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Fiona Sim - The role of the arts and creativity in PH

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PH Open Conference 2016

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Fiona Sim - The role of the arts and creativity in PH

  1. 1. The role of the arts and creativity in public health – now and in the future Dr Fiona Sim OBE, Chair, Royal Society for Public Health Belfast, 11th October 2016
  2. 2. • Policy context for Arts and Health • Background to RSPH contribution This Presentation • The scope and the evidence • RSPH Special Interest Group • Aesthetics and public health – a very brief case study • APPG
  3. 3. “The science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organised efforts of society.” “The science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organised efforts of society.” Donald Acheson, Public Health in England,1988 Public Health Definition Donald Acheson, Public Health in England,1988 “The science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organised efforts and informed choices of society, organisations, public and private, communities and individuals.” Derek Wanless, Securing good health for the whole population, 2004
  4. 4. •Health in all Policies – LGA 2016; WHO 2006, 2013 •APPG – launched Jan 2014 Recent Policy Context - England •Mental Health parity of esteem – Health & Social Care Act 2012 •Wider Public Health Workforce – DH, HEE, PHE, 2015 •Evidence- and Outcomes-based Commissioning – NHS England
  5. 5. The Royal Society for Public Health Policy Vision: everyone has the opportunity to optimise their health and wellbeing RSPH Qualifications ConferencesMembers Journals
  6. 6. •RSPH has long been a strong proponent of the capacity of the arts to improve health and wellbeing, and it has done much to identify and promote the excellent creative programmes that are happening across the UK •The RSPH’s annual Arts and Health Awards highlight outstanding UK projects, Contribution of RSPH to Arts and Health •The RSPH’s annual Arts and Health Awards highlight outstanding UK projects, recognizing organisations and individuals who have made significant contributions to research and practice •The journals and education programmes of the RSPH have focused on the growing arts and health movement: contributing to public health professionals, national and local government and the public now recognizing the contribution that the arts can make to a healthier society
  7. 7. •Theoretical perspectives, hypotheses •Research methods •Evaluation •Professional practice in creative arts, therapies medical/health humanities, health and wellbeing The Scope of Arts and Creativity in Public Health humanities, health and wellbeing •Building evidence for the contribution of the arts and creativity in the therapeutic environment – across the life course •Building evidence for public health interventions for health improvement •Local and national policy development
  8. 8. •Participatory arts programmes to deliver specified health outcomes. •Technology-based arts activities to deliver health outcomes. •Arts for public health engagement and education. •Arts for improving the health environment. •Arts to improve staff welfare and contribute to staff development. Nine Types of Arts in Health Activities – Source: Aesop Toolbox •Arts to improve staff welfare and contribute to staff development. •Arts to support system change. •Arts in psychotherapy. •Arts for expressing the experience of health and social care services. •Everyday arts activities with general health benefits.
  9. 9. Arts, Wellbeing and Health – the Evidence •Robust evidence base is central to validate the impact that the creative arts can have on supporting society •Emerging international evidence base of the benefits the arts can bring to health •Growing evidence of affordable benefit as well as efficacy: essential for commissioning within finite resources •Evidence that the creative arts have a positive effect on health and wellbeing across the lifespan •Evidence from different settings including hospitals, schools, community centres, workplace, care homes, and prisons
  10. 10. Oxford Textbook of Creative Arts, Health and Wellbeing, Eds Clift & Camic, 2016 Foreword from Shirley Cramer, Chief Executive, Royal Society for Public Health “This important book could not be more timely as it draws together the many strands of arts and health” “public health professionals, national and local government and the public now recognise the contribution that the arts can make to a healthier society” “This book underlines the importance of the evidence base to validate the impact that the creative arts can have on supporting society” “The role of the arts in improving the public’s health has gone mainstream, and we will be all the better for it”
  11. 11. Now in their 9th Year: The awards recognise and celebrate a wide range of activities, policies and strategies that empower communities and individuals, improve the population’s health and address the wider social determinants of RSPH Health and Wellbeing Awards – in association with Canterbury Christ Church University address the wider social determinants of health.
  12. 12. RSPH Health and Wellbeing Awards 2016 There are six categories representing the breadth and reach of public health projects and programmes: •Arts & Health Award •Community Health Development Award •Healthier Lifestyles Award•Healthier Lifestyles Award •Public Mental Health & Wellbeing Award •Technology & Health Innovation Award •Workplace Health & Wellbeing Award Winners are announced at an annual awards event celebrating achievement and best practice in public health and offering an excellent opportunity to network
  13. 13. Representation in our journals 1 Special issue in Perspectives in Public Health (2013) included papers on: • The effects of participating in creative activities on the health and well-being of children and young people: a rapid review • Promoting well-being through creativity: how arts and public• Promoting well-being through creativity: how arts and public health can learn from each other • Eudemonic well-being and community arts on prescription • Museums and art galleries as partners for public health interventions Forthcoming Special Issue in Perspectives in Public Health (2018) on Culture, Health and Wellbeing Numerous highly-cited papers published in both journals on Arts, Health and Wellbeing topics
  14. 14. Representation in our journals 2 Effects of participating in creative activities on the health and wellbeing of children and young people: a rapid review of the literature Perspectives in Public Health 2013; vol. 133, 1:44- 52.
  15. 15. Representation in our journals 3 Active music making: a route to enhanced subjective wellbeing among older people Perspectives in Public Health 2013 Vol 133 No 1. 36-43.
