OECD EMPLOYER
BRAND
Playbook
1
PISA 2012
Resolución creativa de
Problemas
Las habilidades de los alumnos en
problemas de l...
2 PISA en resumen
• Más de medio millón de alumnos…
– lo que representa 28 millones de jóvenes de 15 años en 65
países/eco...
6 66 Desempeño en resolución de problemas
¿Cómo participan los alumnos de 15 años de edad
en el procesamiento cognitivo pa...
SingaporeKorea
Japan
Macao-ChinaHong Kong-China
Shanghai-ChinaChinese Taipei
Canada
AustraliaFinland
England (U.K.)Estonia...
88 Excelencia en educación
¿Cuál es la proporción de los que tienen
mejor desempeño?
99 La creciente demanda de competencias avanzadas
-20
-15
-10
-5
0
5
10
15
20
25
%
Evolución del empleo por ocupación defi...
OECD EMPLOYER
BRAND
Playbook
10
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70 Colombia
Uruguay
Montenegro
Bulgaria
UnitedArabEmirates
Malaysia
Brazil
Israel
Chile
Turkey
Hungary...
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Finland
Sweden
Norway
Canada
Estonia
Ireland
Australia
Macao-China
Spain
Denmark
UnitedStates
Engla...
1313 Fortalezas y debilidades en resolución problemas
¿Qué países tiene fortalezas particulares
en la resolución de proble...
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
200 300 400 500 600 700 800
Patrones de rendimiento relativos en la resolución
de problemas
Re...
-70
-60
-50
-40
-30
-20
-10
0
10
20
30
Bulgaria
Shanghai-China
Poland
UnitedArabEmirates
Hungary
Slovenia
Israel
Uruguay
M...
Debilidades y fortalezas en tareas estáticas e
interactivas
Fig V.3.10
Mejor rendimiento en
tareas estáticas
Mejor rendimi...
Debilidades y fortalezas en tareas de adquisición de
conocimiento y de utilización de conocimiento
Fig V.3.10
United State...
Debilidades y fortalezas en tareas de adquisición de
conocimiento
Fig V.3.10
Mejorrendimientoentaresinteractivasenrelación...
1919 Resiliencia de los estudiantes
¿Las oportunidades de aprendizaje
están equitativamente distribuidas?
2020
PISA desempeño en matemáticas por decilas
según el entorno social
300325350375400425450475500525550575600625650675
Me...
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Macao-China
Canada
HongKong-China
Japan
Norway
Korea
Estonia
Italy
Sweden
Finland
UnitedArabEmirates
En...
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
Shanghái-China
HongKong-China
Macao-China
Vietnam
Singapur
Corea
Taiwan
Japón
Liechtenste...
2323Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
Alcanzando a los de alto rendimiento
Bajo impacto sobre los resultados
Alto impacto so...
2424Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
Bajo impacto sobre los resultados
Alto impacto sobre los resultados
Baja variabilidad ...
2525Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
Bajo impacto sobre los resultados
Alto impacto sobre los resultados
Baja variabilidad ...
Estados Unidos
Polonia
Hong Kong-China
Brasil
Nueva Zelanda
Grecia
Uruguay
Reino Unido
Estonia
Finlandia
Albania
Croacia
L...
Autorresponsabilidad percibida del fracaso en
matemáticas
Porcentaje de alumnos que refieren estar “de acuerdo" o “muy de ...
2828Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
Bajo impacto sobre los resultados
Alto impacto sobre los resultados
Baja variabilidad ...
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
0
10000
20000
30000
40000
50000
60000
Japón
Noruega
Estonia
Islandia
Israel
ReinoUnido
Eslovenia
Poloni...
3030Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
Bajo impacto sobre los resultados
Alto impacto sobre los resultados
Baja variabilidad ...
3131Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
Bajo impacto sobre los resultados
Alto impacto sobre los resultados
Baja variabilidad ...
3232Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento32 Autonomía de los centros
Hong Kong-China
Brazil
Uruguay
Albania
Croatia
Latvia
Lithuania
Chinese Taipei
ThailandBulgaria
Jordan
Macao-China
UAE Arg...
Los centros escolares con más autonomía rinden mejor que
los centros escolares con menos autonomía en los sistemas
con más...
Los centros escolares con más autonomía rinden mejor que los centros
escolares con menos autonomía en los sistemas con más...
No existe una política
global de matemáticas
Existe una política
global de matemáticas455
460
465
470
475
480
485
Menor au...
0 20 40 60 80 100
Programa y metas educativas por escrito
Estandares de rendimiento de los alumnos por escrito
Recogida si...
3838Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
Bajo impacto sobre los resultados
Alto impacto sobre los resultados
Baja variabilidad ...
Hong Kong-China
Brazil
Uruguay
Croatia
Latvia
Chinese Taipei
Thailand
Bulgaria
Jordan
Macao-China
UAE
Argentina
Indonesia
...
4040Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
Bajo impacto sobre los resultados
Alto impacto sobre los resultados
Baja variabilidad ...
4141Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
Bajo impacto sobre los resultados
Alto impacto sobre los resultados
Baja variabilidad ...
4242Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
Algunos alumnos aprenden en niveles elevados Todos los alumnos deben aprender en nivel...
¡Gracias !
