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Understanding public-private partnerships

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Presented by Solomon Gizaw at the HEARD project regional public-private partnerships task force workshop, Amhara, 18 November 2019: Somali, 21 November 2019: Oromia, 26 November 2019

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Understanding public-private partnerships

  1. 1. Understanding public-private partnerships (PPPs) Solomon Gizaw (ILRI-HEARD) Regional PPPs task force workshop Amhara, 18 November 2019: Somali, 21 November 2019: Oromia, 26 November 2019
  2. 2. Public-private partnerships (PPPs)
  3. 3. Process
  4. 4. PPPs • Transactional: • Government procurement of a specific AH/sanitary service from private vet service providers, initiated and funded by public sector • Collaborative: • Joint commitment between public sector and end-beneficiaries (p.e. producer association) to delivery mutually agreed policies/outcomes • Transformative: • Establishment of a sustainable capability to deliver otherwise unattainable major programmes, often initiated by private sector
  5. 5. Steps for setting up PPPs (OIE steps) - Group work Which gaps can be addressed through a PPP • Review the vet service gaps and select those for which you think a PPP model is appropriate (you can make notes on the sheet with the gap, consult OIE handbook for examples) • To which PPP typology would each PPP fit? Transactional, collaborative, transformative
  6. 6. What are the expected benefits of each of the selected PPP? Who needs to be involved (in each)? What are the roles of the key partners involve? What resources are needed?
  7. 7. Region Woreda PPP model Remark Oromia Dirre- Inchini - Private drug shop in Inchini town to provide mobile service in intervention kebele deworming, spray and treatment - The public sector to provide vaccination services - the public sector to monitor/regulate the private practice No public clinic in the kebele Negele Arsi - Jobless AH graduates in the intervention kebele to apply for PPP Award and provide deworming, spray and treatment service in the intervention kebele - The public sector to provide vaccination services - the public sector to monitor/regulate the private practice No public clinic in the kebele Amhara Bati - Banja - the private clinic in kebele and the public clinic each to provide service (except vaccination) in half of the kebele Private and public clinic in the kebele Somali* Deghabour - Engage a cooperative private service provider firm (Kulmiye) to provide the services in half of the intervention woreda - compare with the public service in half of the woreda Hargele - Engage a cooperative private service provider firm (Kulmiye) to provide the services in half of the intervention woreda - compare with the public service in half of the woreda - Linkage between CAHWs in the kebele with the public sector or Kulmiye to provide services (deworming, spray and treatment) - With EVA - CAHW exists - Far off location - To collaborate with EVA
  8. 8. The Health of Ethiopian Animals for Rural Development (HEARD) project is financed by the European Union. Among the other objectives of the project, ‘improving the technical competencies of veterinary service providers to enable them to deliver better and provide rationalized services’ is implemented by the Ethiopian Veterinarians Association (EVA) and the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) lead HEARD project in partnership with the Ministry of Agriculture of the Ethiopian Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia. ilri.org eva-ethiopia.org

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