  16. 16. Representation in our journals 4 Meaningful activities for improving the wellbeing of people with dementia Perspectives in Public Health 2016 Vol 136 No 2. 99- 107.
  17. 17. Representation in our journals 5 The perceived effects of singing on the health and wellbeing of wives and partners ofand partners of members of the British Armed Forces: A cross- sectional survey. S. Clift, S. Page, N. Daykin, E. Peasgood. Public Health 2016; 138: 93-100.
  18. 18. RSPH Special Interest Group in Arts, Health and Wellbeing •RSPH has contributed over several years in supporting the development of the arts and health field in the UK •The SIG helps to support research, evidence-based practice and policy development in this vibrant field SIG Membership:SIG Membership: •Open to all RSPH members with an interest in the contribution the creative arts can make to wellbeing and health •Membership is international •>200 members of SIG to date
  19. 19. Aims of the Special Interest Group •Sharing current research and best practice •Organising conferences, seminars and workshops •Influencing government policy as a body of professional opinion
  20. 20. Arts, Health and Wellbeing upcoming conference 1 December 2016
  21. 21. Arts, Health and Wellbeing Conference 9-10 March 2017 The conference is an opportunity to hear about new research and to engage in lively discussions with researchers, artists, clinicians and people with dementia and caregivers: International keynote speakers, including from Universities of Wisconsin, Helslinki, and UCL Paper presentations and Roundtable discussions Workshops Art exhibition curated by people with dementia Film screening Closing plenary and time to explore the Wellcome Collection’s Hub, Created Out of Mind, a 2-year arts and sciences dementia residency, and meet their artists and researchers. Chair: Professor Paul M Camic, Canterbury Christ Church University
  22. 22. And now for something completely different ......... Think colour and aesthetics and a major new public health intervention
  23. 23. Cigarettes Plain Packaging •Colour selected for packs on basis of attractiveness / aesthetics •Selection evidence based - research in Australia•Selection evidence based - research in Australia •Colour: Pantone 448C = ‘opaque couché’ the world’s least desirable hue, a sludgy brown
  24. 24. Cigarettes – Plain Packaging
  25. 25. The All Party Parliamentary Group on Arts, Health and Wellbeing 1 The All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Arts, Health and Wellbeing was formed in January 2014 to: •Enable backbench parliamentarians, of all parties and in both Houses, to be informed about significant practice and developments in the field of the arts, health and wellbeing •Examine and discuss relevant government and opposition policies; contribute to the development of policydevelopment of policy •Enable Ministers and others in significant decision-making roles to make presentations and be questioned •Provide a forum for regular discussion between politicians and practitioners; •Provide a springboard for parliamentary action, such as debates and questions for oral and written answer •Work with other APPGs on areas of shared interest •Encourage the evaluation of arts and health work and the dissemination of evidence •Support sharing of knowledge and information about good practice and facilitate access to arts and health provision for the general public •Professor Paul Camic, FRSPH, nominated liaison between RSPH and APPG
  26. 26. The All Party Parliamentary Group on Arts, Health and Wellbeing 2 The APPG’s Inquiry 2015-17 The Inquiry is being conducted in two stages: 1. A series of 13 roundtable seminars have explored a range of themes and related policy areas, identify key issues and priorities (arts & health policy, commissioning, dementia, trauma & recovery, dying & bereavement, museums & health, health policy & devolution, arts on prescription, young people, mental health and the arts, the arts & healthcare environments, the arts & public health, evaluation & evidence). These involved practitioners,environments, the arts & public health, evaluation & evidence). These involved practitioners, researchers and service users from around the UK (completed in September 2016). RSPH contributed among many other organisations. 2. More focused meetings in 2016/17 in which expert witnesses can be questioned by parliamentary members of the APPG and ministers and officials invited to explain policy and to respond to and inform further policy recommendations (Select Committee model).
  27. 27. The All Party Parliamentary Group on Arts, Health and Wellbeing 3 Dissemination of outputs: A report with policy recommendations will be disseminated widely and form the basis for the APPG’s three-year plan (2017-2020). The report will be launched in parliament and then at the Culture, Health and Wellbeing International Conference in Bristol, 19-21 June 2017 (http://www.culturehealthwellbeing.org.uk/ ). In the autumn of 2017 there will be further dissemination of the report and findings in regionalIn the autumn of 2017 there will be further dissemination of the report and findings in regional seminars delivered by the National Alliance for Arts, Health and Wellbeing. Examples of Good Practice: The Inquiry has also set out a national call for examples of good practice and has received over 120 submissions. These are in process of being prepared as case studies, which will become an appendix to the report. Details of meeting minutes can be found here: http://www.artshealthandwellbeing.org.uk/APPG
  28. 28. Selected Resources • RSPH, 2013: Arts, Health & Wellbeing beyond the Millennium: https://www.rsph.org.uk/resourceLibrary/arts-health-and-wellbeing-beyond-the- millennium-how-far-have-we-come-and-where-do-we-want-to-go-.html • Perspectives in Public Health Special Issue January 2013 – Arts and Health: http://rsh.sagepub.com/cgi/collection/artshealth •What Works Wellbeing: http://whatworkswellbeing.org/ • Evaluation Framework, PHE, 2016. http://www.ae-sop.org/wp- content/uploads/2014/08/Aesop-PHE-Arts-in-health-evaluation-framework.pdf •Aesop [Arts Enterprise with a social purpose] Toolbox: http://www.ae- sop.org/toolbox/aesop-toolbox/ •National Alliance for Arts, Health and Wellbeing: http://www.artshealthandwellbeing.org.uk/
  29. 29. Further information •Membership of RSPH is open to anyone, anywhere, who has interest in improving population health www.rsph.org.uk @R_S_P_Hwww.rsph.org.uk @R_S_P_H •Further information on the RSPH Arts and Health Special Interest Group can be found at: https://www.rsph.org.uk/en/membership/specialinterest- groups/arts-and-health/
  30. 30. Thank You ©Dan Swerdlow 2010

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