Consulte más detalles sobre PISA en www.pisa.oecd.org
• Todas las publicaciones nacionales e internacionales
• ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Presentación internacional Andreas Schleicher: PISA resolución problemas. Madrid 1 de abril de 2014

1,914 views

Published on

Presentación internacional Andreas Schleicher: PISA resolución problemas. Madrid 1 de abril de 2014

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,914
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
827
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
38
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Another way of looking at the evolution of demand for skills is provided by Autor, Levy and Murnane (2003), whoclassify jobs into routine and non-routine tasks. They argue that the share of non-routine analytic and interactive jobtasks (tasks that involve expert thinking and complex communication skills) performed by American workers hasincreased steadily since 1960. The share of routine cognitive and manual tasks began to decline in theearly 1970s and 1980s, respectively – coinciding with the introduction of computers and computerised productionprocesses. These are tasks that are more readily automated and put into formal algorithms. The share of non-routinemanual tasks also declined, but stabilised in the 1990s, possibly due to the fact that they cannot be easily computerisedor outsourced.
  • In the unit TRAFFIC, students are given a map of a road network with travel times indicated. While this is a unit with static items, because all the information about travel times is provided at the outset, it still exploits the advantages of computer delivery. Students can click on the map to highlight a route, with a calculator in the bottom left corner adding up travel times for the selected route. The context for the items in these units is classified as social and non-technological. In the third item, students have to use a drop-down menu to select the meeting point that satisfies a condition on travel times for all three participants in a meeting. The demand in this third item is classified as a monitoring and reflecting task, because students have to evaluate possible solutions against a given condition.This taskmeasures anelementarylevel of problemsolvingskills – Level 1 in a scalethat comprises six describedlevels in total. Across the OECD, 21% of students are only able to solvetasksatthislevel of difficulty – if any. At Level 1, students can explore a problem scenario only in a limited way, but tend to do so only when they have encountered very similar situations before. In general, students at Level 1 can solve straightforward problems provided there is only a simple condition to be satisfied and there are only one or two steps to be performed to reach the goal. Level 1 students tend not to be able to plan ahead or set subgoals.
  • Replace withbetterpicture.In the unit TICKETS, students are invited to imagine that they have just arrived at a train station that has an automated ticketing machine. The context for the items in these units is classified as social and technological. In this harder task, compared to the previous example, students must use targeted exploration to reach their goal. They are asked to find and buy the cheapest ticket that allows them to take four trips around the city on the subway, within a single day. As students, they can use concession fares. This item is classified as exploring and understanding because this is the most crucial problem-solving process involved. Indeed, to accomplish the task, students must use a targeted exploration strategy, first generating at least the two most obvious possible alternatives (a daily subway tickets with concession fares, or an individual concession fare ticket with four trips), then verifying which of these is the cheapest ticket. If students visit both screens before buying the cheapest ticket (which happens to be the individual ticket with four trips) they are given full credit. Students who buy one of the two tickets without comparing the prices for the two only earn partial credit. Solving this problem involves multiple steps.This item is an example of an interactive problem situation: students are required to engage with the unfamiliar machine and to use the machine to satisfy their needs, without having complete instructions and knowledge about the machine at the outset.Across the OECD, only about one in ninestudents (11%) are able to solveproblemsatLevel 5 on the problem-solvingscale, such as this one. At Level 5, students can systematically explore a complex problem scenario to gain an understanding of how relevant information is structured. When faced with unfamiliar, moderately complex devices, such as vending machines, they respond quickly to feedback in order to control the device. In order to reach a solution, Level 5 problem-solvers think ahead to find the best strategy that addresses all the given constraints. They can immediately adjust their plans or backtrack when they detect unexpected difficulties or when they make mistakes that take them off course.Level 5 problem-solvers, together with students reaching proficiency level 6, are considered problem solving “top performers”.
  • Because problem-solving skills are required in all kinds of occupations, and are not taught as such in school, but rather are nurtured by good instructional practices in every subject, performance in problem solving should not be strongly influenced by such gender-based stereotypes. Problem-solving performance could then be regarded as an overall indicator of gender biases in a country’s education system.The good news is that in most countries, there are no large differences in boys’ and girls’ average performance in problem solving. While boys and girls do not differ markedly in their average performance, the variation in problem-solving performance is larger among boys than among girls. At lower levels of proficiency, there are, in general, equal proportions of boys and girls. But the highest-performing students in problem solving are largely boys – with a few notable exceptions, such as Australia, Finland and Norway, where the proportion of top-performing girls is about the same as the proportion of top-performing boys. In Croatia, Italy and the Slovak Republic, on the other hand, girls are particularly rare among top-performers.Similarly, the Survey of Adults Skills shows that among adults, top-performers in problem solving are mostly men – except in Canada, Australia and Finland. Because advanced problem-solving skills are the key to access leadership positions, a lack of female leadership figures may in turn create biases in society and teachers that limit girls’ ambition to perform at the top – and perpetrate the glass ceiling.Such biases should not run in the way of nurturing each students’ creative dispositions and problem-solving skills, to enable them to live full lives and contribute with their talents and skills to the country’s well-being.
  • Studentswho, at best, are only able to solveproblemssuch as sampletask TRAFFIC.In six partner countries, more thanhalf of all students do not reach the baseline. In Korea, Japan, Macao-China and Singapore, on the other hand, lessthan one in tenstudentis.
