The Added Value of an EcoHealth Approach                                                  for the Prevention and Control o...
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The added value of an ecohealth approach for the prevention and control of emerging zoonotic diseases

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Poster presented by Jeffrey Gilbert at the Prince Mahidol Award Conference on "A World United Against Infectious Diseases: Cross-Sectoral Solutions" held in Bangkok, Thailand on 28 January–2 February 2013.

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The added value of an ecohealth approach for the prevention and control of emerging zoonotic diseases

  1. 1. The Added Value of an EcoHealth Approach for the Prevention and Control of Emerging Zoonotic Diseases Jeffrey Gilbert, International Livestock Research Institute, Lao PDR Presented at the Prince Mahidol Award Conference on "A World United Against Infectious Diseases: Cross-Sectoral Solutions” Bangkok, Thailand, 28 January–2 February 2013 A trans-disciplinary research approach has many advantages over a series of individual research projects according to discipline, but there are significant hurdles to be overcome in order to affirm an added value’ EcoHeath manual First joint Masters student – development application of PRA EcoHeath theseis EcoHealth EcoHealth Resource Centre at Increased risk of brucellosis and tools First joint research training courses Chiang Mai University toxoplasmosis field activities Joint Multi-faculty between research activities Prevalence of priority pig MoH/MAF zoonoses Joint MoH/MAF feedback to communities PhD student – Hygiene in small-scale poultry EcoHeath slaughterhouses (2 countries) incorporated into thesis First joint research Determining priority zoonoses First joint field activities application of PRA between Zoonotic causes of acute tools MoH/MAF diarrhoea Joint MoH/MAF feedback to communities Ecology-focussed: behaviour, demography, EcoHealth manual Rabies control and prevention fecundity, socio-cultural development EcoHealth Resource Centre at EcoHealth Gadjah Mada University introduction into undergraduate commuity service Overall success – added value: All eight teams were truly multi-disciplinary from planning through to dissemination, often involving a novel collaboration between disciplines Challenges Solutions• Accepting novel ‘EcoHealth’ paradigm and fostering trans- • 5 year project cycle assisted, learning by doing disciplinary collaboration (some countries rigid mechanism approach gives first-hand experience using country including financial mechanisms) priorities not donor ones • Plans for all countries to disseminate approach and findings to research community, policy makers and communities• Limited capacity within disciplines eg proposal writing, • Mentoring by ILRI researchers & technical experts epidemiology, dissemination (journal articles, policy, IEC) provided real-time suppport according to needs; • EcoHealth(One Health) Resource Centres for regional training and advocacy• Competition with other projects/initiatives/’paradigm (One • Teams/members were encouraged to be part of other Health) initiatives; some team members drafted & submitted multi-country proposal to APEIR• Sustainability of EcoHealth (One Health) approach • Ownership by teams: they chose the priority and conducted the research • Further funding cycle(s) essential: 10+ years to institutionalise EcoZD Ecosystem Approaches to the Better Management of Zoonotic Emerging Infectious Diseases in the Southeast Asia Region Cambodia  China  Indonesia  Lao PDR  Thailand  Vietnam www.ilri.org/ecozd

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