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CIB TG-66 Country Report:Building Energy Codes & Standards in the United States Darren B. Meyers, PE, CEM, GBE Technical D...
Subject Topics Relevant Regulations, Policies and Implementation    The Role of Congress    The Roles of U.S. DOE and U.S...
U.S. Energy Flow 2009ARRA for North Texas ICC   Handout #   3
Why Building Energy Codes?Source, Energy Information Administration Handout #         4
Emissions Situation 2010ARRA for North Texas ICC   Handout #     5
The Role of U.S. Congress Federal Powers Act                            Energy Policy Act 1992 Energy Policy & Conserva...
Energy Policy & Conservation Act 1975               First Major Piece of EE Legislation Macroeconomic Shock! 1973-74 oil ...
Energy Conservation & Production Act               1977 (ECPA - 42 USC 6833) Establishes -10% goal 1985 over 1975 baselin...
The Role of U.S. DOE Energy Conservation and Production Act, §304   Updating State building energy efficiency codes DOE...
Energy Policy Act 1992 (PL 102-486)                   The New Paradigm Macroeconomic Shock! Persian Gulf War, also known ...
Energy Policy Act 1992                   The New Paradigm Among the provisions     Section 801     Directs the U.S. EPA...
Energy Policy Act 2005 Macroeconomic Shock!   Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub.L. 109-58) Pa...
The Role of U.S. EPA Clean Air Act of 1963, 1970, 1990 Describes one of a number of pieces of legislation  relating to t...
Montreal Protocol (1987-89)                   on Substances That Deplete                   the Ozone Layer An internation...
EPA Endangerment Finding (15 DEC 09) April 2, 2007, landmark Supreme Court decision in Massachusetts v. EPA. April 2, 20...
The Role of Model Code and         Standard Development Organizations Residential/Commercial Energy Code – IECC   3-year...
International Energy Conservation Code “The national model energy code of choice” for U.S. cities and states that  adopt ...
U.S. Residential Energy CodeHistory of Efficiency Improvements            Handout #
Handout #
U.S. Commercial Energy CodeHistory of Efficiency Improvements                        2001 IECC                            ...
Handout #
The Role of State and          Local Governments Energy code adoptions left to the states, and in  instances, the cities,...
Other Developments in Sustainable &High-Performance Buildings         Handout #
Energy Independence & Security Act of 2007                  (DOE Office of High-Performance Green Buildings)Significant En...
American Recovery & Reinvestment Act         How does the Recovery Act help? The Recovery Act contains language requiring...
Energy Efficiency Community Block Grants        (EECBG) Authorized by Energy Independence & Security  Act of 2007 and fun...
ARRA                The Recovery Act’s 90% Compliance Metric Use a statistically-valid sample (population-based)   44± B...
Sample Generator                   90% ComplianceSignificant Energy Legislation   Handout #   28
Sample Composition                   90% ComplianceSignificant Energy Legislation   Handout #   29
Voluntary, Above-Code Programs Predominant U.S. voluntary programs: Direct comparisons to target codes (IECC, 90.1) will...
ICC Green CodeProject UpdateInternational Green Construction Code
Thank You!For more information and updates     check the ICC website www.iccsafe.org
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CIB TG66 North America Webinar 2010-10-12 2 Darren B Meyers

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The North American session of the international webinar series,"THE IMPLEMENTATION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS POLICIES IN 5 CONTINENTS" was held on October 12, 2010 9:00 am, Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00).

The agenda for the free 2-hour webinar was:

· North America: Public and Private Measures for Fostering the Adaptation of Green Building Practices, Jonathan Westeinde, Chair, Green Building Advisory Group, North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation

· United States: Country Report on Building Energy Codes & Standards Regulation in the United States, Darren B. Meyers, Technical Director, Energy Programs, International Code Council

· Canada: Canadian Energy Efficient Building Policies, James Clark, Buildings Division, Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resources Canada

· Mexico: Toward Energy Efficiency in Housing in Mexico, Evangelina Hirata, Consultant on Energy Efficiency in Housing

· United States: Beyond the Code -- Energy, Carbon, and Cost Savings using Conventional Building Technologies, Joshua Kneifel, Economist, National Institute of Standards and Technology

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CIB TG66 North America Webinar 2010-10-12 2 Darren B Meyers