  • Within all countries, problem-solving results vary greatly between schools: differences in problem-solving performance between schools are as large as differences in mathematics performance, indicating that schools have an important role to play in building these skills. The variation in performance between schools is a measure of how big “school effects” are. These school effects may have three distinct explanations: first, they may reflect selection mechanisms that assign students to schools; in addition, they may be the result of differences in policies and practices across schools; finally, they may be the traces of local school cultures, which develop not by design as a result of policies or deliberate practices, but by the interactions among local communities.The between-school variation in student results is therefore not a direct measure of the importance of school policies and practices for student performance in problem solving. However, if the between-school variation is compared across different student characteristics – some sensitive to education policy and practices, such as performance in mathematics, others not, such as socio-economic status – one may infer the extent to which problem-solving results are related to instructional policies and practices.One might expect the proportion of variation in performance observed between schools to be smaller in problem solving than in reading, science, and mathematics. First, the skills required in the PISA assessment of problem solving are not taught as a specific school subject in most countries, in contrast to those required in reading, science, and mathematics. Second, assessments of problem solving are not explicitly used in high-stakes examinations that influence decisions about selecting students for different classes or schools, where these exist. Yet the association ofdifferences in instruction and selection mechanisms with performance in problem solving is as strong as the association with performance in mathematics.The between-school variation, on the other hand, is much larger in student outcome measures – such as reading, mathematics, or indeed problem solving – than in student background factors that influence performance, such as the PISA index of economic, cultural, and social status (ESCS).
  • (more patternscanbeadded)Germany: same as Spain
  • TEST 1 _ L’ordre des pays est croissant (différent que dans la Figure V.2.15)
  • Interactive items are central to the PISA problem-solving assessment, and distinguish it from previous attempts at measuring problem-solving skills. They require students to be open to novelty, tolerate doubt and uncertainty, and dare to use intuitions to initiate a solution.
  • Tasks can also be distinguished by the problem-solving process that constitutes their main cognitive demand. A major distinction is between knowledge-acquisition tasks and knowledge-utilisation tasks.In knowledge-acquisition tasks, the goal is for students to develop or refine their own representation of the problem space. Students need to generate and manipulate the information in a mental representation. The movement is from concrete to abstract, from information to knowledge. The sample item TICKETS is an example. In knowledge-utilisation tasks, the goal is for students to solve a concrete problem. The movement is from abstract to concrete, from knowledge to action. Knowledge-utilisation tasks correspond to the process of “planning and executing”. To ensure that no additional generation or refinement of knowledge about the problem is needed, items targeting “planning and executing” often had the results of “representing and formulating” tasks available.The best-performing countries in problem-solving often excel particularly on knowledge-acquisition tasks that require high levels of reasoning skills and self-directed learning.
  • Together, the differences in performance according to the nature of the problem situation and the major problem-solving process targeted identify several groups of countries. These groups often overlap with historical and geographical groupings.Six East Asian countries and economies, namely Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong-China, Macao-China, Chinese Taipei and Shanghai-China, stand out for their very high success rates on knowledge-acquisition tasks, compared to their success rates on planning and executing tasks. Within this group, however, there are relatively stark differences in their performance on interactive problems. Students in Korea and Singapore are significantly more at ease with these problems than students in Shanghai-China, Chinese Taipei and Macao-China. Students from Hong Kong-China are in a middle position. While all of these countries and economies are in the top positions for overall performance, this analysis suggests that in Shanghai-China, Chinese Taipei and Macao-China, a focus on students’ skills at dealing with interactive problem situations is required in order to improve further and close the performance gap with Korea and Singapore. In reviewing their curricula, teachers and curriculum developers may want to introduce more opportunities for students to develop and exercise the traits that are linked to success on interactive items, such as curiosity, perseverance and creativity. They may find inspiration in the curricula and teaching practices of their regional neighbours. Among lower-performing countries and economies, the poor performance of several Latin American countries (Brazil, Colombia, Chile and Uruguay) appears to be mainly due to a large performance gap on knowledge-acquisition tasks. These countries have no particular difficulty with interactive tasks – and Brazil even shows a relative strength on such tasks. In these countries, efforts to raise problem-solving competency should concentrate mainly on improving students’ performance on “exploring and understanding” and on “representing and formulating” tasks. These tasks require students to build mental representations of the problem situation from the pieces of information with which they are presented. Moving from the concrete problem scenario to an abstract representation and understanding of it often demands inductive or deductive reasoning skills. Teachers and curriculum experts may question whether current curricula include sufficient opportunities to model these abstract reasoning skills and whether these opportunities are offered in the classroom.In contrast, several countries in Southern and Eastern Europe, namely Bulgaria, Montenegro, Slovenia, Croatia and Serbia, show relatively weak performance both on knowledge-acquisition tasks and on interactive tasks, compared to their performance on “planning and executing” and on static tasks. In these countries, students seem to find it particularly difficult to understand, elaborate on, and integrate information that is not explicitly given to them (in a verbal or visual format), but has to be inferred from experimental manipulation of the environment and careful observation of the effects of that manipulation. Students in these countries may benefit from greater opportunities to learn from hands-on experience.The performance gap between OECD countries in Europe and North America and the top-performing countries in problem solving mainly originates from differences in students’ performance on knowledge-acquisition tasks. In general, the PISA problem-solving assessment shows that there is significant room for improving students’ ability to turn information into useful knowledge, as measured by performance differences on the dimensions of “exploring and understanding” and “representing and formulating” problem situations.Within this group, Ireland and the United States stand out for their strong performance on interactive items, compared, for instance, to the Nordic countries (Sweden, Finland, Norway and Denmark), the Netherlands, and some countries in Central Europe (in particular, Poland, Hungary, the Slovak Republic). Therefore, the analysis also identifies a strong potential for the latter group of countries to improve on their students’ ability to cope with interactive problem situations. To do so, educators may need to foster such dispositions as being open to novelty, tolerating doubt and uncertainty, and daring to use intuition to initiate a solution.Finally, several countries, while performing at different levels, show a similar balance of skill when compared to each other, and one that is close to the OECD average pattern of performance. Italy and Australia, for instance, have a very similar pattern of performance to that observed in Japan, although in terms of overall performance, Japan ranks significantly above Australia, which, in turn, performs better than Italy. These three countries all perform close to their expected level on interactive items (based on the OECD average pattern of performance), and slightly above their expected level on knowledge-acquisition tasks (although the example of Korea and Singapore shows that significant gains are still possible for them). In other countries, such as Spain, England (United Kingdom) and Germany, performance across tasks reflects the balance observed across OECD countries, on average.
