Market OrientedDevelopmental Changes in the        IPMS PLWs        Berhanu Gebremedhin  IPMS Steering Committee Meeting  ...
The Key Message   Small-holder based market oriented agricultural   development can be successfully achieved if   particip...
Data Nineteen “impact type” indicators were developed based on the   project’s Performance Measurement Framework (PMF). ...
Analysis Descriptive analysis of the data. Growth rates computed (number of households producing the market   oriented c...
Teff IPMS sites: Ada’a and Alaba                                 Yield (qt/ha) Promoting improved varieties of   Kuncho ...
Teff18000                                             250000                                                              ...
Wheat IPMS sites: Ada’a, Alaba and    Bure                                                Yield (qt/ha)                  ...
Wheat30000                                             800000                                              2005/06   2009/...
Rice   IPMS sites: Fogera and Metema   Fogera:      Most popular paddy rice in Fogera: X-jigna      Paddy rice trigger...
Chickpea IPMS site: Ada’a Improved chickpea varieties of Ararti, Chefe, Habru and Teji were  promoted All indicators sh...
Chickpea3500                                             90000                                              2005/06   2009...
Haricot bean IPMS sites: Alaba, Dale and Mieso Improved varieties of Awash I, Dimtu, Awash Melka and Mexican Farmer-bas...
Haricot bean35000                                             80000                                              2005/06  ...
Lentils IPMS sites: Ada’a and Atsbi Was not in the initial list of market oriented commodities in Ada’a, but  was trigge...
Lentils5000                                             1000                                               2005/06   2009/...
Banana IPMS sites: Alamata, Metema, Bure, Ada’a and Mieso IPMS and partners promoted the improved varieties of William  ...
Banana1000                                                               2005/06   2009/1    % 900                        ...
Banana                               60000                                                                                ...
Papaya IPMS sites: Bure, Ada’a, Alamata, Metema, and Mieso Unlike other fruits, papaya was already in the farming system...
Papaya80000                                              10000000                                            2005/06   200...
Mango IPMS sites: Alamata, Metema, Bure, Ada’a, Dale, Mieso, and Goma. Mango production was new in many of the PLWs in 2...
Mango1800                                             14000                                             2005/06   2009/10 ...
Avocado IPMS sites: Bure, Ada’a, Mieso, Dale, Goma, and Alamata Improved avocado production relatively new in the PLWS ...
Avocado1200                                             16000                                             2005/06   2009/1...
Farmer-based fruit nursery development   IPMS promoted farmer-based nurseries for avocado, banana, mango and apple.   Av...
Onion   IPMS sites: Atsbi, Alamta, Metema, Fogera, Ada’a, and Mieso   IPMS and partners promoted the improved varieties ...
Fogera farmer-based onion seed system Farmer-based seed supply in Fogera:      Remarkable success was achieved in farmer...
Onion12000                                             1400000                                             2005/06   2009/...
Tomato IPMS sites: Atsbi, Alamata, Metema, Fogera and Mieso. IPMS and partners promoted the improved varieties of Roma  ...
Tomato6000                                              350000                                                 2005/06   2...
Pepper IPMS sites: Alamata, Metema, Bure, Alaba, and Mieso. IPMS and partners promoted the improved varieties of Mareko ...
Pepper50000                                             100000                                             2005/06   2009/...
Dairy production IPMS Sites: Atsbi, Alamata, Fogera, Bure, and Ada’a IPMS and partners promoted Holestein/Fresian cross ...
Dairy2500                                             3500000                                                      2005/06...
Mass Insemination    Lack or shortage of genetically improved animals is a key constraint in the dairy and meat value cha...
Small ruminant fattening IPMS sites: Atsbi, Fogera, Bure, gomma, Alaba, Mieso. Interventions include, improved feeding, ...
Small ruminant fattening60000                                                                2005/06    2009/10    %500004...
Small ruminant fattening 350000                                                                                    1400000...
Cattle fattening IPMS sites: Atsbi, Alamata, Metema, Fogera, Bure, Ada’a, and  Mieso IPMS and partner interventions incl...
Cattle fattening30000                                                              2005/06 2009/10    %2500020000         ...
Cattle fattening50000                                                                                    25000000450004000...
Poultry IPMS sites: Atsbi, Bure, Goma, Alaba, Dale. Interventions were delayed due to the outbreak of Avian Influenza I...
