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Customers' Job To Be Done

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Customers' Job To Be Done

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Customers' Job To Be Done

  1. 1. 1   INNODYNBusiness Growth Development ® Customers’ Job To Be Done
  2. 2. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   Ex:  Why  do  customers  buy/use  hammers?   •  The  provider's  view  is  that  customers  need  a  hammer   to  exert  controlled  blunt  force  on  some  object  (Ex:  a   nail)  –  a  customer  centric  view.   •  The  customer’s  view  is  that  a  hammer  is  the  means  to   get  a  “job”  done  (Ex:  hang  a  picture)  –                                                                           a  job  centric  perspec2ve   2  
  3. 3. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  From  the  producers  perspec2ve,  the  hammer  is  a   product  with  with  features  and  benefits   •  But,  from  the  customer’s  perspec2ve,  the  hammer  is   a  point-­‐in-­‐9me  solu%on  that  enables  them  to  get  a   certain  job  done   3  
  4. 4. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  Customers  have  “jobs”  that  arise  regularly  that  they   need  to  get  done.     •  Customers  set  out  to  “hire”  something  or  someone   to  do  the  job  as  effec2vely,  conveniently  as  possible   at  the  least  cost.   4  
  5. 5. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   Jobs  To  Be  Done   Old  Solu%on   New  Solu%on   Search  for  informa2on   Library   Internet   Detect  enemy  at  night   Flares   Night  vision   Make  many  products  for  mass  Market   Many  crasmen   Produc2on  line   Ingest  medicine   Pills  and  shots   Skin  patches   Execute  basic  legal  func2ons   Lawyers   Legalzoom.com   Keep  windows  clean   Clean  with  Squeegee   Self-­‐cleaning  glass   Clean  teeth   Manual  brushing   Automated  with  sound  waves   •  All  products  are  “point  in  2me”  solu2ons.   •  Customers  will  always  migrate  to  solu2ons  that  will  help   them  get  a  job  done  beber.   •  The  products  change  due  to  the  evolu2on  of  technology,   but  the  jobs  are  stable  over  long  periods  of  2me.  
  6. 6. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   6   “People  don’t  buy  quarter  inch  drills;   they  buy  quarter-­‐inch  holes.  The  drill   just  happens  to  be  the  best  means   available  to  get  that  job  done”.   Theodore  Levib   Origina2on  of  the  JTBD  Concept   Harvard  Business  School  Professor  
  7. 7. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  Most  of  the  2me  customers  must  do  mul2ple  smaller   jobs  to  get  a  Big  Job  done.   7   Big  Job   Suppor2ng   Job   Suppor2ng   Job   Suppor2ng   Job   Suppor2ng   Job  
  8. 8. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   Types  of  customer  Jobs     (provider  perspec2ve)   8   Suppor2ng   Jobs   Related Jobs Adjacent Jobs Update EMR System Expand Knowledge Manage Finances Software Medical Equipment Procedures Train StaffProvider Suppor2ng   Jobs  
  9. 9. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   Suppor%ng  Jobs   •  All  the  jobs  that  are  required  to  do  a  big  job.     •  If  any  required  suppor2ng  job  is  missing,  then  the  big   job  cannot  be  done.   •  The  suppor2ng  jobs  collec2vely                                                                                     define  how  the  big  job  gets  done.     9  
  10. 10. 10   Supporting Jobs Big Job Related Jobs Adjacent Jobs Describe a big job that your organization currently helps the customer do via your solution. STEP 1: Categorize the supporting jobs as either related to or adjacent to the job that you already help the customer do via your solution. STEP 2: STEP 3: List all the supporting jobs that are necessary to get the big job done. Related jobs and adjacent jobs are types of supporting jobs.NOTE:
  11. 11. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   Related  Jobs   •  Customer  jobs  that  have  similar  characteris2cs  to  a  job  that  a  provider  is   already  helping  the  customer  get  done.  Take,  for  example  a  provider  that   offers  a  solu2on  for  maintaining  landing  gear  on  commercial  airplanes.  Other   related  jobs  include  maintaining  the  exterior  of  the  plane,  maintaining  the   interior  of  the  plane,  and  maintaining  ground  support  equipment.  Because  a   provider  already  has  a  core  competence  in  mechanical  aircra  maintenance,   they  may  be  able  to  help  the  airline  do  the  other  plane  maintenance  jobs   more  effec2vely/efficiently  than  they  are  currently  doing  via  the  other   maintenance  providers.     Adjacent  Jobs   •  Customer  jobs  that  do  not  have  similar  characteris2cs  as  the  job  that  a   provider  is  already  helping  the  customer  get  done.  For  example,  the  JTBD  of  of   training  pilots  is  not  at  all  similar  to  the  JTBD  of  maintaining  landing  gear.   These  two  jobs  require  completely  different  resources  and  competences.   11  