  • While large and significant, the impact of socio-economic disadvantage on problem-solving skills is weaker than it is on performance in mathematics, reading or science. At all levels of the socio-economic ladder, there is more variation in performance in problem solving than there is in mathematics, perhaps because after-school opportunities to develop problem-solving skills are more evenly distributed than opportunities to develop proficiency in mathematics or reading.
  • (Fig. II.4.5)
  • Presentación internacional Andreas Schleicher: PISA resolución problemas. Madrid 1 de abril de 2014

    1. 1. OECD EMPLOYER BRAND Playbook 1 PISA 2012 Resolución creativa de Problemas Las habilidades de los alumnos en problemas de la vida real 1 de abril de 2014 Andreas Schleicher
    2. 2. 2 PISA en resumen • Más de medio millón de alumnos… – lo que representa 28 millones de jóvenes de 15 años en 65 países/economías … realizaron una prueba de 2 horas consensuada internacionalmente … – Va más allá de evaluar si los alumnos pueden reproducir lo que se les ha enseñado … … para evaluar la capacidad de los alumnos de extrapolar de lo que saben y aplicar su conocimiento de forma creativa a situaciones novedosas – Matemáticas, lectura, ciencias, resolución de problemas, competencia financiera – Un total de 390 minutos de material de evaluación … y respondieron a preguntas sobre … – sus orígenes, sus centros escolares y su compromiso con el aprendizaje y el centro escolar • Los padres, directores y líderes de los sistemas proporcionaron datos sobre… – políticas educativas, prácticas, recursos y factores institucionales que sirven para explicar las diferencias de rendimiento. …La capacidad de participar de manera creativa en el procesamiento cognitivo para comprender y resolver situaciones problemáticas en las que la solución no es inmediatamente obvia (incluidos los aspectos motivacionales y afectivos). Problem Solving: 85 000 students in 44 countries/economies took an additional 40-min test
    3. 3. 6 66 Desempeño en resolución de problemas ¿Cómo participan los alumnos de 15 años de edad en el procesamiento cognitivo para comprender y resolver situaciones problemáticas? • Exploring and understanding the information provided with the problem. • Representing and formulating: constructing graphical, tabular, symbolic or verbal representations of the problem situation and formulating hypotheses about the relevant factors and relationships between them. • Planning and executing: devising a plan by setting goals and sub-goals, and executing the sequential steps identified in the plan. • Monitoring and reflecting: monitoring progress, reacting to feedback, and reflecting on the solution, the information provided with the problem, or the strategy adopted.
    4. 4. SingaporeKorea Japan Macao-ChinaHong Kong-China Shanghai-ChinaChinese Taipei Canada AustraliaFinland England (U.K.)Estonia France NetherlandsItalyCzech RepublicGermany United States BelgiumAustriaNorway IrelandDenmark Portugal SwedenRussian Fed. Slovak RepublicPoland SpainSlovenia Serbia Croatia Hungary TurkeyIsrael Chile Brazil Malaysia U.A.E Montenegro UruguayBulgaria Colombia 390 400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 Puntuación media Rendimiento alto en resolución de problemas Rendimiento bajo en resolución de Rendimiento medio de los alumnos de 15 años en resolución de problemas. Fig V.2.3 7
    5. 5. 88 Excelencia en educación ¿Cuál es la proporción de los que tienen mejor desempeño?
    6. 6. 99 La creciente demanda de competencias avanzadas -20 -15 -10 -5 0 5 10 15 20 25 % Evolución del empleo por ocupación definida a través de las habilidades en resolución de problemas Employment of workers with advanced problem-solving skills Employment of workers with poor problem-solving skillsEmployment of workers with medium-low problem-solving skills (PIAAC) Source:PIAAC 2011
    7. 7. OECD EMPLOYER BRAND Playbook 10
    8. 8. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Colombia Uruguay Montenegro Bulgaria UnitedArabEmirates Malaysia Brazil Israel Chile Turkey Hungary Croatia Serbia Slovenia Spain SlovakRepublic Poland Sweden RussianFederation OECDaverage Norway Belgium Portugal Denmark Ireland Germany Netherlands Austria CzechRepublic UnitedStates France Italy England(U.K.) Australia Estonia Canada Finland ChineseTaipei Shanghai-China HongKong-China Singapore Macao-China Japan Korea % De media en la OCDE, el 21% de los alumnos no alcanzan el nivel mínimo en la competencia de resolución de problemas – lo que significa que no son capaces de planificar con antelación ni pueden resolver una tarea simple como el ejemplo TRÁFICO. Porcentaje de alumnos en el nivel más bajo de desempeño en resolución de problemas Tab V.2.1 11
    9. 9. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Finland Sweden Norway Canada Estonia Ireland Australia Macao-China Spain Denmark UnitedStates England(U.K.) Portugal Korea Singapore Japan Poland HongKong-China RussianFederation Colombia Serbia Malaysia OECDaverage Montenegro ChineseTaipei Croatia Shanghai-China Uruguay Chile Italy Brazil Austria Belgium CzechRepublic UnitedArabEmirates SlovakRepublic Israel Turkey Slovenia Germany Bulgaria Netherlands Hungary Problem solving Mathematics PISA index of economic, social and cultural status (ESCS) Proporcióndelavariaciónentrecentros comoporcentajedeltotal(variaciónintracentrosyentrecentros) Diferencias entre centros en resolución de problemas, matemáticas y estatus socio-económico Fig V.2.12 12
    10. 10. 1313 Fortalezas y debilidades en resolución problemas ¿Qué países tiene fortalezas particulares en la resolución de problemas?