Poultry30000                                             6000000                                                          ...
Apiculture IPMS sites: Atsbi, fogera, bure, ada’a, goma, and Alaba. Rehabilitation of degraded hillsides has boosted the...
Apiculture                                                                                                               2...
Changes in attitude towards HIV-AIDS   IPMS and its partners promoted voluntary testing, protection from unsafe sex, prot...
Extent of institutionalization of the IPMS  approach The survey collected information on the extent to which the IPMS  ap...
Extent to which the IPMS approach has spread  to neighboring woredas District level partners of IPMS were also asked to e...
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Market oriented developmental changes in the IPMS pilot learning woredas (PLWs)

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Presented by Berhanu Gebremedhin at the IPMS Steering Committee Meeting, ILRI, Addis Ababa, 17 April 2012.

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Market oriented developmental changes in the IPMS pilot learning woredas (PLWs)

  1. 1. Market OrientedDevelopmental Changes in the IPMS PLWs Berhanu Gebremedhin IPMS Steering Committee Meeting ILRI, Addis Ababa, 17 April 2012
  2. 2. The Key Message Small-holder based market oriented agricultural development can be successfully achieved if participatory value chain development approach supported by innovation systems perspective is used.
  3. 3. Data Nineteen “impact type” indicators were developed based on the project’s Performance Measurement Framework (PMF). PA level survey conducted in all PAs of the ten PLWs and on all crop and livestock commodities on which IPMS made interventions. Pertain to the production year of 2009/10. Five-year time series data (2005/06 – 2009/10) were collected on the number of households producing, area covered, total production, prices and household market participation. Secondary sources were also used to complement and/or verify the data collected from group interview. Baseline data, diagnostic studies, and several specific case studies conducted by IPMS staff, students and partners, including gender analysis, were also used.
  4. 4. Analysis Descriptive analysis of the data. Growth rates computed (number of households producing the market oriented commodities, area under these commodities, total production, and real revenue obtained from the sale of the produce). Comparisons of yield levels (for 2005/06 to 2009/10). Qualitative analysis:  for farmer perceptions of the changes in farmer attitudes towards HIV/AIDS,  expert opinions on the level of adoption of the IPMS approach within and beyond the PLWs.
  5. 5. Teff IPMS sites: Ada’a and Alaba Yield (qt/ha) Promoting improved varieties of Kuncho (DZ Cr-387), DZ-196, and DZ Cr-37 Local Improved Farmer-based seed system varieties varieties established for Kuncho Ada’a 11 19 -21 All market oriented development indicators consistent and indicated significant change Alaba 5 13-17 Ada’a: Improved teff production replaced wheat and local teff Proportion 84 Alaba: improved teff production of produce replaced local teff sold (%) Introduction of minimum tillage in Metema triggered teff production; Proportion >95% yield of local varieties, 6qt/ha of households selling (%)
  6. 6. Teff18000 250000 2005/06 2009/10 %16000 Total production (qt./year) 20000014000 Number of 1, 209 16, 249 1, 24412000 150000 households10000 producing8000 100000 Number of 134 1, 543 1, 0516000 female-4000 50000 headed2000 households 0 0 Total area 669 12, 833 1, 818 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 No. of male headed households covered No. of female headed households (ha) No. of total households Total area covered (ha) Total production (qt.) Real 7.34 156 2, 027 revenue (million Birr)
  7. 7. Wheat IPMS sites: Ada’a, Alaba and Bure Yield (qt/ha) local improved Market oriented developmental Ada’a 16 35 changes consistent but less dramatic than that of teff Alaba 9 26-30 Bure 19 36-40 Slight decrease in market orientation in wheat in Proportion sold Overall : 61 (%) Ada’a: 47 Ada’a, but significant increase Alaba: 70 in Alaba and Bure Bure: 60 Proportion of 96 households selling (%)
  8. 8. Wheat30000 800000 2005/06 2009/1 % 0 Total production (qt./year) 70000025000 60000020000 Number of 12, 644 25, 378 100 500000 households15000 400000 producing 300000 Number of 1, 180 2, 830 14010000 200000 female-5000 headed 100000 households 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total area 15, 090 18, 723 24 No. of male headed households covered No. of female headed households No. of total households (ha) Total area covered (ha) Total production (qt.) Real 149.2 182.3 22 revenue (million Birr)
  9. 9. Rice IPMS sites: Fogera and Metema Fogera:  Most popular paddy rice in Fogera: X-jigna  Paddy rice triggered interest in growing upland rice by highlanders  IPMS and partners conducted trials on NERICA-3, NERICA-4, SUPERICA-1 and PAWE-1.  NERICA-4 became prefeArred highland variety  X-jigna is also grown in the highlands, 6000 ha in 2010/11 (from nothing in 2004/05); whereas NERICA-3 covered just over 50 ha.  Farmer-based seed multiplication introduced  Average yield of 44qt/ha (cf. 39qt/ha in 2004/05).  IPMS and partners introduced parboiling technology to hotels and restaurants in Woreta and Bahir Dar. In Metema, number of rice farmers reached 207 in 2009/10 (cf. nothing in 2004/05).
