The importance of a lifeguard response to water related natural disasters

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Bob Albers and Sergeant Darrell (USA)

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The importance of a lifeguard response to water related natural disasters

  1. 1. U.S.A.R. TASK FORCE 8 SAN DIEGO SWIFTWATER RESCUE TEAM OPERATION: HURRICANE KATRINA Aug. 29 – Sept. 16, 2005
  2. 2. DEPLOYMENT <ul><li>Sunday morning, August 28, 2005 – Hurricane Katrina, category 3 landfalls on Gulf Coast New Orleans. </li></ul><ul><li>By Sunday night levees broken in numerous places flooding the city and outlying communities. </li></ul><ul><li>Monday afternoon California USAR task forces 1-8 are on standby. </li></ul><ul><li>3 Firefighters and 11 Lifeguard swift water rescue specialists are preparing gear at NTC USAR cache. </li></ul><ul><li>2300 hours California teams are activated. </li></ul><ul><li>0200 hours Tuesday, San Diego Task Force 8 deploys to March AFB in Riverside </li></ul>
  3. 3. March AFB <ul><li>Sleep on your feet. On the tarmac for 18 hours waiting for a transport. </li></ul>
  4. 4. LAFAYETTE LOUISIANA <ul><li>California Task Force 8 lands in Lafayette, two hours from New Orleans. </li></ul><ul><li>Receive orders to proceed to Metarrie, FEMA HQ </li></ul>
  5. 5. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS <ul><li>All California Task forces meet in Metarrie at the New Orleans Saints’ training camp. AKA FEMA HQ, and USAR BASE OF OPERATIONS. </li></ul>
  6. 6. NO REST <ul><li>Within one hour of reaching camp, task forces deploy to downtown New Orleans to start rescue operations. </li></ul>
  7. 7. STAND DOWN <ul><li>Thursday, our first full day in Louisiana. No rescue operations due to shots fired near the camp. </li></ul><ul><li>Used the down time to ready gear. </li></ul>
  8. 8. DOWNTOWN NEW ORLEANS <ul><li>Each day we received orders to deploy to different flood zones and commence search and rescue operations. Usually we traveled through downtown. </li></ul>
  9. 9. SUPERDOME <ul><li>The mayhem had not yet started in the superdome. </li></ul>
  10. 10. SCENES OF DESTRUCTION <ul><li>En route to our search areas we got a good view of the situation. </li></ul>
  11. 11. SCENES OF DESTRUCTION <ul><li>There was not a single house in the greater New Orleans area that was not affected in some way by the storm. </li></ul>
  12. 12. FIRES <ul><li>Fire Departments were too busy making rescues and evacs. to extinguish fires. </li></ul><ul><li>Chemical plant fire. </li></ul>
  13. 13. AIRLIFT <ul><li>Army, Navy, Marines, Coast Guard. All were busy making rescues and delivering MRE’s and water to residents. </li></ul>
  14. 14. AIR OPS <ul><li>A few days we were air lifted to remote or impassable areas to search and rescue. </li></ul>
  15. 15. AIR OPS <ul><li>We loaded our boats, our gear, our people into Chinooks or Blackhawks and went for a ride. </li></ul>
  16. 16. AIR OPS <ul><li>Once inserted, we were on our own. </li></ul><ul><li>This day we worked with a foot patrol from Tennessee and Firefighters from Sacramento. Our LZ was a cemetary next to a battlefield of the War of 1812. </li></ul>
  17. 17. SAR TACTICS <ul><li>Our team sometimes worked with other teams from California and other states. </li></ul><ul><li>Each morning we were deployed with maps and targets. From there we formulated a game plan. </li></ul>
  18. 18. RESCUES <ul><li>The first few days were rescue ops and relocation of the stranded. </li></ul>
  19. 19. RESCUES (cont’d) <ul><li>Animals were a lower priority, but we did what we could, when we could. </li></ul>
  20. 20. FOOT PATROLS <ul><li>As the rescue operations dwindled, we worked more foot patrols throughout the city and suburbs, searching and tagging houses and businesses. </li></ul>
  21. 21. MORE FLOOD SCENES
  22. 22. Cont’d
  23. 23. Cont’d
  24. 24. Cont’d
  25. 25. Cont’d
  26. 26. Cont’d
  27. 27. Demobilize <ul><li>After fourteen days straight of work, we were demobilized and sent home. </li></ul><ul><li>SEE YOU NEXT TIME! </li></ul>

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