    11. 11. 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 Patrones de rendimiento relativos en la resolución de problemas Rendimiento en matemáticas Fig V.2.16 Fig V.2.17 Relación media entre el rendimiento en resolución de problemas y matemáticas Estados Unidos e Inglaterra (RU) obtienen mejores resultados de los esperados en resolución de problemas. La diferencia entre el rendimiento observado y el esperado es mayor entre los que tienen mejores resultados en matemáticas Japón obtiene mejores resultados de los esperados en resolución de problemas. La diferencia entre el rendimiento observado y el esperado es mayor entre los que tienen peores resultados en matemáticas El rendimiento de Polonia es más bajo de lo esperado en resolución de problemas. La diferencia entre el rendimiento observado y el esperado es similar en todos los niveles de rendimiento en matemáticas. 14 El rendimiento de España es más bajo de lo esperado en resolución de problemas. La diferencia entre el rendimiento observado y el esperado es mayor entre los que obtienen peor rendimiento en matemáticas. El rendimiento de Singapur en resolución de problemas es tan alto como se esperaba en todos los niveles de rendimiento de matemáticas Rendimiento en resolución de problemas
    12. 12. -70 -60 -50 -40 -30 -20 -10 0 10 20 30 Bulgaria Shanghai-China Poland UnitedArabEmirates Hungary Slovenia Israel Uruguay Montenegro Croatia Spain Ireland HongKong-China Netherlands Estonia Turkey Malaysia Germany Denmark Belgium ChineseTaipei Finland OECDaverage Colombia Austria SlovakRepublic RussianFederation Portugal Sweden Canada CzechRepublic Chile Norway Singapore France Australia Brazil Macao-China England(U.K.) Italy UnitedStates Serbia Japan Korea % Rendimiento relativo en resolución de problemas Fig V.2.15 El rendimiento de los alumnos en resolución de problemas es menor que el rendimiento esperado El rendimiento de los alumnos en resolución de problemas es mayor que el rendimiento esperado 15
    13. 13. Debilidades y fortalezas en tareas estáticas e interactivas Fig V.3.10 Mejor rendimiento en tareas estáticas Mejor rendimiento en tareas interactivas 16 United States Germany Austria France Japan Sweden Australia Israel Canada Ireland Belgium Norway Korea Italy Hong Kong-China Chinese Taipei Macao-China Singapore Shanghai-China Poland England Estonia Finland Slovak Rep. Czech Rep. Turkey Hungary Chile Netherlands Spain Denmark Slovenia Portugal Brazil Uruguay Croatia Bulgaria U.A.E. Montenegro Colombia Malaysia Serbia Russian Fed.
    14. 14. Debilidades y fortalezas en tareas de adquisición de conocimiento y de utilización de conocimiento Fig V.3.10 United States England Germany Czech Rep. France Japan Australia Canada Ireland Chile Belgium Spain Portugal Korea Italy Brazil U.A.E. SingaporeColombia Poland Estonia Finland Slovak Rep. AustriaTurkey SwedenHungary Israel NetherlandsDenmark Slovenia Norway Hong Kong-ChinaUruguay Croatia Chinese Taipei Bulgaria Macao-China Montenegro Malaysia Serbia Russian Fed. Shanghai-China Mejor rendimiento en tareas de utilización del conocimiento Mejor rendimiento en tareas de adquisición del conocimiento 17
    15. 15. Debilidades y fortalezas en tareas de adquisición de conocimiento Fig V.3.10 Mejorrendimientoentaresinteractivasenrelacióncontareasestáticas Mejor rendimiento en tareas de adquisición de conocimiento en relación a tareas de utilización del conocimiento United States Poland England Estonia Finland Slovak Rep. Germany Austria Czech Rep. France Japan Turkey Sweden Hungary Australia Israel Canada Ireland Chile Belgium Netherlands Spain Denmark Slovenia Portugal Norway Korea Italy Hong Kong-China Brazil Uruguay Croatia Chinese Taipei Bulgaria Macao-China U.A.E. Montenegro Singapore Colombia Malaysia Serbia Russian Fed. Shanghai-China OECD average OECDaverage Mejor rendimiento en tareas interactivas Mejor rendimiento en tareas estáticas Mejor rendimiento en tareas de adquisición del conocimiento Mejor rendimiento en tareas de utilización del conocimiento Rendimiento mejor del esperado en tareas interactivas, rendimiento más bajo del esperado en tareas de adquisición del conocimiento Rendimiento mejor del esperado en tareas interactivas y de adquisicion del conocimiento Rendimiento más bajo del esperado en tareas interactivas y de adquisición del conocimiento Rendimiento más bajo del esperado en tareas interactivas, rendimiento más alto del esperado en tareas de adquisición del conocimiento 18
    16. 16. 1919 Resiliencia de los estudiantes ¿Las oportunidades de aprendizaje están equitativamente distribuidas?