  10. 10. Chickpea IPMS site: Ada’a Improved chickpea varieties of Ararti, Chefe, Habru and Teji were promoted All indicators show consistent development in market oriented improved chickpea production Yield: improved varieties, 29 - 32qt/ha; local variety, 15qt/ha. 88% of produce was sold by 95% of producers
  11. 11. Chickpea3500 90000 2005/06 2009/10 % 80000 Total production (qt./year)3000 700002500 60000 Number of 700 2, 992 3272000 50000 households producing1500 40000 30000 Number of 33 279 7451000 20000 female- 500 10000 headed households 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total area 392 2, 610 566 No. of male headed households No. of female headed households covered No. of total households Total area covered (ha) (ha) Total production (qt.) Real 7.4 53.8 631 revenue (million Birr)
  12. 12. Haricot bean IPMS sites: Alaba, Dale and Mieso Improved varieties of Awash I, Dimtu, Awash Melka and Mexican Farmer-based seed supply system was also promoted All indicators show significant development Decline in yield was observed, more pronounced in Dale. Total production grew at a lower rate than total number of households producing or area covered, reinforcing the result that yield declined. About 61% of produce was sold by 88% of producers during 2009/10, but the proportion of households who sold produce dropped sharply to 54% in 2009/10, perhaps because of the drought Yield levels in 2005/06 were 8 qt/ha in Dale, and 6qt/ha in Alaba, which were higher than yield levels of 2009/10.
  13. 13. Haricot bean35000 80000 2005/06 2009/10 % 70000 Total production (qt./year)30000 6000025000 Number of 13, 239 32, 855 148 5000020000 households 40000 producing15000 30000 Number of 1, 862 4, 825 15910000 20000 female-5000 10000 headed households 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total area 4, 148 11, 832 185 No. of male headed households No. of female headed households covered No. of total households Total area covered (ha) (ha) Total production (qt.) Real 10.74 21.9 104 revenue (million Birr)
  14. 14. Lentils IPMS sites: Ada’a and Atsbi Was not in the initial list of market oriented commodities in Ada’a, but was triggered by the expansion of Alemaya variety in neighboring woredas, and IPMS and partners responded by capacitating extension agents and farmers in agronomic practices, variety demonstration, and capacity building on lentil processing to Yerer farmer Cooperative Union. Development was much more dramatic in Ada’a than in Atsbi. About 86% of produce was sold by more than 90% of producers in 2009/10. Nearly all producers in Ada’a and more than 80% in Atsbi sold their produce
  15. 15. Lentils5000 1000 2005/06 2009/10 %4500 900 Total production (qt./year)4000 8003500 700 Number of 927 4, 744 4113000 600 households2500 500 producing2000 400 Number of 134 492 2671500 300 female-1000 200 headed 500 100 households 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total area 517 3, 433 566 No. of male headed households No. of female headed households covered No. of total households Total area covered (ha) (ha) Total production (qt.) Real 9.7 73.4 657 revenue (million Birr)
  16. 16. Banana IPMS sites: Alamata, Metema, Bure, Ada’a and Mieso IPMS and partners promoted the improved varieties of William I, Poyo, Dwarf and Giant Cavendish Heavy emphasis was given to the establishment of farmer-based sucker supply Interventions also included supply of initial planting material, capacity building in sucker and tree management, harvesting and ripening techniques. Only one harvest per year was reported About 63% of banana produce was sold Development of banana production was much more dramatic in Metema which started with 7 farmers in 2005/06, but grew to a business of 596 farmers by 2009/10, growing about 68460 trees.