  1. 1. CIB TG-66 Country Report:Building Energy Codes & Standards in the United States Darren B. Meyers, PE, CEM, GBE Technical Director – Energy Programs October 12th, 2010
  2. 2. Subject Topics Relevant Regulations, Policies and Implementation The Role of Congress The Roles of U.S. DOE and U.S. EPA The Role of Model Code and Standard Development Organizations The Role of State and Local Governments Relevant Codes and Standards Commercial Buildings (ASHRAE 90.1-2007 and IECC 2009) Residential Buildings (IECC 2009, and IRC 2009 Chapter 11) Other Developments in Sustainable High-Performance Buildings The Roles of U.S. DOE and U.S. EPA The Role of Model Code and Standard Development Organizations The Role of Voluntary Above-Code Programs Significant Energy Legislation Handout # 2
  3. 3. U.S. Energy Flow 2009ARRA for North Texas ICC Handout # 3
  4. 4. Why Building Energy Codes?Source, Energy Information Administration Handout # 4
  5. 5. Emissions Situation 2010ARRA for North Texas ICC Handout # 5
  6. 6. The Role of U.S. Congress Federal Powers Act  Energy Policy Act 1992 Energy Policy & Conservation  Clean Air Act & Amendments Act 1975  Climate Change Action Plan Energy Conservation & 1993 Production Act 1977  Montreal Protocol National Energy Conservation  Ozone Depletion Factor Policy Act 1978  CFC’s, HCFC’s and HFC’s Omnibus Reconciliation Act  Natural Gas Policy Act 1985  Energy Policy Act 1995 Federal Energy Management &  Energy Independence and Improvement Act 1988 Security Act 2007  ARRA Significant Energy Legislation Handout # 6
  7. 7. Energy Policy & Conservation Act 1975 First Major Piece of EE Legislation Macroeconomic Shock! 1973-74 oil embargo President Gerald Ford signed the legislation on December 22, 1975, setting the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) into motion. Directs President to:  Develop standards for agency procurement policies w.r.t. energy efficiency  Develop a 10-yr plan for energy conservation in Federal buildings ARRA for North Texas ICC Handout # 7
  8. 8. Energy Conservation & Production Act 1977 (ECPA - 42 USC 6833) Establishes -10% goal 1985 over 1975 baseline Coupled w/ DOE Organization Act 1977  Energy issues previously administered by independent Agencies  Federal Power Commission, renamed FERC  Atomic Energy Commission, renamed NRC Major impetus in energy planning and coordination  “Energy crisis" of mid-1970’s, OPEC Oil Embargo (October 1973)  Congressional concern focused on matters of energy reliability, environmental protection, reasonable prices, economic stability, and national security. ARRA for North Texas ICC Handout # 8
  9. 9. The Role of U.S. DOE Energy Conservation and Production Act, §304  Updating State building energy efficiency codes DOE required to conduct a “determination”  Whether model code (IECC) when published  Whether standard (ASHRAE 90.1) when published If new code improves efficiency, states have 2 years:  adopt the commercial energy code or one equally stringent  consider adoption residential code and inform DOE of intentions No penalties for non-compliance; BUT also no $$$ !!! Handout #
  10. 10. Energy Policy Act 1992 (PL 102-486) The New Paradigm Macroeconomic Shock! Persian Gulf War, also known as the First Gulf War (2 August 1990 – 28 February 1991) Comprehensively addressed:  (Title I) Energy efficiency, energy conservation and energy management,  (Title II) Natural gas imports and exports,  (Title III-V) Alternative fuels and requiring certain fleets to acquire alternative fuel vehicles, which are capable of operating on nonpetroleum fuels  (Title VI) Electric motor vehicles,  (Title VIII) Radioactive waste,  (Title VII) Amended parts of Federal Power Act of 1935  (Title XIII) Coal power and clean coal,  (Title XII) Renewable energy, and other issues Significant Energy Legislation Handout # 10
  11. 11. Energy Policy Act 1992 The New Paradigm Among the provisions  Section 801  Directs the U.S. EPA to promulgate radiation protection standards for the Yucca Mountain repository. Impacts  Electric power deregulation,  Building codes,  1992 – 1993 CABO MEC  ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1989  Energy Star (regulating energy efficient consumer products) Significant Energy Legislation Handout # 11
  12. 12. Energy Policy Act 2005 Macroeconomic Shock! Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub.L. 109-58) Passed by the Congress JUL 29, 2005, and signed into law by President George W. Bush AUG 8, 2005. A further attempt to combat growing energy problems, changed US energy policy by providing tax incentives and loan guarantees for energy production and efficiency measures. Significant Energy Legislation Handout # 12
  13. 13. The Role of U.S. EPA Clean Air Act of 1963, 1970, 1990 Describes one of a number of pieces of legislation relating to the reduction of smog and air pollution. Used by governments to enforce clean air standards Contributed to an improvement in human health and longer life spans. Led to use of atmospheric dispersion models, including point source models, roadway air dispersion models and aircraft air pollution models in order to analyze air quality impacts. Significant Energy Legislation Handout # 13
  14. 14. Montreal Protocol (1987-89) on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer An international treaty designed to protect the ozone layer by phasing out the production of a number of substances believed to be responsible for ozone depletion.  CFC’s, HCFC’s and HFC’s  Ozone Depletion Factor Opened for signature on SEP 16, 1987 in force on JAN 1, 1989  First meeting in Helsinki, May 1989. Since then…  Seven revisions, in 1990 (London), 1991 (Nairobi), 1992 (Copenhagen), 1993 (Bangkok), 1995 (Vienna), 1997 (Montreal), and 1999 (Beijing). Due to its widespread adoption and implementation the ozone layer is expected to recover by 2050. Perhaps the single most successful international agreement to date has been the Montreal Protocol” Significant Energy Legislation Handout # 14
