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Gareth
Niblett,
BCS
ISSG
Legal
Day,
22nd
January
2010

I
am
not
a
lawyer,
but
I
know
enough
to
want
to

cover
myself…

Any
information
provided
is
simply
my
view,
which

comes
f...
  Part
I,
Chapter
I

     Intelligence
Agencies,
with
NTAC
as
central
focus

  Part
I,
Chapter
II

     Around
650
Pub...
  Part
I,
Chapter
I

    Raw
voice
or
data
in
real‐time

  Part
I,
Chapter
II

  Have
                      Want
      ...
  Part
I,
Chapter
I

    ▪  Interests
of
National
Security

    ▪  Prevention
or
detection
of
serious
crime

    ▪  Safeg...
  Part
I,
Chapter
II

          RIPA
    Purpose
                         Amount

          22(2)a
 Interests
of
National...
  Part
I,
Chapter
I

     Warrant
signed
by
Home
Secretary,
or
designate,

    is
served
on
a
Communications
Service
Pro...
  Part
I,
Chapter
II

         80%

         70%

         60%

         50%

          40%

          30%

          20%...
  Part
I,
Chapter
II

  Intelligence
use
of
RIPA

  Part
I,
Chapter
II

  Questions
welcome,
either
now
or
later.





  More
of
me:

   ▪  Blog
–
www.infosecmaven.org

   ▪  Twitter
–
www.twi...
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RIPA: Perception and Practice

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There has been much discussion in the media and elsewhere about the use and misuse of the powers granted to many public authorities under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 and associated legislation.

Stories about snooping on people for trying to get their children into a particular school or letting their dogs foul the street may make the front page, but they are not necessarily representative of how the powers are used in general.

Sure, they should lead to questions about the implementation and effectiveness of the necessity and proportionality tests that are a mandatory part of the legislation, but there may be greater things to concern ourselves with when law enforcement and the intelligence community wish to grow and extend the use of data retention, monitoring and surveillance.

This talk will give an overview of many years of practical experience and interactions with the public authorities authorised to seek access to information under RIPA, Part I, Chapters I and II.

Published in: Technology
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RIPA: Perception and Practice

  1. 1. Gareth
Niblett,
BCS
ISSG
Legal
Day,
22nd
January
2010

  2. 2. I
am
not
a
lawyer,
but
I
know
enough
to
want
to
 cover
myself…
 Any
information
provided
is
simply
my
view,
which
 comes
from
many
years
experience
with
RIPA
and
 related
areas,
from
the
original
draft
Bill
through
to
 being
being
responsible
for
lawful
intercept,
data
 retention
and
disclosure
for
voice
&
data
services.
 It
may
differ
from
the
views
and
experience
of
 others.
A
lot
of
information
has
been
left
out.
 Figures
are
from
many
sources,
may
be
out
of
date,
 rounded,
deliberately
imprecise,
or
simply
wrong.

  3. 3.   Part
I,
Chapter
I
   Intelligence
Agencies,
with
NTAC
as
central
focus
   Part
I,
Chapter
II
   Around
650
Public
Authorities
   Largest
contingent
is
Police
&
Intelligence
 ▪  80
Forces,
Law
Enforcement
&
Intelligence
Agencies
 ▪ From
Avon
&
Somerset
to
Wiltshire;
 ▪ SOCA,
CEOP,
PeCU,
SO15,
SFO,
HMRC,
RAF,
MoD
 ▪  Police
SPoCs
–
600
(500
Internet
trained)
 ▪  ABC
SPoCs
–
20

  4. 4.   Part
I,
Chapter
I
   Raw
voice
or
data
in
real‐time
   Part
I,
Chapter
II
 Have
 Want
 Amount
 Phone
Number
 Name
&
Address
 80%
 Address
 Name
&
Number
 IP
/
Email
Address
 Name,
Address
&
Number
 20%
 Name
&
Address
/
Number
 Itemised
Billing
 Name
&
Address
/
Number
 Miscellaneous
   Split
80
/
20
–
Telephony
vs
Internet

  5. 5.   Part
I,
Chapter
I
 ▪  Interests
of
National
Security
 ▪  Prevention
or
detection
of
serious
crime
 ▪  Safeguard
the
economic
wellbeing
of
the
UK

  6. 6.   Part
I,
Chapter
II
 RIPA
 Purpose
 Amount
 22(2)a
 Interests
of
National
Security
 40%
 22(2)b
 Preventing
/
Detecting
Crime
 50%
 22(2)c
 Interests
of
UK
Economy
 <1%
 22(2)d
 Interests
of
Public
Safety
 <1%
 22(2)e
 Protecting
Public
Health
 <1%
 22(2)f
 Assessing
or
Collecting
Tax
 7%
 22(2)g
 Preventing
Death
or
Injury
 2%
 22(2)h
 Order
by
Secretary
of
State
 <1%

  7. 7.   Part
I,
Chapter
I
   Warrant
signed
by
Home
Secretary,
or
designate,
 is
served
on
a
Communications
Service
Provider
 (CSP);
advance
notice
&
feasibility
check
usual.
 ▪  Can
utilise
a
standing
capability
or
require
recipient
to
 co‐operate
in
deploying
intercept
in
a
timely
fashion.
   Part
I,
Chapter
II
   A
RIPA
Notice
authorised
by
a
Designated
Person
 is
sent
by
an
Accredited
Single
Point
of
Contact
 (SPoC)
to
the
CSP;
except
for
Grade
1
(verbal).

  8. 8.   Part
I,
Chapter
II
 80%
 70%
 60%
 50%
 40%
 30%
 20%
 10%
 0%
 Grade
1
 Grade
2
 Grade
3

  9. 9.   Part
I,
Chapter
II

  10. 10.   Intelligence
use
of
RIPA

  11. 11.   Part
I,
Chapter
II

  12. 12.   Questions
welcome,
either
now
or
later.
   More
of
me:
 ▪  Blog
–
www.infosecmaven.org
 ▪  Twitter
–
www.twitter.com/INFOSEC_Maven
 ▪  LinkedIn
–
uk.linkedin.com/in/garethniblett
 ▪  If
you
want
direct
contact
details,
please
ask…


×