  17. 17. Banana1000 2005/06 2009/1 % 900 0 800 700 Number of 16 924 5, 600 households 675 500 producing 400 Number of 0 165 -- 300 female- 200 headed 100 households 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total na 71, 601 -- No. of male headed households number of No. of female headed households trees No. of total households Real na 5.8 -- revenue (million Birr)
  18. 18. Banana 60000 1000000 900000 50000 800000No. of producing fruit trees 700000 Total production (qt/year) 40000 600000 30000 500000 400000 20000 300000 200000 10000 100000 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 No. of producing fruit trees Total production (qt.)
  19. 19. Papaya IPMS sites: Bure, Ada’a, Alamata, Metema, and Mieso Unlike other fruits, papaya was already in the farming systems when IPMS started IPMS and partners tried to promote especially solo papaya. Average harvest of twice per year was reported About 60% of produce was sold in 2009/10 by about 89% of producers
  20. 20. Papaya80000 10000000 2005/06 2009/10 % 9000000 Total production (kg/year)70000 800000060000 7000000 Number of 1, 926 8, 243 32850000 6000000 households40000 5000000 producing 400000030000 Number of 151 960 536 300000020000 female- 200000010000 headed 1000000 households 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total na 87, 307 -- No. of male headed households No. of female headed households number of No. of total households No. of producing fruit trees trees Total production (qt.) Real na 10.2 -- revenue (million Birr)
  21. 21. Mango IPMS sites: Alamata, Metema, Bure, Ada’a, Dale, Mieso, and Goma. Mango production was new in many of the PLWs in 2005/06. IPMS and partners promoted the improved varieties of Apple mango, Kent, Keitt and Tommy Atkins Interventions included promoting short-seasoned varieties, (3-4 years compared with 7-10), supply of initial mother trees and grafting materials, establishment of farmer-based seedling supply, and others. Mango production expanded relatively better in Alamata and Dale, followed by Metema. An average of one harvest per year was reported
  22. 22. Mango1800 14000 2005/06 2009/10 %1600 Total production (kg/year) 120001400 100001200 Number of 90 1, 136 1,1000 8000 households 162 producing 800 6000 600 Number of 21 170 709 4000 400 female- 200 2000 headed households 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total na 6, 287 -- No. of male headed households No. of female headed households number of No. of total households No. of producing fruit trees trees Total production (qt.) Real na 0.14 -- revenue (million Birr)
  23. 23. Avocado IPMS sites: Bure, Ada’a, Mieso, Dale, Goma, and Alamata Improved avocado production relatively new in the PLWS IPMS and partners promoted the improved varieties of Pinkerton, Ettinger, Bacon and Hass. Interventions included promoting these short-seasoned varieties (2-4 years), supply of initial mother trees, establishment of farmer-based seedling system, and capacity building in grafting, and tree management.
  24. 24. Avocado1200 16000 2005/06 2009/10 % Total production (kg/year) 140001000 12000 800 Number of 0 935 -- 10000 households 600 8000 producing 6000 400 Number of 0 167 -- 4000 female- 200 2000 headed households 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total na 5, 654 -- No. of male headed households No. of female headed households number of No. of total households No. of producing fruit trees trees Total production (qt.) Real na 0.078 -- revenue (million Birr)
  25. 25. Farmer-based fruit nursery development IPMS promoted farmer-based nurseries for avocado, banana, mango and apple. Avocado:  A total of 17 farmers operated avocado nurseries in Ada’a, Alaba, Bure, Dale, and Goma PLWs in 2009, of which 4 were female-headed.  A total of 7251 avocado seedlings were sold in 2009 for a total value of Birr 121, 000. Mango:  A total of 9 households operated mango nurseries in Dale, Alaba and Ada’a, all of which were male-headed.  A total of 3948 seedlings were sold in 2009 for a total value of Birr 73483. Banana:  A total of 15 households operated banana nurseries in Bure and Metema, of which 3 are female-headed.  A total of 7604 seedlings were sold in 2009 for a total value of Birr 58, 000. Apple:  In Bure, 4 households operated nurseries in 2012 and produced and supplied about 2500 seedlings.  In Atsbi, 4 households operated apple nurseries in 2012 producing 1425 seedlings.