  12. 12. 12   Help me transport passengers safely to their destinations Help me keep my airplanes in good operating condition Help me train Pilots Help me staff planes with competent crew Help me maintain the landing gear Help me maintain the engine Help me train flight attendants Help me hire qualified pilots Help me maintain the exterior of the plane Help me train ground crew Help me maintain good ground support Help me maintain ground support equipment Help me hire qualified flight attendants Help me maintain the interior of the plane Help me hire qualified ground crew Relatd Jobs Adjacent Jobs Customer: Commercial Airline Provider: Airplane maintenance company Currently provides landing gear maintenance JTBD Supporting JobsSupporting Jobs Example  
  13. 13. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   13   BIG JOB JTBD JTBD JTBD JTBD JTBD JTBD JTBD JTBD JTBD Related Jobs Provider Adjacent Jobs A  More  Generic   View   ?   ? ?  
  14. 14. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   14   Plan Select Determine DEFINE Gather Access Retrieve LOCATE Set up Organize Examine PREPARE Validate Prioritize Decide CONFIRM Store Finish Close CONCLUDE Update Adjust Maintain MODIFY Verify Track Check MONITOR Perform Transact Administer EXECUTE Troubleshoot Restore Fix RESOLVE Universal  Job  Map  (Customer’s  Point  of  View)  JTBD
  15. 15. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  A  job  map  depicts  how  a  provider  does  a  job  as  a  number   of  process  steps   •  Unlike  a  tradi2onal  process  map,  a  job  map  does  not   show  what  the  customer  is  doing  (an  ac2vity  view)   •  Rather,  it  describes  what  the  customer  is  trying  to  get   done  (a  jobs  view).     15  
  16. 16. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   16   Structure of a Job Statement (Action verb) (Object of action) (Contextual clarifier) Clean clothes at home Manage personal finances at home A  job  statement  is  necessary  to  describe  a  JTBD  
  17. 17. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  Using  the  job  to  be  done  as  a  lens,  it  becomes  apparent   that  customers  are  oen  trying  to  perform  mul2ple  tasks   simultaneously  to  get  a  big  job  done.   17   •  However,  many  providers   tend  to  focus  their   products  on  a  single   suppor2ng  job  (or  just  a   few  tasks).  
  18. 18. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  Customer  usually  have  to  cobble  together  lots  of   incompa2ble  solu2ons  in  order  to  get  the  en2re  job   done   •  They  are  always  looking                                                                                  for   solu2ons  that  can                                                                                        help  them   get  a  big  job                                                                                              more   effec2vely   – Less  2me,  less  effort,                                                                                      less   less  cost,  etc.   18  
  19. 19. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   Dimensions  of  Customer  Jobs   19   Tasks  people   seek  to   accomplish   The  way   people  want   to  feel   How  people   want  to  be   perceived  by   others   Functional Jobs Emotional Jobs Personal Social Ex:  When  buying  a  car,  a  person  wants  to  transport  themselves   from  one  place  to  another  (func%onal  job),  but  also  may  want   feel  successful  while  driving  (personal  job)  and  be  perceived  as   abrac2ve  by  others  (social  job).   Important   for  Design  &   Marke%ng   Phase  
  20. 20. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   Q:  How  does  the  Job-­‐to-­‐be-­‐done  become  a   priority  in  the  mind  of  the  customer?   20   Personal  &   Organiza2onal   Values   Trends   Big  Job   Related  Jobs  Adjacent  Jobs   Priority  
  21. 21. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   21   Contact service provider and/or access service Define and/or communicate service needs Evaluate and/or select service options Confirm and/or finalize service plan Adjust service plan and/or its execution Contact service provider and/or access service Get questions answered and/ or problems resolved Evaluate and/or monitor service delivery Fulfill customer responsibilities Receive Service Initiate service delivery Pay for service Trends  can  also  make  a  related  job  or  adjacent   job  more  (or  less)  of  a  priority.  