  15. 15. EPA Endangerment Finding (15 DEC 09) April 2, 2007, landmark Supreme Court decision in Massachusetts v. EPA. April 2, 2008, MA, D.C. and 17 states, along with NY City and Baltimore in amicus curiae, filed a petition for mandamus with U.S. Court of Appeals in the D.C. Circuit seeking to compel EPA to act on remand within sixty days. In Massachusetts, the Supreme Court found that GHG’s are “pollutants” under the CAA, EPA Endangerment Finding:  On December 15, 2009, EPA published the final endangerment and cause or contribute findings for GHGs under section 202(a) of the CAA.  A mix of atmospheric concentrations of six key GHG’s threatens the public health and welfare of current and future generations.  GHG’s are: carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydro fluorocarbons (HFCs), per fluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Significant Energy Legislation Handout # 15
  16. 16. The Role of Model Code and Standard Development Organizations Residential/Commercial Energy Code – IECC  3-year development cycle (2009, 2012, 2015, etc.)  ICC administers code change process and does not advocate specific energy policies or goals  Proposals must pass a Code Development Committee and then final action votes by U.S. code enforcement officials Commercial Energy Standard – ASHRAE 90.1  3-year development cycle (2007, 2010, 2013, etc.) on a “continuous maintenance” basis  ASHRAE develops according to ANSI “consensus” procedures and advocates for energy goals with U.S. DOE  Proposals referred to technical subcommittees for approval and then to full SSPC 90.1 Handout #
  17. 17. International Energy Conservation Code “The national model energy code of choice” for U.S. cities and states that adopt codes. Continues to emphasize both prescriptive and performance-related provisions for both commercial and residential buildings. Performance criteria for residential and commercial energy efficiency using simulated energy analysis is also addressed. Cited throughout Federal law for national, private, and public housing initiatives. Basis for federal tax credits for energy efficient homes, standards for federal and manufactured housing. Under federally insured EEM programs (FHA and VA) and the conventional mortgage market (Fannie Mae Freddie Mac), homes meeting IECC help borrowers qualify for larger loans. 2009 IECC Update Webinar 17 Handout # 1
  18. 18. U.S. Residential Energy CodeHistory of Efficiency Improvements Handout #
  19. 19. Handout #
  20. 20. U.S. Commercial Energy CodeHistory of Efficiency Improvements 2001 IECC 2003 IECC 2006 IECC 2009 IECC 2012 IECC Handout #
  21. 21. Handout #
  22. 22. The Role of State and Local Governments Energy code adoptions left to the states, and in instances, the cities, towns and jurisdictions:  Legislative/administrative updates on regular/irregular basis  Model code adoptions may be with state amendments  Some states develop their own energy codes (CA, WA, FL) Code enforcement left to local jurisdictions  Life-safety and public health issues often take precedence  Continuing education and budget constraints  Thus, energy code implementation and enforcement is uneven across states Handout #
  23. 23. Other Developments in Sustainable &High-Performance Buildings Handout #
  24. 24. Energy Independence & Security Act of 2007 (DOE Office of High-Performance Green Buildings)Significant Energy Legislation Handout # 24
  25. 25. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act How does the Recovery Act help? The Recovery Act contains language requiring a plan to adopt  2009 IECC or better-residential; and  2007 ASHRAE 90.1 or better-commercial; A condition for qualifying for $ 3.1 billion in State Energy Program funds  Stimulus also funds EISA Block Grants, which has specific language authorizing grants to develop, implement and adopt and enforce, building codes among others Handout #
  26. 26. Energy Efficiency Community Block Grants (EECBG) Authorized by Energy Independence & Security Act of 2007 and funded by ARRA  $2.7 Billion in formulaically-allocated grants  $455 Million in competitively-bid grants Eligibility requirements  Cities >35,000 pop.  Counties >200,000 pop. or one of ten largest in your State  Complete listing at: http://www.eecbg.energy.gov/grantalloc.htm Handout #
  27. 27. ARRA The Recovery Act’s 90% Compliance Metric Use a statistically-valid sample (population-based)  44± Buildings per State in four population-categories:  New Residential  New Commercial  Residential renovations  Commercial renovations Target Benchmarks  2009 IECC for Residential  ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial 90% compliance need only be demonstrated once ARRA for North Texas ICC Handout # 27
  28. 28. Sample Generator 90% ComplianceSignificant Energy Legislation Handout # 28
  29. 29. Sample Composition 90% ComplianceSignificant Energy Legislation Handout # 29
  30. 30. Voluntary, Above-Code Programs Predominant U.S. voluntary programs: Direct comparisons to target codes (IECC, 90.1) will not be performed. 30
  31. 31. ICC Green CodeProject UpdateInternational Green Construction Code
  32. 32. Thank You!For more information and updates check the ICC website www.iccsafe.org

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