  26. 26. Onion IPMS sites: Atsbi, Alamta, Metema, Fogera, Ada’a, and Mieso IPMS and partners promoted the improved varieties of Adama red and Bombay red, capacity building in nursery management and establishing seed systems Development indicators show significant development during 2005/06 – 2009/10, with a sudden decline in 2008/09, followed by revival. 77% to 93% of onion is produced under irrigation About 0.5 ha per household was under onion in 2009/10. Onion yield under irrigation increased from 100qt/ha to 307qt/ha in Ada’a and from 118qt/ha to 248qt/ha in Fogera. Yield in Atsbi remained constant at 150qt/ha. Basiline yied was 72qt/ha (Fogera) or lower (in other PLWs).
  27. 27. Fogera farmer-based onion seed system Farmer-based seed supply in Fogera:  Remarkable success was achieved in farmer-based onion seed supply in Fogera.  In 2010/11:  About 146 onion seed producer farmers were reported in using 34 ha of land (cf. 0.75 ha in 2005/06).  About 205 qt of onion seed was produced.  A revenue of more than 8 million Birr was reported.  Fogera now supplies seed to Alamata, Kobo, Dembia, Bure, and some woredas in Oromia.
  28. 28. Onion12000 1400000 2005/06 2009/10 % 120000010000 Total production (qt./year) 10000008000 Number of 3, 833 5, 387 84 800000 households6000 producing 6000004000 Number of 373 687 84 400000 female-2000 200000 headed households 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total area 1, 255 2, 623 109 No. of male headed households No. of female headed households covered No. of total households Total area covered (ha) (ha) Total production (qt.) Real 52.8 198.5 276 revenue (million Birr)
  29. 29. Tomato IPMS sites: Atsbi, Alamata, Metema, Fogera and Mieso. IPMS and partners promoted the improved varieties of Roma VF, Sambarsna, Marglobe, Shanti, Melka Salsa, and Melka Shola. Interventions include capacity in nursery management, irrigation agronomy, and post harvest management Introduction of staggered planting buffered farmers from price collapse 88-94% of Tomato production is under irrigation
  30. 30. Tomato6000 350000 2005/06 2009/10 % 3000005000 Total production (qt./year) 2500004000 Number of 1, 685 5, 082 202 200000 households3000 producing 1500002000 Number of 225 621 176 100000 female-1000 50000 headed households 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total area 321 1, 170 264 No. of male headed households No. of female headed households covered No. of total households Total area covered (ha) (ha) Total production (qt.) Real 19 68.7 263 revenue (million Birr)
  31. 31. Pepper IPMS sites: Alamata, Metema, Bure, Alaba, and Mieso. IPMS and partners promoted the improved varieties of Mareko Fana, and some selected local varieties. Interventions include weighing scale calibration, improved cultural practices. Pepper production was already popular in 2005/06, but consistent developments were also registered since then. In sharp contrast to onion and tomato, more than 90% of pepper production was rain fed.
  32. 32. Pepper50000 100000 2005/06 2009/10 %45000 9000040000 80000 Total production (qt./year)35000 70000 Number of 25, 055 45, 935 8330000 60000 households25000 50000 producing20000 40000 Number of 3, 523 6, 122 7415000 30000 female-10000 20000 headed5000 10000 households 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total area 7, 038 11,734 67 No. of male headed households No. of female headed households covered No. of total households Total area covered (ha) (ha) Total production (qt.) Real 83.2 192.2 131 revenue (million Birr)
  33. 33. Dairy production IPMS Sites: Atsbi, Alamata, Fogera, Bure, and Ada’a IPMS and partners promoted Holestein/Fresian cross and Begait About 62% of milk produce is sold Milk yield increased from 4.48 lt/day/cow to 5.79lt/day/cow. No female-headed households were involved in improved dairy in Bure and Fogera; in Atsbi and Alamata, about 20% of producers were female-headed Note:  development changes could be much higher if we consider improvements in local breeds and the butter system.  changes could also e higher if the urban system is considered
  34. 34. Dairy2500 3500000 2005/06 2009/10 % Total milk production (lt./year) 30000002000 Number of 682 2, 156 216 households 2500000 producing1500 2000000 Number of 104 352 238 1500000 female-headed1000 households 1000000 500 Number of 532 1879 253 500000 improved dairy cows producing 0 0 milk 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 No. of male headed households No. of female headed households No. of total households Real revenue 2.2 6.5 195 No. of cows producing milk (million Birr)
