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Value chain actors‘ practices associated with
the spread of African swine fever disease in
smallholder pig systems in Ugan...
Background: the pig sector
 Pig production is a
dynamic and rapidly
growing sector in Uganda
 Uganda has the highest
per...
Background: the pig sector
 Pigs are “living banks”
 More than 1.1 million households
rear pigs
 Informal sector mainly...
Background: African swine fever
 African swine fever
(ASF) is the major pig
health constraint in
Uganda (up to 100%
morta...
Objectives of the study
 Describe current value chain practices that
exacerbate the risk for ASF;
 Assess value chain ac...
Methodology
Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA)
with 145 value chain actors and
36 stakeholders using
participatory resear...
The Uganda pig value chain map
Results: risky practices
Scavenging
and tethering
are common
Trade and
movement of
sick pigs without
movement
permits
Prod...
Results: risky practices
Backyard
slaughtering with
improper disposal
of slaughter waste
Poor hygiene at
butchery and lack...
Results: risky practices
Lack of application
biosecurity measures (ex.
absence of disinfection of
work equipment)
Poor fee...
Results: ranking of value chain nodes
Ranking of the value chain nodes according to the level
of risk they represent in re...
Conclusion
 Application of biosecurity is low along the value chain;
 Actors are aware of the ASF disease and its
conseq...
Implications
Results were used to:
 design gender-sensitive interventions for building
value chain actors’ capacities on ...
This work is financed by
The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)
It is implemented in a partnership wit...
This presentation is licensed for use under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence.
better lives throu...
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Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 1 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 2 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 3 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 4 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 5 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 6 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 7 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 8 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 9 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 10 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 11 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 12 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 13 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 14 Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Slide 15
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Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda

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Paper presented by Michel Dione, Emily Ouma, Felix Opio, Peter Lule, Brian Kawuma and Danilo Pezo (ILRI) at the Joint International Conference of the Association of Institutions for Tropical Veterinary Medicine and the Society of Tropical Veterinary Medicine, Berlin, 4–8 September 2016

Value chain actors’ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda

  1. 1. Value chain actors‘ practices associated with the spread of African swine fever disease in smallholder pig systems in Uganda Michel Dione, Emily Ouma, Felix Opio, Peter Lule, Brian Kawuma and Danilo Pezo AITVM/STVM Conference, Berlin, 4-8 September 2016
  2. 2. Background: the pig sector  Pig production is a dynamic and rapidly growing sector in Uganda  Uganda has the highest per capita consumption of pork in East Africa (3.4kg/person/year)
  3. 3. Background: the pig sector  Pigs are “living banks”  More than 1.1 million households rear pigs  Informal sector mainly managed by women and children
  4. 4. Background: African swine fever  African swine fever (ASF) is the major pig health constraint in Uganda (up to 100% mortality)  ASF in endemic in Uganda
  5. 5. Objectives of the study  Describe current value chain practices that exacerbate the risk for ASF;  Assess value chain actors’ perception of the risk associated with the spread of ASF;  Suggest recommendations for sustainable ASF control measures.
  6. 6. Methodology Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) with 145 value chain actors and 36 stakeholders using participatory research tools in two districts.
  7. 7. The Uganda pig value chain map
  8. 8. Results: risky practices Scavenging and tethering are common Trade and movement of sick pigs without movement permits Producer Trader
  9. 9. Results: risky practices Backyard slaughtering with improper disposal of slaughter waste Poor hygiene at butchery and lack of veterinary inspection of meat Poor handling of pork and disposal of food waste Butcher Pork retailer Pork joint
  10. 10. Results: risky practices Lack of application biosecurity measures (ex. absence of disinfection of work equipment) Poor feeds and feeding strategies (ex. use of contaminated feeds) Vets/drug stockist Feed stockist
  11. 11. Results: ranking of value chain nodes Ranking of the value chain nodes according to the level of risk they represent in relation to the spread of ASF (1=highest level of risk and 6=lowest level of risk) Value chain nodes Location Ranking Pig trading Market 1 Slaughtering Backyard slaughter 2 Retailing Butchery 3 Pig Production Farm 4 Input supply and services Shop/farm 5 Consumption Pork joint 6
  12. 12. Conclusion  Application of biosecurity is low along the value chain;  Actors are aware of the ASF disease and its consequences to the value chain, but they lack knowledge and capacities to control it;  Value chain actors lack incentives for adopting biosecurity measures;  There is poor enforcement of disease control policies and regulations along the value chain.
  13. 13. Implications Results were used to:  design gender-sensitive interventions for building value chain actors’ capacities on best practices in pig husbandry and application of biosecurity measures in Uganda;  advocate enforcement of policies and regulations related to the control ASF through the Uganda Pig Multi-stakeholder Platform.
  14. 14. This work is financed by The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) It is implemented in a partnership with Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries (MAAIF) It contributes to the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish We thank all donors that globally support our work through their contributions to the CGIAR system Acknowledgements
  15. 15. This presentation is licensed for use under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence. better lives through livestock ilri.org
  • LarraRomabon

    Jun. 4, 2019

Paper presented by Michel Dione, Emily Ouma, Felix Opio, Peter Lule, Brian Kawuma and Danilo Pezo (ILRI) at the Joint International Conference of the Association of Institutions for Tropical Veterinary Medicine and the Society of Tropical Veterinary Medicine, Berlin, 4–8 September 2016

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