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New ALERT - Teaching Infant CPR in the Pediatric Emergency Department

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Song JL (CHLA), Nager AL, Chang TP, Schmidt A, Stavroudis TL

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New ALERT - Teaching Infant CPR in the Pediatric Emergency Department

  1. 1. ALERT Presentation: Teaching Infant CPR in the Pediatric Emergency Department Joo Lee Song, M.D.; Alan Nager, M.D., M.H.A.; Todd Chang, M.D.; Anita Schmidt, M.P.H.; Theodora Stavroudis, M.D. Children’s Hospital Los Angeles INSPIRE @ IMSH 2016 – San Diego, CA / USA International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education
  2. 2. No prior study has been conducted that looks at VSI (Video Self- Instruction) infant CPR training completed in a pediatric emergency department setting. • Isbye et al.: Laypersons may learn BLS in 24 min using a personal resuscitation manikin (Resuscitation, 2005): compared BLS DVD/manikin vs. 6 hour course. Assessment after 3 months, equally effective. (Denmark) • Pierick et al.: Self-instructional CPR training for parents of high risk infants (Resuscitation, 2012): used AHA/AAP’s Infant CPR Anytime® Kit at the University of Iowa’s Children’s Hospital. – Completed questionnaires at 4 and 12 months. – Caregiver comfort increased over 12 months and parents continued to review the kit during the first year. International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education Background
  3. 3. • P: Caregivers of infant patients • I: Teaching infant CPR using “Infant CPR Anytime®” kits in the pediatric emergency department • C: The inpatient setting = Neonatal/Infant Critical Care Unit • O:  “Feasibility” of teaching based on:  Learner:  Education level, level of preparedness, receptiveness to learning (“teachability”) – (pre-intervention)  Value/Importance: Perceived need for individual, perceived societal need, beneficial skill – (pre and post-intervention)  Course:  Learner’s experience with disruptions, inattention, lack of completion (if applicable) – (post- intervention)  Learner’s reported level of satisfaction with course – (post-intervention)  “Effectiveness” of teaching based on  Objective measurements:  Knowledge – (pre and post-test)  Performance scores using Resusci® Baby QCPR® manikin – (pre and post-intervention)  Subjective measurements:  Learner’s comfort level with infant CPR – (pre and post-intervention)  Learner’s confidence with infant CPR – (pre and post-intervention) International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education PICO / Research Question
  4. 4. International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education Approach / Design ED Pre-Intervention Survey, Pre-Test & Pre-Intervention Simulation Score Post-Intervention Survey, Post-Test & Post-Intervention Simulation Score NICU Pre-Intervention Survey , Pre-Test & Pre-Intervention Simulation Score Post-Intervention Survey, Post-Test & Post-Intervention Simulation Score I I (Non-randomized, Two Groups)
  5. 5. • ALERT Presentation (January 16, 2016) • IRB Submission (January 2016) • Recruitment / Data Collection (March 2016 – March 2017) • Data Analysis (April 2017) • Abstract Presentation (June 2017) • Manuscript Preparation (July 2017) International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education Timeline
  6. 6. 1. What validated measurements of “feasibility” and “effectiveness” exist in the education literature? 2. With a study population with expected high drop-out rate, can the study be conducted without assessing retention? 3. What funding resources/opportunities are available pertinent to this study? International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education 3 questions to improve study
  7. 7. At INSPIRE @ IMSH 2016: -Evaluate study design and potential pitfalls In 2 months: -Make modifications to study design and submit IRB, begin recruitment International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education Goals to accomplish
  8. 8. Joo Lee Song, M.D. Children’s Hospital Los Angeles josong@chla.usc.edu / (323) 361-2109 International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education Contact Information

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