  35. 35. Mass Insemination Lack or shortage of genetically improved animals is a key constraint in the dairy and meat value chains. To address this bottleneck the IPMS project initiated the use of mass insemination in targeted production areas using hormones to regulate the estrus cycle as a possible alternative option in different milk sheds in Tigray, Amhara, Oromia and SNNPRS.  This mass AI intervention aims at improving the effectiveness of the AI service delivery (more inseminations/AI technician) and the efficiency of the insemination (increasing pregnancy rate/first insemination).  Effectiveness results of mass insemination in 2 milk sheds indicate that 200 and 175 animals were treated with hormones/inseminated over a 2 week period by 2 AI technicians per milk shed. This results in about 45 inseminations/AI technician/week – as compared to 6 insemination/AI technician/week in the existing system.  Efficiency results indicate that pregnancy rate of 62% which is a significant improvement compared to the current national average rate of 27%, mainly as a result of timely availability of well-trained AI technicians at the time of planned heat period. A second round of action research on mass insemination has taken place in the past months based on i) an assessment of the initial results and lessons learned by the stakeholders and ii) new knowledge and technology including the use of sex fixer to increase the probability of birth of female calves.  So far, a total of 2097 (450 in Oromia, 572 cows in Tigray, 511 cows in SNNPR and 564 cows in Amhara) have been synchronized and about 1000 cows have been given sex fixer.  Preliminary results of the pregnancy rate from Tigray showed 77% pregnancy rate in Adigrat (out of 120 cows treated) and 73% in Wukro (out of 104 cows treated). The average pregnancy rate from the two locations was about 75%. Data from other sites are not yet available.
  36. 36. Small ruminant fattening IPMS sites: Atsbi, Fogera, Bure, gomma, Alaba, Mieso. Interventions include, improved feeding, improved use of crop residues, improved fodder production, and credit supply. In Gomma innovative community-based insurance was used, where female-headed households involved were about 44%, indicating the importance of targeted approach to engender development. More than half of fattened sheep are consumed by the households in Bure and Alaba, whereas about 95% of fattened shoats are sold in Atsbi. Proportion of female-headed households involved in small ruminant fattening across the PLWs was 17%.An average of six animals were fattened per year. An average of 2 fattening cycle per household per year was reported
  37. 37. Small ruminant fattening60000 2005/06 2009/10 %5000040000 Number of 27, 523 54, 554 98 households producing3000020000 Number of 4, 657 9, 519 104 female-headed households10000 0 Total number of 164, 296 314, 077 91 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 animals fattened No. of male headed households No. of female headed households No. of total households Real revenue 46 120 159 (million Birr)
  38. 38. Small ruminant fattening 350000 14000000 300000 12000000 250000 10000000 Total revenue (Birr) 200000 80000000 150000 60000000 100000 40000000 50000 20000000 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total animals fattened per year Total animals sold per year Total revenue (Birr)
  39. 39. Cattle fattening IPMS sites: Atsbi, Alamata, Metema, Fogera, Bure, Ada’a, and Mieso IPMS and partner interventions include improved feeding, improved forage development, and improved use of crop residues. A household fattened 2 animals per year and sold both An average of 1.5 fattening cycle per household was reported Involvement of female-headed households was highest in Atsbi (15%), followed by Ada’a (11%), Mieso (9%), Fogera (5%), and Bure (2.5%). Fattening cattle was new in Metema when IPMS introduced it.
  40. 40. Cattle fattening30000 2005/06 2009/10 %2500020000 Number of 6, 157 24, 391 296 households15000 producing10000 Number of 308 2, 121 587 female-5000 headed households 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total number 9902 47, 524 380 No. of male headed households of fattened No. of female headed households animals No. of total households Real 44 207.5 867 revenue (million Birr)
  41. 41. Cattle fattening50000 250000004500040000 2000000035000 Total Revenue (Birr)30000 150000002500020000 100000001500010000 50000000 5000 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Total animals fattened per year Total animals sold per year Total revenue (Birr)
  42. 42. Poultry IPMS sites: Atsbi, Bure, Goma, Alaba, Dale. Interventions were delayed due to the outbreak of Avian Influenza IPMS and partner interventions included promotion of exotic breeds, improved feeding and management options. Egg productivity increased from 154/hen/yr to 199/hen/yr. About 72% of eggs were sold by about 85% of producers. More than 50% of improved poultry producers in Atsbi are female- headed; while only 19% in Bure.