  22. 22. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   Customer  Demand:  Where  Does  it  Originate?   •  Customer  demand  begins  with  an  awareness  of  needing   to  a  job  done     •  The  func2onal,  emo2onal,   and  social  dimensions  of   the  jobs  that  customers   need  to  get  done  cons2tute   the  circumstances  that   mo2vate  them  to  seek  out   solu2ons   22  
  23. 23. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  Discovering  customer  jobs  that  aren’t  gerng  done  very   well  gives  a  provider  a  much  clearer  roadmap  for   innova2ng  successful  products.   •  A  jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐done  perspec2ve  is  the  only  way  to  see   accurately  what  products  customers  will  value  in  the   future,  and  why.   23  
  24. 24. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  The  jobs  to  be  done  concept   can  be  used  as  a  way  to   categorize  markets  based  on   customer  circumstances.   24   Defining  Markets  In  a  Different  Way   •  The  way  a  provider  defines  its’                                                                           market  influences  which  products                                                                                           it  develops,  the  design  of  those  products,  and  the   marke2ng  of  those  products.   §  Defines  who  is  framed  as  compe2tor  and  how  large   specific  market  opportuni2es  are  believed  to  be.  
  25. 25. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  Segmen2ng  markets  by  product  type,  by  price  point,  by   customer  behavior,  demographics,  and  psychographics   oen  lead  providers  to  aim  their  new  products  at   phantom  targets.     25   •  Providers  focus  on  the   abributes  of  products  and   customers  rather  than  the   jobs  that  customers  are   trying  to  get  done.  
  26. 26. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  Problem:  product  and  customer  characteris2cs  are   poor  predictors  of  customer  demand   26   •  Customers’  buying  decisions   rarely  conform  to  the   “average”  customer  in  their   demographic;  customers  do   not  they  confine  their  search   for  solu2ons  within  a  defined   product  category.    
  27. 27. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   Job-­‐based  view  vs.  conven%onal  needs-­‐based  view   •  A  jobs-­‐based  view  focuses  on  the  circumstance  itself,   whereas  a  needs-­‐based  view  focuses  on  the  customer  as   the  unit  of  analysis.     •  Needs-­‐based  analyses  oen  fails  to  ask  the  fundamental   “why”  ques2on.  If  you  don’t  understand  the  root  of  the   need,  you  risk  targe2ng  the  wrong  problem.   27   Fools  Gold  
  28. 28. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  A  product  stands  lible  chance  of  success  if  it  requires   customers  to  priori2ze  jobs  they  haven’t  cared  about  in   the  past.     •  Customers  don’t  just  “change  jobs”  because  a  new   product  becomes  available.  Rather,  a  new  product  will   succeed  to  the  extent  it  helps  customers  accomplish   more  effec2vely  and  conveniently  what  they’re  already   trying  to  do.     28  
  29. 29. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  Innova2ons  that  make  it  easier  for  customers  to  do  what   they  weren’t  already  trying  to  get  done  compete  against   customers’  priori2es.  This  is  very  hard  to  do.   29  
  30. 30. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  Define  customers  as  job  executors   •  Define  your  markets  around  the  job  to  be   done   •  Help  customers  get  the  en2re  job  done   •  Help  customers  get  more  jobs  done   •  Target  those  who  will  pay  the  most  to  get  the   job  done  best   30  
  31. 31. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   31   For  innova2on,  how  do  we  know  what   customers  want?   Or  horse  carriage?  
