Where do Different Feed Options Fit - Biophysical niches in Ethiopia

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Diriba Geleta (EIAR)

FAP Symposium on Feed in Smallholder Systems, Luang Prabang, Laos, 18-19 November 2010

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Where do Different Feed Options Fit - Biophysical niches in Ethiopia

  1. 1. Where do Different Feed Options Fit - Biophysical niches in Ethiopia <br />DiribaGeleta (EIAR)<br />FAP Symposium on Feed in Smallholder Systems ,<br />LuangPrabang, Laos, 18-19 November 2010<br />
  2. 2. 1. What is the key issue?<br /><ul><li>Ethiopia’s Livestock: largest population but low level of productivity.
  3. 3. Feed shortage and poor quality of available feeds is the major constraints. </li></ul> <br /> <br />
  4. 4. 2. What has been done?<br /><ul><li>Conventional strategies for tackling feed shortage revolve around evaluation of a range of forage crops and distribute them through public extension services
  5. 5. The species found to be adaptable to different ecological/biophysical niches are given below. </li></li></ul><li>Species for high altitude<br />Avenasativa (Sole pasture, mixed pasture with oat, <br />as precursor to highland pulses grown on vertisols)<br />Viciaspp, (mixed pasture in association with oats)<br />Tagasaste (backyard fodder as protein <br /> supplement) <br />Beta vulgaris (backyard fodder as dry season <br /> supplement)<br />
  6. 6. Species for mediumaltitude<br />Chlorisgayana (sole pasture, mixed pasture with <br />stylosanthes guianensis and Siratro) <br />Pennisetumpurpureum (backyard fodder for cut <br />and carry, forage strips as fodder and erosion <br />control , on irrigation canals for cut and carry <br />fodder) <br />Desmodium species (undersowing in maize, <br />backyard as protein supplement, in mixed stand <br />with Rhodes and Panicum) <br />Stylosanthes guianensis (undersowing in maize, <br />fodder bank as source of protein)<br />
  7. 7. Species for Medium…<br />Macroptiliumtropurpureum (as component <br />in Rhodes pasture) <br />Sesbaniasesban (backyard fodder as protein <br />source, integrated with coffee plants)<br />Leucaenaspp (backyard fodder as protein <br />source, alley cropped with sorghum or maize) <br />
  8. 8. Species for low altitude<br />Panicumantidotale (best under irrigated condition)<br />Lablab purpureus (intercropped with sorghum and <br />maize) <br />Cow pea (as food-feed crop, intercropped with maize <br />or sorghum)<br />Stylosanthes guianensis (over sown in natural pasture)<br />Leucaenaspp (backyard fodder as protein source, alley <br />cropped in sorghum or maize fields )<br />
  9. 9. 3. Some gaps <br /><ul><li>Poor research-extension farmer linkage
  10. 10. Mismatch between species and appropriate niches
  11. 11. Lack of quality forage seeds
  12. 12. Low attention to forage crops development compared to other subsectors </li></li></ul><li>6. Work to be done<br /><ul><li>Strengthening the linkage between research, extension and other stakeholders involved in forage development
  13. 13. Selecting appropriate species for a particular </li></ul> environment or biophysical niches<br /><ul><li>Improving supply of quality forage seed
  14. 14. Forage development efforts should be harnessed with improvement of livestock commodities</li>

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