    17. 17. 2020 PISA desempeño en matemáticas por decilas según el entorno social 300325350375400425450475500525550575600625650675 Mexico Chile Greece Norway Sweden Iceland Israel Italy UnitedStates Spain Denmark Luxembourg Australia Ireland UnitedKingdom Hungary Canada Finland Austria Turkey Liechtenstein CzechRepublic Estonia Portugal Slovenia SlovakRepublic NewZealand Germany Netherlands France Switzerland Poland Belgium Japan Macao-China HongKong-China Korea Singapore ChineseTaipei Shanghai-China Source: PISA 2012
    18. 18. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Macao-China Canada HongKong-China Japan Norway Korea Estonia Italy Sweden Finland UnitedArabEmirates England(United… Spain Denmark Australia Croatia Netherlands ChineseTaipei Montenegro UnitedStates Ireland OECDaverage Austria Singapore Poland RussianFederation Slovenia Colombia France Germany Serbia Israel Belgium Shanghai-China Brazil CzechRepublic Malaysia Turkey Chile Portugal Uruguay Bulgaria Hungary SlovakRepublic Problem solving Mathematics Porcentajedevariaciónenelrendimiento explicadoporelestatussocio-económico Relación entre el estatus socio-económico y el rendimiento en resolución de problemas y matemáticas Fig V.4.9a 21
    19. 19. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Shanghái-China HongKong-China Macao-China Vietnam Singapur Corea Taiwan Japón Liechtenstein Suiza Estonia PaísesBajos Polonia Canadá Finlandia Bélgica Portugal Alemania Turquía mediaOCDE Italia España Letonia Irlanda Australia Tailandia Austria Luxemburgo RepúblicaCheca Eslovenia ReinoUnido Lituania Francia Noruega Islandia NuevaZelanda Fed.Rusa EstadosUnidos Croacia Dinamarca Suecia Hungría RepúblicaEslovaca México Serbia Grecia Israel Túnez Rumanía Malasia Indonesia Bulgaria Kazajistán Uruguay Brasil CostaRica Chile Colombia Montenegro EmiratosÁrabesUnidos Argentina Jordania Perú Qatar % Porcentaje de alumnos resilientes Más del 10% resilientes Entre el 5%-10% de alumnos resilientes Menos del 5% Fig II.2.4 22 Los alumnos desfavorecidos socioeconómicamente no solo puntúan menos en matemáticas, también registran niveles inferiores de compromiso, iniciativa, motivación y autoconfianza. Los alumnos resilientes rompen esta relación y comparten muchas de las características de los alumnos de alto rendimiento aventajados. Un alumno resiliente se encuentra en el cuartil inferior del índice PISA de posición económica, social y cultural (ESCS) en el país de evaluación y rinde en el cuartil superior de alumnos de todos los países, después de considerar la posición socioeconómica.
    20. 20. 2323Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento Alcanzando a los de alto rendimiento Bajo impacto sobre los resultados Alto impacto sobre los resultados Baja variabilidad Alta variabilidad Trampas económicas Obligatorio Beneficios accesibles Beneficios rápidos Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
    21. 21. 2424Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento Bajo impacto sobre los resultados Alto impacto sobre los resultados Baja variabilidad Alta variabilidad Trampas económicas Obligatorio Beneficios accesibles Beneficios rápidos Compromiso con el logro universal Accesos, sistemas de instrucción Capacidad en el punto de entrega Estructuras de incentivos y de rendición de cuentas Recursos allí donde aportan más Un sistema de aprendizaje Coherencia Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
    22. 22. 2525Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento Bajo impacto sobre los resultados Alto impacto sobre los resultados Baja variabilidad Alta variabilidad Trampas económicas Obligatorio Beneficios accesibles Beneficios rápidos Compromiso con el logro universal Accesos, sistemas de instrucción Capacidad en el punto de entrega Estructuras de incentivos y de rendición de cuentas Recursos Recursos allí donde aportan más Un sistema de aprendizaje Coherencia  Un compromiso con la educación y la creencia de que las competencias pueden aprenderse y por tanto todos los niños pueden lograrlo  Estándares educativos universales y personalización como forma de abordar la heterogeneidad del alumnado … … frente a la creencia de que los alumnos tienen distintos destinos con distintas expectativas, y abordar la heterogeneidad con selección/estratificación  Clara articulación de quién es responsable de garantizar el éxito del alumno y ante quién Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento
    23. 23. Estados Unidos Polonia Hong Kong-China Brasil Nueva Zelanda Grecia Uruguay Reino Unido Estonia Finlandia Albania Croacia Letonia República Eslovaca Luxemburgo Alemania Lituania Austria República Checa Taiwan Francia Tailandia Japón Turquía Suecia Hungría Australia Israel Canadá IrlandaBulgaria Jordania Chile Macao-China EAU Bélgica Países Bajos España Argentina Indonesia Dinamarca Kazajistán Perú Costa Rica Suiza Montenegro Túnez Islandia Eslovenia Qatar Singapur Portugal Noruega Colombia Malasia México Liechtenstein Corea Serbia Federación Rusa Rumanía Vietnam Italia Shanghái-China R² = 0.36 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 -0.60 -0.40 -0.20 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 Rendimientomedioenmatemáticas Índice medio de autoeficacia en matemáticas MediaOCDE Los países en los que los alumnos creen más en sus habilidades rinden mejor en matemáticas26 Fig III.4.5