  32. 32. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   32   •  Providers  oen  do  not  get  a  complete  and  accurate  picture  of   what  [new]  solu2ons  customers  want.   •  Conven2onal  VOC  methods  seek  to  capture  the  abributes  and   characteris2cs  that  customer  want  or  value  in  exis2ng  solu2ons.   •  For  the  purpose  of  innova%on,  we  want  to  know  the  criteria   that  customers  use  to  define  the  successful  execu2on  of  a  job,   not  not  desired  characteris9cs  of  a  solu9on.  
  33. 33. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  Customers  not  only  want  to  get  the  job  done,  but  they   also  want  to  be  able  to  do  it  more  effec2vely,   conveniently,  or  less  expensively.     •  Yet  to  define  just  what  “more  effec2vely”  or  “more   conveniently”  means,  customers  have  a  set  of  that   define  how  they  want  to  get  the  job  done,  and  what  it   means  to  get  the  job  done  perfectly.     33  
  34. 34. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  Just  as  Providers  use  metrics  to  evaluate  the  output   quality  of  a  business  process,  customers  use  metrics  to   measure  the  successful  comple2on  of  a  job.   •  Customers  have  these  metrics  in  their  minds,  but  they   seldom  ar2culate  them,  and  companies  rarely   understand  them.     •  These  metrics  are  the  customers’  desired  outcomes  and   they  represent  the  customers’  needs  with  respect  to   gerng  a  job  done.   34  
  35. 35. 35  
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  38. 38. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   Customer  Desired  Outcomes  Vs.  Func%onal  Requirements   •  Desired  outcomes:  solu2on  free  value  criteria  that   defines  the  perfect  execu2on  of  JTBDs.   –  Minimize  the  2me  it  takes  to  clean  clothes   •  Func%onal  requirements:  solu2on-­‐specific  performance   characteris2cs   –  Candle  burn  2me  (target  =  32  hours)   –  PC  babery  life  (target  =  8  hours)   38  
  39. 39. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   39  Job Importance JobSatisfaction 0 0 6 7 8 9 1054321 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Gold Silver Bronze Small Growth Possibilities Smaller Very Small So Watch the Trends! Trends can shift these jobs into an opportunity zones JTBD Opportunity Zones Priori2zing  JTBDs  
  40. 40. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   JTBD  Growth  Strategies   •  Core  Growth  –  target  unmet  needs  within  current   product  plaworms   •  Related  Job  Growth     •  Adjacent  Job  Growth   •  Acquire  non  customers  by  removing  constraint  on   consump9on  (applies  to  others)   40   •  Disrup2ve  Growth  –  target   under  served  or  over  served   customers  that  are  using   exis2ng  solu2ons    
  41. 41. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  Steps   Needed  inputs:  growth  target,  trends  analysis,  strategic  competencies   Step  1:  Describe  a  Big  Job  that  your  organiza2on  can  help  a  customer   get  done  (or  that  you  are  already  helping  get  done).   Step  2:  List  the  suppor2ng  jobs  that  are  necessary  to  get  the  Big  Job   done  (ar2culate  job  statements  and  indicate  hierarchical   rela2onships  among  suppor2ng  jobs).   Step  3:  Categorize  the  suppor2ng  jobs  as  either  related  or  adjacent  to   the  provider’s  exis2ng  solu2ons  (or  intended  future  solu2ons).   Step  4:  Priori2ze  the  JTBD  opportuni2es  based  trends  analysis  and   strategic  competencies   Step  5:  Choose  a  JTBD  growth  strategy   41  
  42. 42. Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐Done  &  Demand  Crea2on   2014,  INNODYN,  LLC   •  Jobs-­‐to-­‐be-­‐done  theory  explains  why  customers  seek  out   market  solu2ons  and  the  value  criteria  they  use  to   evaluate  solu2ons.   •  However,  JTBD  theory  does  not  explicate  actual   customer  demand  in  the  context  of  a  compe22ve   market.   42   •  Need  a  way  to  explain  why  a   customer  selects  a  certain   solu2on  from  other   compe22ve  solu2ons  available   to  them  in  the  market.  

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