  43. 43. Poultry30000 6000000 2005/06 2009/10 %25000 5000000 Number of 6, 602 17, 126 159 households Total eggsproduced producing20000 4000000 Number of 1, 950 5585 186 female-headed15000 3000000 households10000 2000000 Number of 10091 26611 163 improved hens5000 1000000 producing eggs 0 0 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Number of eggs 1.55 5.3 242 produced/year No. of male headed households (million) No. of female headed households No. of total households Number improved hens producing egg Total eggs produced per year Real revenue 1.0 3.9 291 (million Birr)
  44. 44. Apiculture IPMS sites: Atsbi, fogera, bure, ada’a, goma, and Alaba. Rehabilitation of degraded hillsides has boosted the potential of modern apiculture- potential for new families, especially landless. IPMS and partner interventions include promoting box hives, input supply (wax and accessories) by helping establish input supply shops, capacity building in modern hive management, bee forage development. Average honey yield during the first harvest was 27kg/hive, and yield from second harvest was about 17 kg. An average of 34kg/household was sold (highest in Atsbi at 60 kg). Note:  IPMS interventions were not limited to box hives; so impact could be higher. Proportion of female-headed households involved in modern apiculture in Atsbi was 27% (up from 19% in 2005/06), but below 4% in Alaba, Bure and Fogera.
  45. 45. Apiculture 2005/06 2009/10 %9000 4000008000 Total honey produced (kg/year) 3500007000 300000 Number of 1, 745 5, 074 1916000 250000 households5000 producing 2000004000 150000 Number of 271 861 2183000 female-headed 1000002000 households1000 50000 0 0 Number of box 2, 644 7, 676 190 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 beehives occupied with No. of male headed households colonies No. of female headed households No. of total households No. of modern hives occupied with bees Real revenue 4.94 11.19 127 (million Birr)
  46. 46. Changes in attitude towards HIV-AIDS IPMS and its partners promoted voluntary testing, protection from unsafe sex, protection from non-sexual transmission methods, pre-marital HIV testing, and providing support to infected individuals. Changes in attitude:  The change in attitude with regard to voluntary testing was rated either significantly improved or moderately improved more than 95% of the time.  The change in attitude with regard to protection from unsafe sex was also rated significantly or moderately improved more than 90% of the time in nine of the ten PLWs. In Alaba PLW, significantly or moderate improvement was rated only 72% of the time.  Farmer view that attitude towards protection from non-sexual methods of protection has improved either significantly or moderately more than 90% of the time across all PLWs.  With regard to pre-marital HIV testing, farmers in 7 of the PLWs rated the improvement in attitude to be significant or moderately significant more than 90% of the time. Significant or moderate improvement in attitude was also reported 80% of the time in Dale. However, farmers in Mieso and Alaba reported that there was no change in behavior 69% of the time.  Farmer ratings regarding improvements in behavior in providing support to HIV-infected was reported as moderate improvement more than 74% of the time in only five of the PLWs. Farmers in Dale viewed moderate improvement about 66% of the time. Four of the PLWs (Bure, Meiso, Goma and Alaba) reported that there had not been improvement in behavior in providing support to infected people more than 63% of the time.
  47. 47. Extent of institutionalization of the IPMS approach The survey collected information on the extent to which the IPMS approach (participatory value chain development, bottom-up extension, and mainstreaming HIV/AIDs and gender in agricultural development) on a three-point scale (high, moderate, nil). District level partners were asked to respond to these questions.  Results show that the IPMS approaches have been institutionalized either highly or moderately.  The one exception is the Mieso PLW, due to various reasons including security problems and frequent staff turnover.
  48. 48. Extent to which the IPMS approach has spread to neighboring woredas District level partners of IPMS were also asked to evaluate the extent to which the IPMS approach has spread to neighboring districts.  While the participatory value chain development approach was reported to have spread to neighboring woredas in 8 of the PLWs, 2 of the PLWS (Mieso and Alaba) reported no spread.  The spread of bottom-up approach to extension was lower, where only five of the PLWS (Atsbi, Alamata, Ada’a, Goma and Alaba) reported spread to neighboring woredas.  Similarly, the spread of mainstreaming HIV/AIDS and gender in agricultural development was low, where only five PLWs (Alamata, Ada’a, Alaba, Goma, and Dale) reported spread.
  49. 49. Thank You!

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