    24. 24. Autorresponsabilidad percibida del fracaso en matemáticas Porcentaje de alumnos que refieren estar “de acuerdo" o “muy de acuerdo" con lo siguiente: 0 20 40 60 80 100 No se me da bien resolver problemas matemáticas Esta semana el profesor no explicó bien los conceptos Esta semana no elegí bien las respuestas del examen A veces la materia es demasiado difícil El profesor no supo captar el interés de los alumnos A veces no tengo suerte España Shanghái-China Media OCDE Fig III.3.6 27 B
    25. 25. 2828Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento Bajo impacto sobre los resultados Alto impacto sobre los resultados Baja variabilidad Alta variabilidad Trampas económicas Obligatorio Beneficios accesibles Beneficios rápidos Compromiso con el logro universal Accesos, sistemas de instrucción Capacidad en el punto de entrega Estructuras de incentivos y de rendición de cuentas Recursos Recursos allí donde aportan más Un sistema de aprendizaje Coherencia  Metas claras y ambiciosas compartidas por todo el sistema y alineadas con accesos selectivos y sistemas de instrucción  Cadena de entrega bien establecida a través de la cual las metas curriculares se traducen en sistemas de instrucción, prácticas de instrucción y aprendizaje del alumno (intencionado, implantado y alcanzado)  Alto nivel de contenido metacognitivo de la instrucción …
    26. 26. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 Japón Noruega Estonia Islandia Israel ReinoUnido Eslovenia Polonia República… Corea Suecia Finlandia Dinamarca NuevaZelanda República… Australia Canadá Irlanda EstadosUnidos Austria Italia Portugal Alemania España Francia PaísesBajos Bélgica % $US,PPPs Coste total por repetidor (un curso) Coste total anual, comparado con gasto total en educación primaria y secundaria (%) La repetición de curso es una política cara Fig IV.1.5
    27. 27. 3030Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento Bajo impacto sobre los resultados Alto impacto sobre los resultados Baja variabilidad Alta variabilidad Trampas económicas Obligatorio Beneficios accesibles Beneficios rápidos Compromiso con el logro universal Accesos, sistemas de instrucción Capacidad en el punto de entrega Estructuras de incentivos y de rendición de cuentas Recursos Recursos allí donde aportan más Un sistema de aprendizaje Coherencia  Capacidad en el punto de entrega  Atraer, desarrollar y retener a profesores y líderes escolares de alta calidad y una organización de trabajo en la que puedan utilizar su potencial  Liderazgo en la instrucción y gestión de recursos humanos en los centros escolares  Mantener la enseñanza como una profesión atractiva  Desarrollo profesional en todo el sistema …
    28. 28. 3131Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento Bajo impacto sobre los resultados Alto impacto sobre los resultados Baja variabilidad Alta variabilidad Trampas económicas Obligatorio Beneficios accesibles Beneficios rápidos Compromiso con el logro universal Accesos, sistemas de instrucción Capacidad en el punto de entrega Estructuras de incentivos y de rendición de cuentas Recursos Recursos allí donde aportan más Un sistema de aprendizaje Coherencia  Incentivos, rendición de cuentas, gestión del conocimiento  Estructuras de incentivos alineadas Para los alumnos  Cómo las vías de acceso afectan a la fortaleza, dirección, claridad y naturaleza de los incentivos para los alumnos en cada etapa de su educación  Grado al cual los alumnos tienen incentivos para realizar cursos difíciles y estudiar mucho  Costes de oportunidad de permanecer en la escuela y rendir bien Para los profesores  Realizar innovaciones pedagógicas y/u organizativas  Mejorar su propio rendimiento y el rendimiento de sus colegas  rAprovechar oportunidades de desarrollo profesional que conducen a unas prácticas pedagógicas más robustas  Equilibrio entre rendición de cuentas vertical y lateral  Instrumentos efectivos para gestionar y compartir los conocimientos y difundir la innovación – comunicación dentro del sistema y con los partícipes que lo rodean  Un centro capaz con autoridad y legitimidad para actuar
    29. 29. 3232Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento32 Autonomía de los centros
    30. 30. Hong Kong-China Brazil Uruguay Albania Croatia Latvia Lithuania Chinese Taipei ThailandBulgaria Jordan Macao-China UAE Argentina Indonesia Kazakhstan Peru Costa Rica Tunisia Qatar Singapore Colombia Malaysia Serbia Romania Viet Nam Shanghai-China USA Poland New Zealand Greece UK Estonia Finland Slovak Rep. Luxembourg Germany Austria Czech Rep. France Japan Turkey Sweden Hungary Australia Israel Canada Chile Belgium Netherlands Spain Denmark Switzerland Iceland Slovenia Portugal Norway Korea Italy R² = 0.13 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 Rendimientoenmatemáticas(puntos) Índice de responsabilidad de los centros escolares del currículo y las evaluaciones (puntos del índice) Los países que otorgan a los centros escolares autonomía sobre sus currículos y evaluaciones tienden a rendir mejor en matemáticas Fig IV.1.15
    31. 31. Los centros escolares con más autonomía rinden mejor que los centros escolares con menos autonomía en los sistemas con más colaboración Los profesores no participan en la gestión Los profesores participan en la gestión455 460 465 470 475 480 485 Menor autonomía del centro Mayor autonomía del centro puntos La autonomía del centro escolar para la adjudicación de recursos por el nivel del sistema de participación del profesorado en la gestión del centro en todos los países y economías participantes Fig IV.1.17
