers to attack?
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Automotive Cyber Security: How vulnerable are automakers to attack?

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In 2013 when Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek hacked a Prius, many casual observers saw this as an extreme party trick: A mere two years later these same people watched in horror as several OEM’s were forced to admit system vulnerability as these hackers again grabbed centre stage.

Years later the pair remotely hacked a Jeep through the vehicle’s Harman Kardon radio and Uconnect computer, this initiated the first ever recall prompted by cyber-security concerns and affects 1.4 million vehicles.
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Finally the world understood: A malicious attacker leveraging a remote vulnerability could do anything from enabling a microphone for eavesdropping to turning the steering wheel to disabling the brakes.

It's not only American automakers that need to be worried, European brands are also highly vulnerable to attacks, to understand more about this critical topic Automotive IQ has written an exclusive free report.

>> Download the full report for free here: http://bit.ly/Article_AutomotiveCybersecurity

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Automotive Cyber Security: How vulnerable are automakers to attack?

  1. 1. Automotive Cyber Security How vulnerable are automakers to attack? Article
  2. 2. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------- IQPC GmbH | Friedrichstr. 94 | D-10117 Berlin, Germany t: +49 (0) 30 2091 3274 | f: +49 (0) 30 2091 3263 | e: eq@iqpc.de | w: www.iqpc.de Visit Automotive IQ for a portfolio of topic-related events, congresses and conferences: www.automotive-iq.com Manufacturers warned about vehicle vulnerability In 2013 when Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek hacked a Prius, many casual observers saw this as an extreme party trick: A mere two years later these same people watched in horror as several OEM’s were forced to admit system vulnerability as these hackers again grabbed centre stage. A year after hacking the Prius Miller and Valasek presented a ninety two page report at the 2014 Black Hat conference in Las Vegas which named twenty vehicles and brands that the pair deemed to be susceptible to attack. Each car’s rating was based on the vehicle’s attack surface, network architecture and “cyber physical”. These items are important determinants in a vehicles vulnerability profile: • The wireless ‘attack surface’ evaluates the range of features that can be hacked, and includes Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, mobile network connections, key fobs, and tyre pressure monitoring systems. • The network architecture is an indication of the ease of access these features give to the vehicle’s critical systems such as the steering and brakes. • Cyber physical relates to capabilities such as automated braking and parking sensors that could be controlled using wireless commands. The study rated the 2014 Jeep Cherokee and 2015 Cadillac Escalade the most vulnerable, whilst the 2010/ 2014 Toyota Prius and 2014 Infiniti Q50 were also deemed to be higher risk. Manufacturers’ overwhelming response to the original Prius attack was that this was in actual fact a minor vulnerability, as the hackers had to access the vehicles hardware and be in close proximity to the vehicle. In July 2015 Miller and Valasek set up a demonstration that shattered this perception and shook the automotive community.

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