Supplementary/compounded feeding in Kenyan and Indian dairy systems – why so little? <br />FAP Symposium on Feed in Smallh...
Key issues<br />Little use<br /><ul><li>Perceived high cost/affordability by farmers
Increases cost of milk production
Poor returns/quality? </li></ul>Inappropriate use<br /><ul><li>When to feed?
How much?</li></ul>Inappropriate packaging/delivery<br /><ul><li>Micro sizing done by dealers
Poor access</li></ul>2<br />
What we know: Concentrate feed value chain in East Africa<br />3<br />
What we know: Concentrate use in East Africa<br />% of households with cattle utilizing concentrate feeds<br />% of dairy ...
Most farmer use feed ingredients for supplementation</li></ul>Message: Concentrate use is on the increase<br />4<br />
Inefficiencies in concentrate feed manufacture, delivery and use <br />Delivery related<br />Lack of enforcement of feed s...
Quality of Dairy Meal on Kenyan market<br />Source: EADD baseline data, 2010<br />6<br />
Complete ration approaches in India <br />Courtesy: Miracle Fodder and Feeds PVT LTD<br />7<br />
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Supplementary/compounded feeding in Kenyan and Indian dairy systems – why so little?

2,042 views

Published on

Ben Lukuyu and Michael Blummel

FAP Symposium on Feed in Smallholder Systems, Luang Prabang, Laos, 18-19 November 2010

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,042
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
26
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Supplementary/compounded feeding in Kenyan and Indian dairy systems – why so little?

  1. 1. Supplementary/compounded feeding in Kenyan and Indian dairy systems – why so little? <br />FAP Symposium on Feed in Smallholder Systems <br />LuangPrabang, Laos, 18-19 November 2010<br />Ben Lukuyu and Michael Blummel<br />Place photo here<br />1<br />
  2. 2. Key issues<br />Little use<br /><ul><li>Perceived high cost/affordability by farmers
  3. 3. Increases cost of milk production
  4. 4. Poor returns/quality? </li></ul>Inappropriate use<br /><ul><li>When to feed?
  5. 5. How much?</li></ul>Inappropriate packaging/delivery<br /><ul><li>Micro sizing done by dealers
  6. 6. Poor access</li></ul>2<br />
  7. 7. What we know: Concentrate feed value chain in East Africa<br />3<br />
  8. 8. What we know: Concentrate use in East Africa<br />% of households with cattle utilizing concentrate feeds<br />% of dairy farmers feeding various concentrate feed types<br /><ul><li>Dairy meal used by relatively few farmers in Rwanda and Uganda vs. Kenya
  9. 9. Most farmer use feed ingredients for supplementation</li></ul>Message: Concentrate use is on the increase<br />4<br />
  10. 10. Inefficiencies in concentrate feed manufacture, delivery and use <br />Delivery related<br />Lack of enforcement of feed standards: Variability in quality/pricing, quality not known/sub standard<br />Adulteration/ counterfeit product packaging<br />Unqualified manufacturing and advisory staff<br />Limited & costly feed testing for quality and variable results from labs<br />Small scale feed millers not recognized (Uganda)<br />Farm(er) related<br />Lack of knowledge on nutrient requirements<br />Recommendations/feeding not based on diet and production<br />Variable forage quantity and quality- (seasonality and opportunistic feeding)<br />Response due to concentrate use not measured<br />Purchase of small quantities affordable to farmers (micro sizing)<br />5<br />
  11. 11. Quality of Dairy Meal on Kenyan market<br />Source: EADD baseline data, 2010<br />6<br />
  12. 12. Complete ration approaches in India <br />Courtesy: Miracle Fodder and Feeds PVT LTD<br />7<br />
  13. 13. Potential of complete rations with dairy buffalo<br />Block High Block Low<br />CP (%) 17.2 17.1<br />ME (MJ/kg) 8.46 7.37<br />DMI (kg/d) 19.7 18.0 <br />DMI per kg LW 3.6 % 3.3 % <br />Milk Potential 16.6 kg/d 11.8 kg/d<br />8<br />
  14. 14. What has been done: Concentrate re-allocation<br />Treatment 3: Animals fed 8 kg dairy meal per day for 75 days then hay<br />Treatment 2: 4 kg for 150 days<br />Treatment 1: 2 kg for 300 days<br />1. Feeding adequate amount in the early lactation results higher milk yields<br />2. Farmer may need credit facilities. Is it available?<br />9<br />
  15. 15. Complete ration in India: advantages, uptake, outlook <br />Economic advantage over current feeding (largely based on home-mixed supplements) if feed costs >50% of milk price<br />Still adoption slow, under promoted, distorted by subsidies <br />Decentralized rather than centralized production, down-scaled machinery<br />In addition to very targeted (relative to prominent basal diets) supplements<br />Developments of labor cost decisive driver for changes in feeding systems <br />10<br />
  16. 16. Ideas on potential areas of intervention in East Africa<br />Delivery, markets and quality control<br />Formulate action-research interventions on concentrate feed provision: appropriate formulations; micro-sizing; quality control, BDS etc<br />Expand concentrate feed markets – promoting private sector investment in feeds<br />Public sector role in regulating feed supplement/ concentrate) sales appropriately so smallholders have confidence in the products….<br />Use at farm level<br />Strategic use of supplements/concentrate feeds on smallholder farms<br />Formulation and delivery of commercial feed supplements for small-scale lower-income livestock keepers e.g. NOVUS<br />Developing supplement/concentrate feeds guidelines that based on diet and production<br />11<br />
  17. 17. Thank you for your attention<br />12<br />

×