Blecic & Talu - input2012

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Ivan Blečić and Valentina Talu on "Pedestrian mobility as a fundamental urban right. The possible contribution of children to urban walkability"

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Blecic & Talu - input2012

  1. 1. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’ Pedestrian mobility as a fundamental urban rightThe possible contribution of children to urban walkability Ivan Blečić, ValentinaTalu TaMaLaCa Gruppo di ricerca e azione per la città dei diritti Laboratorio di Analisi e Modelli per la Pianificazione (LaMP) Dipartimento di Architettura, Design, Urbanistica dell’Università di Sassari
  2. 2. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’Contemporary city is a car-friendly city (1/3)1) road accidents2) air, noise and aesthetic pollution3) waste of time due to the traffic congestion4) privatisation of public spaces and soil consumption5) limitation of the urban rights for people who do not use a carAlagia, Chiusaroli, 2000; Baruzzi et al. 2004; Illich 2006; Labbucci 2011; Viale 2007; Ward 1979
  3. 3. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’Contemporary city is a car-friendly city (2/3)1) road accidents2) air, noise and aesthetic pollution3) waste of time due to the traffic congestion4) privatisation of public spaces and soil consumption5) limitation of the urban rights for people who do not use a car4) and 5) are perhaps the most relevant problems of "cars invasion" in urbancontexts.They can be handled only by reducing significantly the overall number of cars.Alagia, Chiusaroli, 2000; Baruzzi et al. 2004; Illich 2006; Labbucci 2011; Viale 2007; Ward 1979
  4. 4. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’Contemporary city is a car-friendly city (3/3)Drivers are consumers of space of all the inhabitants of the city: space "used" bycars could be "used" for collective activities, which can be done without a car.This cause a significant reduction of the urban quality of life, especially for thosepeople who cannot or do not want to drive:- children- elderly people- disabled people- pedestrians and cycliststhat cannot fully exercise their urban right of pedestrian accessibility andmovement.Illlich 2006; Viale 2007; Ward 1979
  5. 5. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’Pedestrian accessibility and movement: a fundamental urban right (1/3)The main goal of urban planning is probably to make the city capable of grantingequal urban rights for each inhabitant of the city.Therefore, urban planning must address this problem offering solutions andways to grant an effective exercise of the right to "use" the city (to access and tomove) for each individual, including pedestrians.
  6. 6. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’Pedestrian accessibility and movement: a fundamental urban right (2/3)The main goal of urban planning is probably to make the city capable of grantingequal urban rights for each inhabitant of the city.Therefore, urban planning must address this problem offering solutions andways to grant an effective exercise of the right to "use" the city (to access and tomove) for each individual, including pedestrians.Urban planning has to deal with the following issue:how can social learning be effectively enhanced to promote acultural change in peoples mobility behaviour?
  7. 7. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’Pedestrian accessibility and movement: a fundamental urban right (3/3)Until now, urban planning has mainly made reference and promoted the reasonsof environmental sustainability.The results are not satisfactory: most Italian cities are still hostile to pedestrians.Perhaps, the reasons for environmental sustainability are not as much effectivebecause they usually make reference to the effects of actions on the long run andon large spatial scales and to the “individual” contribution.We do think urban planning should concentrate more on the reasons of the rightto the cityElster 1993; Illich 2006; Labbucci 2011; Viale 2007
  8. 8. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’The reasons of the right to the city (1/4)Some people choose to be pedestrians for the reasons of the right to the city.They claim the right to "use" the city for everybody.Their goal is to free the streets and the public spaces from cars and to bring themback to pedestrians.People who promote and participate in collective actions like Critical Mass,Walking School Bus, Parking Day, etc. can be considered part of this category. 1 2 3 4Sassari – Critical Mass (1); Walking School Bus (2,3); Critical Walk (4)Labbucci 2011; Solnit 2005; Urbinati 2008
  9. 9. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’The reasons of the right to the city (2/4)They want to generate constructive conflict: to claim their right to "use" the city,they carry out actions which interfere with normal, established urban design.Walking is therefore a form of dissent against everything driving a car in the citymay mean: speed, consumption, privatisation, isolation, ...The fact that these actions are collective is fundamental: "being numerous"means "being visible" and consequently means acting in an effective manner.Labbucci 2011; Solnit 2005; Urbinati 2008
  10. 10. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’The reasons of the right to the city (3/4)Looking at the characteristics of these collective actions of (re)conquest of thestreets and the spaces of the city it is possible to make more effective policiesaimed at building walkable cities and thus promoting urban quality of life.We propose a sort of requirements list of collective initiatives making referenceto the reasons of the right to the city, which can be used as a starting point todesign policies aimed at improving pedestrians urban rights of accessibility andmobility.
  11. 11. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’The reasons of the right to the city (4/4)1. Constructive conflict, as an important process through which to reveal the nature of the problem, to denounce its negative effects, and to propose common possible solutions.2. Collectivity as a means for increasing visibility of the actions.3. Involvement of people who usually are not interested in or are not able to express their dissent.4. Simplicity of the initiatives and directness of their message.5. Acting in a playful manner as an element capable of facilitating peoples involvement and making the conflict more socially "acceptable" and thus, in a way, more effective.6. Plurality of ends, because all these initiatives are not aimed at promoting an exclusive use of the streets, which would be impracticable as well as dangerous, but a plurality of uses and users, including car drivers.7. Slowness as a way for making possible and improving social relations and peoples involvement .
  12. 12. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’An interesting example: Walking School BusThe Walking School Bus project is one possible project that could satisfy theserequirements, on condition that it is seen as a means for improving walkability inthe city, not simply as a means to go to school.The aim of the Walking School Bus is to create the conditions for making itselfuseless.This can happen only if Walking School Bus is seen as a transition project to asafe, accessible and walkable city: a goal which can be achieved only throughsignificant infrastructure redesign projects and a more efficient traffic controlsystem.
  13. 13. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’An interesting example: Walking School BusMonte Rosello, Sassari – School opening time
  14. 14. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’An interesting example: Walking School BusMonte Rosello, Sassari - Walking School Bus
  15. 15. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’An interesting example: Walking School BusMonte Rosello, Sassari – Street redesign project
  16. 16. TaMaLaCa tuttamialacitta’An interesting example: Walking School BusTo promote a walkable city is an important and urgent goals for urban planning.To promote a walkable city means, indeed, to promote a city that, in dealing withindividual differences (and not with standardisation caused by cars), aims atreducing inequalities in urban rights.
  17. 17. TaMaLaCatuttamialacitta’ Thank you for your attention! Ivan Blečić, ValentinaTalu gruppotamalaca@gmail.com www.tamalaca.uniss.it (in construction)

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