    32. 32. Los centros escolares con más autonomía rinden mejor que los centros escolares con menos autonomía en los sistemas con más planes de rendición de cuentas Los datos del centro no son públicos Los datos del centro son públicos464 466 468 470 472 474 476 478 Menor autonomía del centro Mayor autonomía del centro puntos Autonomía del centro escolar en el currículo y evaluaciones por nivel del sistema de mostrar datos de logros públicamente Fig IV.1.16
    33. 33. No existe una política global de matemáticas Existe una política global de matemáticas455 460 465 470 475 480 485 Menor autonomía del centro Mayor autonomía del centro Los centros escolares con más autonomía rinden mejor que los centros escolares con menos autonomía en los sistemas con políticas de matemáticas estandarizadas puntos Autonomía del centro escolar en el currículo y evaluaciones por grado de implantación del sistema de una política global de matemáticas (p.ej. currículo y materiales docentes) Fig IV.1.16
    34. 34. 0 20 40 60 80 100 Programa y metas educativas por escrito Estandares de rendimiento de los alumnos por escrito Recogida sistemática de datos: asistencia de profesores y alumnos, tasas de finalización, resultados de exámenes y desarrollo profesional de profesores Evaluación interna / auto-evaluación Evaluación externa Opinión por escrito de los alumnos (sobre clases, profesores o recursos) Profesores dan apoyo como mentores Consultas periódicas con expertos durante un periodo de por lo menos seis meses para mejorar el centro Implementar una política global para las matemáticas % Porcentaje de alumnos en centros escolares cuyo director refiere que su centro cuenta con lo siguiente para la garantía de calidad y mejora: Spain Singapur Media OCDE Garantía de calidad y mejora del centro escolar Fig IV.4.14 37
    35. 35. 3838Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento Bajo impacto sobre los resultados Alto impacto sobre los resultados Baja variabilidad Alta variabilidad Trampas económicas Obligatorio Beneficios accesibles Beneficios rápidos Compromiso con el logro universal Accesos, sistemas de instrucción Capacidad en el punto de entrega Estructuras de incentivos y de rendición de cuentas Recursos Recursos allí donde aportan más Un sistema de aprendizaje Coherencia  Invertir recursos donde tengan mayor impacto  Alinear los recursos con los retos clave (p.ej. atraer a los profesores de mayor talento a las clases más difíciles)  Decisiones efectivas de gasto que prioricen a los profesores de alta calidad por encima de clases más pequeñas
    36. 36. Hong Kong-China Brazil Uruguay Croatia Latvia Chinese Taipei Thailand Bulgaria Jordan Macao-China UAE Argentina Indonesia Kazakhstan Peru Costa Rica Montenegro Tunisia Qatar Singapore Colombia Malaysia Serbia Romania Viet Nam Shanghai-China USA Poland New Zealand Greece UK Estonia Finland Slovak Rep. Luxembourg Germany AustriaFrance Japan Turkey Sweden Hungary Australia Israel Canada Ireland Chile Belgium SpainDenmark Switzerland Iceland Slovenia Portugal Norway Mexico Korea Italy R² = 0.19 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 -0.500.511.5 Rendimientoenmatemáticas(puntos) Equidad en la adjudicación de recursos (puntos del índice) Los países con un mejor rendimiento en matemáticas tienden a adjudicar los recursos educativos más equitativamente Mayor equidadMenor equidad Ajustado por PIB per cápita Fig IV.1.11 SHA
    37. 37. 4040Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento Bajo impacto sobre los resultados Alto impacto sobre los resultados Baja variabilidad Alta variabilidad Trampas económicas Obligatorio Beneficios accesibles Beneficios rápidos Compromiso con el logro universal Accesos, sistemas de instrucción Capacidad en el punto de entrega Estructuras de incentivos y de rendición de cuentas Recursos Recursos allí donde aportan más Un sistema de aprendizaje Coherencia  Coherencia de las políticas y las prácticas  Alineación de las políticas en todos los aspectos del sistema  Coherencia de las políticas durante periodos de tiempo prolongados  Consistencia en la implantación  Fidelidad de la implantación (sin control excesivo) CAN
    38. 38. 4141Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento Bajo impacto sobre los resultados Alto impacto sobre los resultados Baja variabilidad Alta variabilidad Trampas económicas Obligatorio Beneficios accesibles Beneficios rápidos Compromiso con el logro universal Accesos, sistemas de instrucción Capacidad en el punto de entrega Estructuras de incentivos y de rendición de cuentas Recursos allí donde aportan más Un sistema de aprendizaje Coherencia
    39. 39. 4242Leccionesdelosdealtorendimiento Algunos alumnos aprenden en niveles elevados Todos los alumnos deben aprender en niveles elevados Inclusión de los alumnos Competencias cognitivas rutinarias, aprendizaje de memoria Aprender a aprender, maneras complejas de pensar y de trabajar Currículo, instrucción y evaluación Pocos años más que secundaria Trabajadores de alto nivel de conocimiento profesional Calidad del profesorado ‘Taylorístico’, jerárquico Horizontal, entre colegas Organización de trabajo Principalmente hacia las autoridades Principalmente hacia los pares y partícipes Rendición de cuentas Lo que significa todo esto Antiguo sistema burocrático Moderno sistema de capacitación
    40. 40. ¡Gracias ! Consulte más detalles sobre PISA en www.pisa.oecd.org • Todas las publicaciones nacionales e internacionales • La base de datos completa de micro-nivel Email: Andreas.Schleicher@OECD.org Twitter: SchleicherEDU y recuerde: sin datos, se es solo otra persona más con una opinión

    ×